ad info




CNN.com
 MAIN PAGE
 WORLD
 U.S.
 LOCAL
 POLITICS
 WEATHER
 BUSINESS
 SPORTS
 TECHNOLOGY
 SPACE
 HEALTH
 ENTERTAINMENT
 BOOKS
 TRAVEL
 FOOD
 ARTS & STYLE
 NATURE
 IN-DEPTH
 ANALYSIS
 myCNN

 Headline News brief
 news quiz
 daily almanac

  MULTIMEDIA:
 video
 video archive
 audio
 multimedia showcase
 more services

  E-MAIL:
Subscribe to one of our news e-mail lists.
Enter your address:
Or:
Get a free e-mail account

 DISCUSSION:
 message boards
 chat
 feedback

  CNN WEB SITES:
CNN Websites
 AsiaNow
 En Español
 Em Português
 Svenska
 Norge
 Danmark
 Italian

 FASTER ACCESS:
 europe
 japan

 TIME INC. SITES:
 CNN NETWORKS:
Networks image
 more networks
 transcripts

 SITE INFO:
 help
 contents
 search
 ad info
 jobs

 WEB SERVICES:

  Transcripts

Special Event

Millennium 2000: World Keeps Anxious Eye on Y2K as Few Glitches Turn Up

Aired January 3, 2000 - 9:04 a.m. ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.

JIM CLANCY, CNN ANCHOR: As the world returns to business as usual, Y2K experts are keeping an anxious eye on all of the proceedings.

CNN's Rick Lockridge joins us now from the International Y2K Center in Washington with the latest -- Rick.

RICK LOCKRIDGE, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Jim, the headline on CNN.com, this morning, pretty much sums everything up. It is: "Monday a major Y2K test as the U.S. returns to work." That site goes on to report that Asia entered the new millennium in a bullish fashion, with the markets in both Hong Kong and Singapore setting new records. The market in Frankfurt closed 20 points higher, this morning, and the market in Paris up 60 points.

Now, let's take another look at some of the Web coverage on this day. We'll start over here with the "Wall Street Journal's" page: "Federal officials," this says, "expect few glitches to emerge." However, that article goes on to point out that those officials, quote, "remain concerned about small, private firms, many of whom did nothing to address possible Y2K-related problems." It also says most states will not know how well they fared until today.

Moving onto Chicago, where the Mercantile Exchange was one of the first Western markets to open -- that was last night at 6:30 Eastern Time -- and it opened uneventfully, I might add. This article says, the bug is, quote, "nowhere to be seen."

Now let's move over to the International Y2K Cooperation Center site, which is what this place is all about. And there we see it, as we have since the beginning of this weekend, green lights all across the board, up and down, for all 120-or-so countries that are reporting in. Continued success for the world handling this Y2K rollover.

Now, the director of the Y2K Cooperation Center is Bruce McConnell. We asked him just a few moments ago about his outlook on this very important Monday.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

BRUCE MCCONNELL, DIR., Y2K COOPERATION CENTER: I think what it means is that we are not going to see any major Y2K problems. We're going to continue to stay on the lookout for the minor glitches, but we're looking at success, and we're very -- very excited about it.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

LOCKRIDGE: However, as many as 80 percent of the world's computer will be switched on for the first time today since the rollover, and among those are many of the mainframes in which this problem was rooted to begin with. So, we'll still be watching out for that, but with each passing hour it looks like we're closer and closer to being out of the woods on this one.

More later from the International Y2K Center here in Washington. For now, I'm Rick Lockridge. Back to you.

DARYN KAGAN, CNN ANCHOR: Thank you, Rick.

TO ORDER A VIDEO OF THIS TRANSCRIPT, PLEASE CALL 800-CNN-NEWS OR USE OUR SECURE ONLINE ORDER FORM LOCATED AT www.fdch.com

  ArrowCLICK HERE FOR TODAY'S TOPICS AND GUESTS
ArrowCLICK HERE FOR CNN PROGRAM SCHEDULES
SEARCH CNN.com
Enter keyword(s)   go    help

Back to the top   © 2001 Cable News Network. All Rights Reserved.
Terms under which this service is provided to you.
Read our privacy guidelines.