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Web-only Exclusives
November 30, 2000

From Our Correspondent: Hirohito and the War
A conversation with biographer Herbert Bix

From Our Correspondent: A Rough Road Ahead
Bad news for the Philippines - and some others

From Our Correspondent: Making Enemies
Indonesia needs friends. So why is it picking fights?

Asiaweek Time Asia Now Asiaweek story

OCTOBER 15, 1999 VOL. 25 NO. 41

Letters


Much ado
The Malaysian government's latest position on Anwar Ibrahim's arsenic poisoning is intriguing. It now says that although there are traces of arsenic in Anwar's body, they are well below dangerous levels ["Much Ado About Nothing?" THE NATIONS, Oct. 15]. What the government doesn't say is that even at current levels, arsenic in Anwar's body is well above what it is normal in a human being. Why? I thought he was a prisoner. Moreover, the medical report does not explain Anwar's symptoms of rapid hair loss, numbness in his fingers, and dizziness.
David Teoh
Malacca, Malaysia


East Timor Intervention
Azmi Kahlid's comment [TALKING POINTS, Oct. 8] is typical of the Malaysian government's paranoia over some kind of perceived colonization by the "white people" over the "brown people." The most probable reason for Australian Prime Minister John Howard's suggestion of his country's involvement in Asian security is that he realizes the need for somebody to take a lead. The ASEAN leaders, with their head-in-the-sand policy of "non-interference," are content to see armed thugs rampaging around and are unable to form a working alliance that would benefit the people and economies of the region.
M. Sally
Penang


Confucius and Chinese Tourism
As a recent first-time visitor to China, I can vouch for the accuracy of Confucius's Analect 4:16 about the seekers of virtue and gain, and S. Tsow's colorful translation [LETTERS & COMMENT, Oct. 8]. In eight days of visiting wonderful monuments, I met only one "cool dude" but innumerable others, whose incessant and aggressive efforts to extract money from me at every turn in exchange for worthless tourist tattle left me saddened and resolved never to set foot in the country again.
K. Wai Loh
Kuala Lumpur


Bedazzled in Las Vegas?
Hong Kong Financial Secretary Donald Tsang's visit to Las Vegas reminded me of my young daughter's first visit to Disneyland: the same childish bedazzlement [NEWSMAKERS, Oct. 8]. Political responsibilities, however, demand much more maturity.
Jorge Rangel
Macau

Rangel is under-secretary for administration, education and youth in the Macau government. - Editors


CORRECTION
Due to a processing error, People's Daily Editor Ma Licheng was misquoted in PEOPLE TO KNOW ["China At 50," Sept. 24]. His remark about the Falungong should have read: "The Falungong represents the backward and dark side of China."


This edition's table of contents | Asiaweek home

AsiaNow



WASHINGTON
U.S. secretary of state says China should be 'tolerant'

MANILA
Philippine government denies Estrada's claim to presidency

ALLAHABAD
Faith, madness, magic mix at sacred Hindu festival

COLOMBO
Land mine explosion kills 11 Sri Lankan soldiers

TOKYO
Japan claims StarLink found in U.S. corn sample

BANGKOK
Thai party announces first coalition partner



TIME:

COVER: President Joseph Estrada gives in to the chanting crowds on the streets of Manila and agrees to make room for his Vice President

THAILAND: Twin teenage warriors turn themselves in to Bangkok officials

CHINA: Despite official vilification, hip Chinese dig Lamaist culture

PHOTO ESSAY: Estrada Calls Snap Election

WEB-ONLY INTERVIEW: Jimmy Lai on feeling lucky -- and why he's committed to the island state



ASIAWEEK:

COVER: The DoCoMo generation - Japan's leading mobile phone company goes global

Bandwidth Boom: Racing to wire - how underseas cable systems may yet fall short

TAIWAN: Party intrigues add to Chen Shui-bian's woes

JAPAN: Japan's ruling party crushes a rebel at a cost

SINGAPORE: Singaporeans need to have more babies. But success breeds selfishness


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