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Surprise! Women prefer positive images of women

June 23, 2014 -- Updated 1002 GMT (1802 HKT)
A woman working in robotics is the best-selling image of the collection in China. "There is such a dearth of women in STEM industries worldwide," says Pam Grossman, Director of Visual Trends at Getty Images. "We believe that showing more pictures of females with technical skills can help play a part in normalizing these images and promoting them in real life." A woman working in robotics is the best-selling image of the collection in China. "There is such a dearth of women in STEM industries worldwide," says Pam Grossman, Director of Visual Trends at Getty Images. "We believe that showing more pictures of females with technical skills can help play a part in normalizing these images and promoting them in real life."
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Bestselling Lean In collection images
Bestselling Lean In collection images
Bestselling Lean In collection images
Bestselling Lean In collection images
Bestselling Lean In collection images
Bestselling Lean In collection images
Bestselling Lean In collection images
Bestselling Lean In collection images
Bestselling Lean In collection images
Bestselling Lean In collection images
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STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • A new collection of Getty Images curated in partnership with Lean In shows women in a more diverse light
  • Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg and Getty co-founder and CEO Jonathan Klein presented the collection
  • The 2,500 images depict the diverse experience of women in contemporary work and life

Editor's note: Leading Women connects you to extraordinary women of our time. Each month, we meet two women at the top of their field, exploring their careers, lives and ideas.

(CNN) -- It shouldn't be a surprise. An image of a woman holding her own, looking smart and strong in the workplace, is more inspiring than a photograph of a stressed female executive struggling with a briefcase and a howling baby.

But at a presentation Wednesday at the Cannes Lions advertising festival in France, Facebook COO and Lean In founder Sheryl Sandberg, and Getty co-founder and CEO Jonathan Klein revealed what had spurred them to create the Lean In collection, a curated selection of Getty imagery that shows women in a more diverse light - and revealed why it's better for business.

Facebook boss empowers women
Sheryl Sandberg's challenge to women

"We still live in a world - and this is a shocker," Sandberg said wryly, "but it's still overwhelmingly run by men.

"Less than six percent of CEOs in any country, including the [United States], are women."

"There is huge cultural variety around the world," Sandberg continued, "But the stereotypes of men and women are actually exactly the same.

"Men are told to lead, to be results focused. Women are told they should speak when spoken to. Little girls are called bossy, little boys are called leaders.

"As human beings when something surprises us, or goes against our expectations, we dislike it. So if we show images of women leading, we actually change this."

Klein said, "There is nothing more powerful than an image that captures something in the moment ... that gets people to change their minds."

Stepping away from stereotypical images showing women in passive or objectifying situations, the collection offers alternative representations of women doing physical jobs, working in robotics, aging gracefully and - Sandberg said emphatically - "not laughing eating salad."

"Little girls are called bossy, little boys are called leaders.
Sheryl Sandberg, Lean In founder

The Lean in/Getty partnership, which launched in February, was greenlit by Sandberg when Getty's Pamela Grossman and Lean In's Jessica Bennett presented Getty findings that suggested commercial clients were starting to look for a broader representation of women to use in their creative.

And it's working. Getty has seen sales of the images in the 2,500-strong collection -- all of which were previously available -- jump by 54%. "I wish we could see that pattern repeated across the entire Getty archive," joked Klein.

Lean In's push for a wider diversity of imagery in the media is part of a broader commercial trend towards a presentation of womanhood that's more reflective of the lives of real women. Sandberg, who attributes this to the appeal of authentic user-generated content on social media, highlighted the groundbreaking example of Dove's "Real Beauty" campaign, which celebrated a wide variety of female body types in addition to the lean silhouette traditionally favored by the media.

Dove's recent Father's Day advertisement for Dove Men+Care shone a light on the positive contribution of men at home and gained over 10 million views.

She also pointed to more recent examples such as Pantene's "Labels against Women" viral hit, produced for P&G Pantene by BBD Guerrero, Manila, that highlighted the different words ("persuasive" vs "pushy," "dedicated" vs "selfish") applied to high achieving men and women.

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Pantene's "Labels against Women" video highlighted different perceptions of career women and men and went viral, gaining 46 million views by the time of writing.

Campaigns such as these prove that a more representative approach that's less perfect and more reflective of a diverse, global audience can gain significant social traction - nirvana to advertising executives seeking the holy grail of "earned social media" - industry jargon for trusted consumer word-of-mouth endorsement.

The Pantene Philippines advertisement's 46 million views boosted brand favorability, especially in women aged 18-24, and increased engagement with the brand by over four times, according to the agency. Its follow-up,"Not Sorry," which launched Wednesday also, leverages the success of the popular #sorrynotsorry hashtag and questions why women feel the need to constantly apologize. It's widely expected to repeat the success of its predecessor.

Pantene's follow-up video to its "Labels Against Women" viral hit, "Not Sorry," is expected by the industry to go viral like its predecessor.

Sandberg then challenged the audience of advertisers and agencies to reflect a more representative world in their creative, citing their potential reach.

"Bestselling books will sell two million copies," she said. "The first Pantene advert got 46 million views. [The campaign will] have reached 40 million people by the time the [latest] campaign is done.

"We can show women with crying babies in briefcases or women hiding under their desks, or we can show women at their desks."

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