ad info




CNN.com
 MAIN PAGE
 WORLD
 U.S.
 LOCAL
 POLITICS
 WEATHER
 BUSINESS
 SPORTS
 TECHNOLOGY
 SPACE
* HEALTH
 AIDS
 Aging
 Alternative
 Cancer
 Children
 Diet & Fitness
 Men
 Women
 ENTERTAINMENT
 BOOKS
 TRAVEL
 FOOD
 ARTS & STYLE
 NATURE
 IN-DEPTH
 ANALYSIS
 myCNN

 Headline News brief
 news quiz
 daily almanac

  MULTIMEDIA:
 video
 video archive
 audio
 multimedia showcase
 more services

  E-MAIL:
Subscribe to one of our news e-mail lists.
Enter your address:
Or:
Get a free e-mail account

 DISCUSSION:
 message boards
 chat
 feedback

  CNN WEB SITES:
CNN Websites
 AsiaNow
 En Español
 Em Português
 Svenska
 Norge
 Danmark
 Italian

 FASTER ACCESS:
 europe
 japan

 TIME INC. SITES:
 CNN NETWORKS:
Networks image
 more networks
 transcripts

 SITE INFO:
 help
 contents
 search
 ad info
 jobs

 WEB SERVICES:

  health > women > story pageAIDSAgingAlternative MedicineCancerChildrenDiet & FitnessMenWomen

Hypertension a greater risk for black women

graphic
 
From Health Correspondent Linda Ciampa

November 1, 1999
Web posted at: 2:39 p.m. EST (1939 GMT)

(CNN) -- New research shows high blood pressure doesn't affect all people equally. In fact, African American women who are overweight and have high blood pressure are at greater risk than any other group for developing heart failure, according to a new study.

"We don't know the cause and effect at this point," said researcher Dr. Stephanie Dunlap of the University of Illinois at Chicago.

"There could be a hormonal difference. It could be that when you combine these three factors together -- being a woman, being African American with high blood pressure and obesity -- it might turn on a certain set of genes that could dispose you to heart failure."

  DOCTOR Q&A:
Read what doctors say about high blood pressure or ask your own questions.

 VIDEO
VideoCNN's Linda Ciampa reports on the high incidence of heart failure in African American women who suffer from high blood pressure.
Windows Media 28K 80K
 

Researchers analyzed data of almost 700 patients in North Carolina. Their study, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, shows that while hypertension was the main cause of heart failure for 40 percent of African Americans, it was the cause of heart failure in just 7 percent of non-African Americans.

"It was surprising to us," Dunlap said. "We've known for a long time that high blood pressure was a risk factor for developing heart failure. What we haven't known is who is at greatest risk, and now we know."

Doctors said several years of uncontrolled hypertension led to heart failure in Ida Myers. Last spring, she received a heart transplant.

"My doctor kept telling me to control my blood pressure, but I never knew I was at higher risk than others," she said.

RELATED STORIES:
Heart disease top killer of women
May 10, 1999
Study: Medications do lower blood pressure
April 21, 1999
Study: Women's hearts handle congestive heart failure better than men's
April 12, 1999
Study: Many high blood pressure patients lack proper treatment
December 30, 1998
High blood pressure: Newest research explores prevention, treatment
September 17, 1998

RELATED SITES:
University of Illinois at Chicago
American College of Cardiology
Mayo Clinic Health Oasis: Health tally -- Know your numbers
Note: Pages will open in a new browser window
External sites are not endorsed by CNN Interactive.

LATEST HEALTH STORIES:
China SARS numbers pass 5,000
Report: Form of HIV in humans by 1940
Fewer infections for back-sleeping babies
Pneumonia vaccine may help heart, too
 LATEST HEADLINES:
SEARCH CNN.com
Enter keyword(s)   go    help

Back to the top   © 2001 Cable News Network. All Rights Reserved.
Terms under which this service is provided to you.
Read our privacy guidelines.