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Feminism is no longer a dirty word

By Carol Costello
May 28, 2014 -- Updated 2101 GMT (0501 HKT)
Writer and activist Gloria Steinem speaks in November during an Equality Now event in Los Angeles. Steinem helped usher in the women's liberation movement during the 1960s and 1970s, and she remains one of its most outspoken and visible symbols. Writer and activist Gloria Steinem speaks in November during an Equality Now event in Los Angeles. Steinem helped usher in the women's liberation movement during the 1960s and 1970s, and she remains one of its most outspoken and visible symbols.
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Feminist icon Gloria Steinem
Feminist icon Gloria Steinem
Feminist icon Gloria Steinem
Feminist icon Gloria Steinem
Feminist icon Gloria Steinem
Feminist icon Gloria Steinem
Feminist icon Gloria Steinem
Feminist icon Gloria Steinem
Feminist icon Gloria Steinem
Feminist icon Gloria Steinem
Feminist icon Gloria Steinem
Feminist icon Gloria Steinem
Feminist icon Gloria Steinem
Feminist icon Gloria Steinem
Feminist icon Gloria Steinem
Feminist icon Gloria Steinem
Feminist icon Gloria Steinem
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STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • The face of feminism, Gloria Steinem, turns 80 on Tuesday
  • Carol Costello says feminism is popular with young women, who reject stereotypes
  • Rush Limbaugh railed against Sandra Fluke, but his jibes cut little weight with many, she says
  • Young women see the value in speaking out against gender bias, she says

Editor's note: Carol Costello anchors the 9 to 11 a.m. ET edition of CNN's "Newsroom" each weekday.

(CNN) -- Happy birthday, Gloria Steinem!

The "Face of Feminism" turns 80 Tuesday, and guess what? Feminism seems to be turning the corner -- again. Many young women are now embracing the term and rejecting the notion that feminists are hairy, ugly, man-hating, angry women.

Heck, even Beyonce appeared on the cover of Steinem's magazine, Ms., last year.

Carol Costello
Carol Costello

And lest critics point to Beyonce's overt sexuality as evidence of her hypocrisy, this year Queen Bey took it a step further and wrote an essay for "The Shriver Report: A Woman's Nation Pushes Back from the Brink." In it, Beyonce Knowles-Carter (note the hyphenated name!) proclaimed that "gender equality is a myth!" She went on to write, "the average working woman earns only 77 percent of what the average working man makes. But unless women and men both say this is unacceptable, things will not change."

A few years ago, Emma Watson told People magazine of her "Harry Potter" character, "Hermione's not scared to be clever. I think sometimes really smart girls dumb themselves down a bit, and that's bad." Watson added she's a lot like Hermione: "I'm a bit of a feminist. I'm very competitive and challenging."

That's not to say all young women feel the same. Or certain older men.

5 reasons why we love Gloria Steinem

Gloria Steinem: Medal of Freedom honoree
The names Betty, Gloria and Shirley probably come to mind when most think of feminists, but there's a whole group of young women -- and men -- who are working toward equality. Here is a short list -- who would you add? Tweet us @CNNLiving with #fem2.
Malala Yousafzai is a Pakistani student and education activist, who gained international attention after she was shot in 2012 by Taliban gunmen. "I want to become a prime minister of Pakistan," she said, saying it could make her "the doctor of the whole country." The names Betty, Gloria and Shirley probably come to mind when most think of feminists, but there's a whole group of young women -- and men -- who are working toward equality. Here is a short list -- who would you add? Tweet us @CNNLiving with #fem2. Malala Yousafzai is a Pakistani student and education activist, who gained international attention after she was shot in 2012 by Taliban gunmen. "I want to become a prime minister of Pakistan," she said, saying it could make her "the doctor of the whole country."
Young feminists
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Photos: Feminists of the future Photos: Feminists of the future

Rush Limbaugh perverts the word "feminist" all the time. He likes to call his targets "feminist extremists" and "feminazis."

In 2012, Limbaugh took on Georgetown law student Sandra Fluke. She testified before Congress about the need for her Jesuit university to provide contraception insurance coverage for female students.

She even admitted to being an "American woman who uses contraceptives." Oh, my!

Limbaugh promptly labeled her a "feminazi" and a "slut."

Or to quote the big man himself, "So, Ms. Fluke and the rest of you feminazis, here's the deal. If we are going to pay for your contraceptives, and thus pay for you to have sex, we want something for it, and I'll tell you what it is. We want you to post the videos online so we can all watch."

It so evokes Bobby Riggs, right? A pro tennis player who, on September 20, 1973, challenged Billie Jean King to a tennis match because "the best way to handle women is to keep them barefoot and pregnant."

Happy 80th, Gloria Steinem

Courtney Martin, who co-edited Feministing.com -- a widely read and influential feminist blog -- and author of "Perfect Girls, Starving Daughters," says many young women have been afraid of the word "feminist" because it's been the target of a powerful smear campaign for decades. But, thanks largely to the Internet, smears like Limbaugh's are losing their power.

At Feministing.com, she says, "we get mail from teenaged girls in the middle of Iowa who say ... 'I stumbled on your site and realized feminism isn't about man-hating and Birkenstocks.' " It's actually "kind of cool and counter-cultural."

Wow. Really? Martin says yes. Because today's feminist movement realized it had to embrace aesthetics. Beauty and fun and relationships matter, too. So does the cool factor. Jon Stewart, anyone? Stewart has a cultural agenda, he's cool, and young people follow him in droves.

Jessica Valenti, an author sometimes described as a feminist evangelist, says that when she delivered talks on feminism on college campuses a few years ago, one or two hands went up when she asked who considered themselves a feminist. Today, she says, "now almost all of them do."

And, says Martin, it's not just because of "cool" or contraception or abortion rights. It's because of a more evolved definition of feminism.

"Feminism means a fight for others," Martin said. It's about living a "feminist life." That means equality for everyone: women, children and, yes, men. That includes advocating on issues like immigration, human trafficking and so much more.

Perhaps Lena Chen, an activist and media commentator for Salon, Glamour and her own blog, put it best. "In my lifetime feminism has evolved far beyond the binary identity politics of women vs. men," she wrote in an e-mail. "To me, feminism is one part of a larger global movement for liberation. Gender norms dictating how you ought to behave, dress, marry, or work are oppressive regardless of what body you inhabit or how you identify yourself."

She says social media have helped many young activists in her generation speak with powerful voices.

They no longer need one "figurehead" in "order to create change."

They just need each other.

So, happy birthday, Gloria. On your 80th birthday, feminism has indeed turned a corner. We'll have to see how far it has gone when you turn 90. Or 100.

Follow us on Twitter @CNNOpinion.

Join us on Facebook/CNNOpinion.

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of Carol Costello.

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