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The rise and rise of the "McMansion"

Between 2006 and 2012, Swedish photographer <a href='http://www.martinadolfsson.com/' target='_blank'>Martin Adolfsson</a> set-out to capture the rise of gated, suburban communities in emerging nations around the world.<!-- -->
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</br>Intrigued by the rising middle class in these fast-expanding economies, Adolfsson visited 44 model homes in eight different countries. All displayed strikingly similar characteristics and seemed to be taking their lead from architectural and structural ideas popularized across the U.S over the last century.<!-- -->
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</br>The houses featured in this image for instance would not seem out of place in Florida or Arizona. In actual fact, they are part of the Millennium Park development situated on the outskirts of Moscow, Russia.<!-- -->
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</br>But why does the great American suburban dream (and the imaginatively named "McMansion" style house) hold such appeal outside of the U.S.?<!-- -->
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</br>We spoke to the Brooklyn-based photographer, who released a self-published book called <a href='http://suburbiagonewild.com/' target='_blank'>Suburbia Gone Wild</a> on the topic last year, to find out.<!-- -->
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</br><strong>Interview and captions by Eoghan Macguire</strong>

Between 2006 and 2012, Swedish photographer Martin Adolfsson set-out to capture the rise of gated, suburban communities in emerging nations around the world.

Intrigued by the rising middle class in these fast-expanding economies, Adolfsson visited 44 model homes in eight different countries. All displayed strikingly similar characteristics and seemed to be taking their lead from architectural and structural ideas popularized across the U.S over the last century.

The houses featured in this image for instance would not seem out of place in Florida or Arizona. In actual fact, they are part of the Millennium Park development situated on the outskirts of Moscow, Russia.

But why does the great American suburban dream (and the imaginatively named "McMansion" style house) hold such appeal outside of the U.S.?

We spoke to the Brooklyn-based photographer, who released a self-published book called Suburbia Gone Wild on the topic last year, to find out.

Interview and captions by Eoghan Macguire