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Special Event

Millennium 2000: Y2K Computer Report

Aired January 3, 2000 - 7:05 a.m. ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.

COLLEEN MCEDWARDS, CNN ANCHOR: In Colonie, New York, a video store customer was hit with a $91,000 fee for returning a movie 100 years late. Well, that is one of the few Y2K computer glitches reported so far, and most of them have seemed minor.

Kathleen Koch at the national Y2K center in Washington -- Kathleen.

KATHLEEN KOCH, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Well, Colleen, as you said, so far there have really been only Y2K blips -- things that were so small that they wouldn't even be noticed on a normal day. In Hong Kong, for example, breathalyzers wouldn't work when the date of birth of the person being tested was entered.

And in China, a man ironically writing a series of stories about the millennium bug lost much of his work when his computer crashed and his files were destroyed during the rollover to 2000.

It has been astonishingly quiet, but the president's Y2K adviser maintains still that the $200 billion spent vaccinating the world against the Y2K bug was money well spent.

Today, though, is the real test as to whether or not the world is safe from the Y2K bug. Businesses will be going back to work, switching on their computers, and that's when we'll know whether or not a Y2K bug is lying latent.

Now, a number of auto makers put their companies through sort of a Y2K road test on Sunday. General Motors, DaimlerChrysler, Ford Motor Company all report that their parts and assembly plaths (ph) are up and running flawlessly.

Schools and small businesses are another issue. Many of them are said not to be Y2K ready, so they're going to be watching very closely here from the Y2K center, but they're very optimistic, and they say that, if things go well, they could be powering down their 24-hour operations early -- perhaps as soon as tomorrow. They had been planning on going around the clock through Friday.

Reporting live from the information coordination center, I'm Kathleen Koch. Back to you.

LEON HARRIS, CNN ANCHOR: All right. Thanks, Kathleen.

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