NASCAR driver Kurt Busch testifies ex-girlfriend is an assassin

    NASCAR driver claims ex-girlfriend is trained assassin
    NASCAR driver claims ex-girlfriend is trained assassin

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    NASCAR driver claims ex-girlfriend is trained assassin 01:53

    Story highlights

    • Kurt Busch's ex, Patricia Driscoll, requests a no-contact order, saying he slammed her into a wall
    • Busch's attorney denies that; Busch testifies that Driscoll is an assassin for U.S. government
    • Driscoll is a defense contractor; her attorney says it's normal for her to carry a weapon but she's not an assassin

    (CNN)NASCAR driver Kurt Busch, who has been accused by his ex-girlfriend Patricia Driscoll of domestic assault, testified in a court hearing Tuesday that he believes Driscoll is a trained assassin and that she once showed up wearing a gown covered in blood.

    While testifying in court in Dover, Delaware, over Driscoll's request for a no-contact order, Busch said that Driscoll is an assassin for the U.S. government who would go on covert missions around the world. He also said that Driscoll had claimed a character in the movie "Zero Dark Thirty" was based on her and other women.
      In his testimony, Busch said that once when he and Driscoll were in El Paso, Texas, Driscoll went out in camouflage gear, only to return later wearing an evening gown covered with blood and a trench coat.
      When asked by his attorney, Rusty Hardin, why he believed Driscoll is a hired killer, Busch said, "Everybody on the outside can tell me I'm crazy, but I lived on the inside and saw it firsthand."
      Driscoll and her attorney, Carolyn McNeice, did not challenge Busch's testimony while in court Tuesday. Driscoll is a defense contractor and is authorized to carry weapons.
      "Police officers, correction officers and military personnel are trained to use weapons," McNeice told CNN on Wednesday. "They're not assassins."
      When asked about Busch's allegations, McNeice told CNN, "We deny that entirely."
      The family court battle stems from a November incident where Driscoll says that Busch assaulted her. Driscoll has accused Busch of grabbing her by the throat and slamming her head into a wall three times while they were in Busch's motor home at Dover International Speedway. The state attorney general is still investigating the case.
      Hardin said that his client did not assault Driscoll.
      "We know one thing. (Busch) never, ever physically abused her, and we're real comfortable that that was made clear today -- the last two days in particular," Hardin said Tuesday.
      Hardin said in a statement in November that Busch would fully cooperate in the investigation, saying the allegation "is a complete fabrication by a woman who has refused to accept the end of a relationship."
      After the no-contact hearing on Tuesday, Busch said he was "just glad that the truth got told."