Rave your way to work in the morning?

London's Rave-volution
London's Rave-volution

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Story highlights

  • Growing numbers are getting their kicks out of pre-work rave parties
  • Morning Gloryville hosts monthly early morning raves that are "drug-free"
  • Nurses, lawyers, parents with kids, seniors and teenyboppers attend
  • Morning Gloryville has found its way into 16 cities
Bored with boot-camp, or sick of spinning? Growing numbers are getting their kicks out of pre-work rave parties as the way to shed calories and gain a natural high.
It's 7.30 on a foggy Wednesday morning and heavy bass is thick in the air outside an industrial-looking venue in East London. There's excited chatter in the queue, with clubbers dressed in everything from lycra bodysuits to cow costumes.
Inside, a crowd of thousand are getting whipped up by the DJ as they bounce around on the dance floor. The tunes date back to the 1990s and plenty of people here remember the rave generation or were part of it. There are nurses, lawyers, parents with kids, a smattering of seniors and some teenyboppers too.
This monthly event, called Morning Gloryville, is billed as drug-free. The only dealing is going on at the smoothie bar.
On paper, it's hard to see how it works, but the vibe is full of energy. As for the dress code, you wear what you fancy and you dance how you want. "I just feel very wired and on it, and ready to take on the day. I just wish it was just more often than once a month," said Martin Edwards, sporting a lycra jumpsuit and multi-colored cape.
Morning Gloryville has found its way into 16 cities, with Berlin and Montreal the latest to sign up. Co-founder Sam Moyo says she's getting corporate inquiries to bring pre-work raves direct to the workplace.
"(There's) productivity, team building, mainly that happiness factor because companies are starting to realize actually above everything else happiness is the number one thing your team needs in order to be productive," she said.
As the crowd clears off, it's all coats and dresses, jackets and ties. You'd have never known what they had been up to -- except for the smiles, and the odd smearing of glitter.