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Special Event

Millennium 2000: Very Few Reports of Y2K Computer Glitches

Aired January 1, 2000 - 7:02 p.m. ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.

JUDY WOODRUFF, CNN ANCHOR: It took billions and billions of dollars to get the world's computers ready for the year 2000, but it appears the work has paid off. There are very few reports of any Y2K computer glitches.

CNN's Miles O'Brien joins us now from the Y2K Center in Washington -- Miles.

MILES O'BRIEN, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Judy, this is apparently what you get for $100 dollars, a room full of P.R. people right behind me, all dressed up and logged in with virtually nothing to report. Here's what we know so far about those isolated problems: Seven nuclear plants reported some problems with systems which control access to their plants, the weather information, that sort of thing. No impact on operations. They have all been fixed.

Several utilities reporting problems with clocks which are synchronized by satellite, which help them manage their power grids. No problems there. Those were reset, no loss of service as a result.

At the FAA, there were a series of problems with some weather reporting systems. The FAA either reset, rebooted, or fixed those systems, and used a different communication path. In all cases, planes flew safely all through those problems. Amtrak reported some problems tracking, if you will, trains in its northeast corridor. That problem was fixed. In the meantime, they used a manual system which had been used in the past.

In short, a lot of isolated problems, but nothing close to the doomsday scenario which had been prophetized. Now, are they ready to declare victory here yet? Well, not just yet. Let's listen in to Y2K czar John Koskinen.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

JOHN KOSKINEN, PRESIDENT'S COUNCIL ON Y2K CONVERSION: On Monday, obviously the markets will open for the first time, and the banks will be up and running. Although, a lot of banks are operating today without any noticeable problems. We do not expect in the United States any significant problems, but again, we cannot guarantee that. But we will not be -- we will be pleased if we get through the day without any problems, which is what our expectation is. But again, I think we will probably find some small glitches, particularly in smaller organizations that may not have done any preparations at all. (END VIDEO CLIP)

O'BRIEN: So the Y2K bunker will be in business for quite some time. The folks here might be a bit underemployed, but no one is complaining.

Miles O'Brien, CNN, live in Washington.

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