MH370: Did a fire break out on doomed Malaysia airlines flight?

Story highlights

  • Claims of new MH370 debris found in Madagascar
  • Evidence of alleged burn marks inside the plane yet to be confirmed

(CNN)He's the man who has already made a name for himself by finding parts of the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 but has Blaine Gibson unveiled a brand new mystery?

Gibson says he has located evidence that appears to show burn marks. If true, it would be the first time such marks have been found on remnants of the aircraft.
    The pieces, which were recovered near Sainte Luce, in southeastern Madagascar, are yet to be independently verified.
    MH370, which was flying from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing, disappeared in March 2014 with 239 people on board.
    Debris piece with burn/scorch marks to both sides found at Sainte Luce, Madagascar
    The new discoveries were all sent to investigators at the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB).
    The ATSB was unavailable for comment.
    Debris piece with burn/scorch marks to both sides.
    Gibson, a U.S. lawyer from Seattle, is leading a self-funded hunt for the missing plane in an exhaustive search that has taken him from the Maldives to Mauritius and Myanmar.
    "I've been very involved in the search for Malaysia 370, just out of personal interest and in a private group -- not in a for-profit way or journalistic way," Gibson told CNN in March.
    In June 2016, Gibson discovered between 15 to 20 washed-up personal items on a Madagascar beach, including a small backpack, a computer case and several cabin-sized carry-on items.
    "Until I or someone else finds the plane and the truth about what happened to it and the passengers, [I'll keep going]," he told CNN in March.
    "The search must go on, it can't stop when the present search area is exhausted. We have to solve this mystery," he added.
    Debris from a Boeing 777 washed up on the western Indian Ocean island of Reunion in the last week of July 2015.
    Ocean currents could indeed have taken the debris from where it's thought MH370 came down to Reunion, the head of the ATSB said at the time.
    Gibson at Riake Beach.
    On August 5 of last year, Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak confirmed the debris was from the missing plane.
    In the year since then, five other pieces of wreckage have been discovered which investigators say are likely from Malaysia Airlines 370.