ad info




CNN.com
 MAIN PAGE
 WORLD
 U.S.
 LOCAL
 POLITICS
 WEATHER
 BUSINESS
 SPORTS
 TECHNOLOGY
 SPACE
 HEALTH
 ENTERTAINMENT
 BOOKS
 TRAVEL
 FOOD
 ARTS & STYLE
 NATURE
 IN-DEPTH
 ANALYSIS
 myCNN

 Headline News brief
 news quiz
 daily almanac

  MULTIMEDIA:
 video
 video archive
 audio
 multimedia showcase
 more services

  E-MAIL:
Subscribe to one of our news e-mail lists.
Enter your address:
Or:
Get a free e-mail account

 DISCUSSION:
 message boards
 chat
 feedback

  CNN WEB SITES:
CNN Websites
 AsiaNow
 En Español
 Em Português
 Svenska
 Norge
 Danmark
 Italian

 FASTER ACCESS:
 europe
 japan

 TIME INC. SITES:
 CNN NETWORKS:
Networks image
 more networks
 transcripts

 SITE INFO:
 help
 contents
 search
 ad info
 jobs

 WEB SERVICES:

  Transcripts

CNN Today

Hundreds of Families Still Trying to Move Out of Government- Supplied Trailers in North Carolina

Aired January 20, 2000 - 2:28 p.m. ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.

LOU WATERS, CNN ANCHOR: For hundreds of families hit hard by last fall's flooding in North Carolina, life still is a waiting game. Four months after the floods, they're still trying to get permanent housing and get out of government-supplied trailers.

CNN's Brian Cabell has one family story in Rocky Mountain, North Carolina.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: You've got something to light your pilot light with?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Yes.

BRIAN CABELL, CNN CORRESPONDENT (voice-over): It's cold in Rocky Mountain, North Carolina, and once again Vivian (ph) King's travel trailer has run out of propane. That's a big problem if you have a family of four.

The Kings were flooded out of their apartment last September in the aftermath of Hurricane Floyd, and now, four months later, they're still here in a tiny camper.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I've got to do what I've got to do to survive, and this is not the worst place where to be.

CABELL: Worse, she says, would be out on the street. Still, 150 feet of living space isn't much for her and her three children: 16- year-old Sharice (ph), six-year-old Andrea (ph) and nine-year-old Lance.

LANCE KING: It's a big family, right, so we can't hardly move and plus you got all this stuff in here.

CABELL: They have one bed on one side of the camper, a bunk bed on the other, a tiny bathroom and a kitchen in between.

Ms. King lost her job as a waitress when her restaurant was flooded. He hopes to get a new job soon and then move out into less- cramped quarters.

Two-thousands families awaiting new, permanent housing still live in these trailers provided by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. An estimated 17,000 homes in North Carolina were severely damaged by last fall's flooding. More than 7,000 will likely have to be demolished.

(on camera): But increasingly, flooded-out residents are now moving back to new homes, to rebuilt homes, to homes now elevated off the ground, like this one.

(voice-over): Homeowner Tommy Parisher (ph) tore down his old flooded home, trucked in dirt to raise the ground level two feet, then raised his mobile home two more feet, all this in preparation for the next flood, and he started it just days after his family was driven from their home.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: And I just wanted to get back in and get back to normal, you know, more or less normal and get back, actually, to our life.

CABELL: That's the goal of Vivian King as well. She'll need just a little more time, a little more money.

Brian Cabell, CNN, Rocky Mountain, North Carolina.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

TO ORDER A VIDEO OF THIS TRANSCRIPT, PLEASE CALL 800-CNN-NEWS OR USE OUR SECURE ONLINE ORDER FORM LOCATED AT www.fdch.com

  ArrowCLICK HERE FOR TODAY'S TOPICS AND GUESTS
ArrowCLICK HERE FOR CNN PROGRAM SCHEDULES
SEARCH CNN.com
Enter keyword(s)   go    help

Back to the top   © 2001 Cable News Network. All Rights Reserved.
Terms under which this service is provided to you.
Read our privacy guidelines.