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Sinatra, Hepburn, Curtis and co laid bare in series of touchingly intimate portraits

British photographer Terry O'Neill has spent his life peering into the world of celebrity. One of the world's most collected photographers, he has snapped stars including Brigitte Bardot, Audrey Hepburn and Faye Dunaway. <!-- -->
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</br>Running until March 1 at The Little Black Gallery London, <a href='http://www.thelittleblackgallery.com/' target='_blank'>"The Best of Terry O'Neill"</a> showcases some of his most iconic photos of leading ladies on the set and in repose. "They were all beautiful," the 75-year-old photographer says. "They don't make girls like that today."<!-- -->
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</br>This photo shows Dunaway at the Beverly Hills Hotel the morning after she won an Oscar for "Network" in 1977. "I was sick to death of all those Oscar pictures of actresses holding up the Oscar and grinning like idiots," he says. "I knew her money would go up from half a million to like 10 million dollars a movie. I wanted to capture all that the next day<!-- -->
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</br>- Interview by <a href='https://twitter.com/willyleeadams' target='_blank'>William Lee Adams</a>

British photographer Terry O'Neill has spent his life peering into the world of celebrity. One of the world's most collected photographers, he has snapped stars including Brigitte Bardot, Audrey Hepburn and Faye Dunaway.

Running until March 1 at The Little Black Gallery London, "The Best of Terry O'Neill" showcases some of his most iconic photos of leading ladies on the set and in repose. "They were all beautiful," the 75-year-old photographer says. "They don't make girls like that today."

This photo shows Dunaway at the Beverly Hills Hotel the morning after she won an Oscar for "Network" in 1977. "I was sick to death of all those Oscar pictures of actresses holding up the Oscar and grinning like idiots," he says. "I knew her money would go up from half a million to like 10 million dollars a movie. I wanted to capture all that the next day

- Interview by William Lee Adams