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The secret to human flight? This suit

<i>Is it a bird? Is it a plane? Actually, it's a bit of both. </i><!-- -->
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</br>Wingsuits fly for the same reason jets take off and eagles soar.<!-- -->
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</br>The suits turn the human body into an "airfoil" -- a curved wing that produces lift by allowing air to flow faster over the wing than under it.<!-- -->
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</br>Skydiving photographer <a href='http://www.theharryparker.com/' target='_blank'>Harry Parker</a> caught these incredible images of wingsuiter Rip Cord in action over Sebastian, Florida. And we asked skydiving pioneer Tony Uragallo, founder of <a href='http://www.tonywingsuits.com/index.html' target='_blank'>TonySuits</a>, to tell us more about how today's wingsuits fly.<!-- -->
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</br><i>[All photos: Courtesy </i><i><a href='http://www.theharryparker.com/' target='_blank'>Harry Parker Photography</a></i><i>]</i>

Is it a bird? Is it a plane? Actually, it's a bit of both.

Wingsuits fly for the same reason jets take off and eagles soar.

The suits turn the human body into an "airfoil" -- a curved wing that produces lift by allowing air to flow faster over the wing than under it.

Skydiving photographer Harry Parker caught these incredible images of wingsuiter Rip Cord in action over Sebastian, Florida. And we asked skydiving pioneer Tony Uragallo, founder of TonySuits, to tell us more about how today's wingsuits fly.

[All photos: Courtesy Harry Parker Photography]