ad info




CNN.com
 MAIN PAGE
 WORLD
 U.S.
 LOCAL
 POLITICS
 WEATHER
 BUSINESS
 SPORTS
 TECHNOLOGY
 SPACE
 HEALTH
 ENTERTAINMENT
 BOOKS
 TRAVEL
 FOOD
 ARTS & STYLE
 NATURE
 IN-DEPTH
 ANALYSIS
 myCNN

 Headline News brief
 news quiz
 daily almanac

  MULTIMEDIA:
 video
 video archive
 audio
 multimedia showcase
 more services

  E-MAIL:
Subscribe to one of our news e-mail lists.
Enter your address:
Or:
Get a free e-mail account

 DISCUSSION:
 message boards
 chat
 feedback

  CNN WEB SITES:
CNN Websites
 AsiaNow
 En Español
 Em Português
 Svenska
 Norge
 Danmark
 Italian

 FASTER ACCESS:
 europe
 japan

 TIME INC. SITES:
 CNN NETWORKS:
Networks image
 more networks
 transcripts

 SITE INFO:
 help
 contents
 search
 ad info
 jobs

 WEB SERVICES:

  Transcripts

Special Event

Millennium 2000: A Look at Some Gadgets That Could Greatly Affect Our Lives

Aired January 3, 2000 - 6:27 p.m. ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.

WOLF BLITZER, CNN ANCHOR: Keeping up with all of the changes in technology can be difficult. It seems there's always something faster, smaller and better on the market.

JOIE CHEN, CNN ANCHOR: CNN's Allison Tom takes a look at some of the devices that are coming our way and how they could affect all of our lives.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

ALLISON TOM, CNN CORRESPONDENT (voice-over): A new wave of technology gadgets could change the way consumers communicate and get information. One place it has already taken hold is in Finland, where almost two-thirds of the population uses mobile phones, and many of them tap into the Internet using wireless services.

KEVIN HAUSE, INTERNATIONAL DATA CORPORATION: We're going to see a variety of these other non-PC devices start to penetrate the home in far greater numbers than PCs.

TOM: By 2002, analysts predict, many of these non-PC devices will be more commonly used than desktop PCs. they will be less costly and offer quick and easy access to the Web.

a system called Wireless Application Protocol -- also known as WAP -- makes it all possible. For instance, it'll send you the text and graphics on a Web page so that you can read it on your cell phone. And eventually, the technology could create an innovative way for people to think and work outside of the box.

STEVEN LUHAR, SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION MUSEUM OF AMERICAN HISTORY: In the future, computers will simply be everywhere. You won't think of a computer as a box on your desk, but they'll be built into all sorts of things.

TOM: Things like your car or your home. These intelligent devices will talk to each other with complete mobility. But a global standard is needed to make this happen. One of the largest technology companies is developing just that.

PETER HORTENSIUS, IBM: What we'll be seeing very shortly is that these different computers inside our stoves, refrigerators, automobiles, everything, will start to be able to communicate with each other.

TOM: In theory, different devices will work together seamlessly, making computers practically invisible.

JOHN GAGE, SUN MICROSYSTEMS: Everything in technology changes rapidly. As things become smaller and cheaper, they become ubiquitous. That's what is happening with computers today.

And in the not-too-distant future, computers may become a lot like electric motors and appliances like these, which were once big and noisy.

(voice-over): But many say, despite these new technologies, the future of the personal computer is still bright. Just as television did not completely replace radio, new technologies are not likely to fully replace PCs, even as more cutting-edge types of computers integrate into almost every aspect of our lives.

Allison Tom, CNN, Atlanta.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

TO ORDER A VIDEO OF THIS TRANSCRIPT, PLEASE CALL 800-CNN-NEWS OR USE OUR SECURE ONLINE ORDER FORM LOCATED AT www.fdch.com

  ArrowCLICK HERE FOR TODAY'S TOPICS AND GUESTS
ArrowCLICK HERE FOR CNN PROGRAM SCHEDULES
SEARCH CNN.com
Enter keyword(s)   go    help

Back to the top   © 2001 Cable News Network. All Rights Reserved.
Terms under which this service is provided to you.
Read our privacy guidelines.