ad info




CNN.com
 MAIN PAGE
 WORLD
 U.S.
 LOCAL
 POLITICS
 WEATHER
 BUSINESS
 SPORTS
 TECHNOLOGY
 SPACE
 HEALTH
 ENTERTAINMENT
 BOOKS
 TRAVEL
 FOOD
 ARTS & STYLE
 NATURE
 IN-DEPTH
 ANALYSIS
 myCNN

 Headline News brief
 news quiz
 daily almanac

  MULTIMEDIA:
 video
 video archive
 audio
 multimedia showcase
 more services

  E-MAIL:
Subscribe to one of our news e-mail lists.
Enter your address:
Or:
Get a free e-mail account

 DISCUSSION:
 message boards
 chat
 feedback

  CNN WEB SITES:
CNN Websites
 AsiaNow
 En Español
 Em Português
 Svenska
 Norge
 Danmark
 Italian

 FASTER ACCESS:
 europe
 japan

 TIME INC. SITES:
 CNN NETWORKS:
Networks image
 more networks
 transcripts

 SITE INFO:
 help
 contents
 search
 ad info
 jobs

 WEB SERVICES:

  Transcripts

Special Event

Space Shuttle Endeavour Launches Into 11-Day Mission to Map Earth

Aired February 11, 2000 - 12:42 p.m. ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.

JEANNE MESERVE, CNN ANCHOR: I'm going to toss it over to Miles O'Brien at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Miles, what's the latest on the launch.

MILES O'BRIEN, CNN SPACE CORRESPONDENT: Jeanne, not much time to talk. We'll just listen in to NASA. About 30 seconds to the launch of the space shuttle Endeavour. Six-person crew aboard, a $600 million ambitious radar mapping mission.

Let's listen in to NASA commentator Joel Wells (ph) and the radio communications between the crew and the ground controllers.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Twelve, eleven, ten, nine, eight, seven -- we have a go for ignition -- four, three, two, one, booster ignition, and liftoff of space shuttle Endeavour on a 21st century mission placing Earth back on the map.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Roger, roll, Endeavour.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: And we're rolling on a course northeast away from the Kennedy Space Center. (UNINTELLIGIBLE) it will take it above 95 percent of the world's population during its mission. Endeavour's speed already 300 miles per hour, altitude one mile.

Three engines on Endeavour now throttling back to two-thirds throttle as they prepare to go through the Earth's (UNINTELLIGIBLE).

O'BRIEN: (OFF MIKE) NASA's mission control in Houston. As you look at a closeup shot, the twin solid rocket boosters doing most of the work right now, about 80 percent of the thrust.

The famous throttle-up call indicating a portion of time after which the space shuttle increases its throttles after the atmosphere has thinned out somewhat and the weight of the space shuttle has decreased. The throttles are purposely throttled back, and they are accelerated to 104 percent of their capability. Now a minute and 37 seconds into this flight, the solid rocket boosters still attached. The six-person crew aboard right now getting a very, very rough ride, feeling the effects of increasing G loads, which is the pressure of gravity against their bodies.

And there you see the solid rocket boosters' separation, critical moment in the ascent of a space shuttle into orbit, about two minutes after the launch, as expected. It takes about eight-and-a-half minutes for the space shuttle to attain orbit, right now riding on the main engines, that solid -- excuse me, the external tank still attached.

So far exactly what NASA would have hoped for on a picture- perfect day here at the Kennedy Space Center, thus beginning an 11-day shuttle radar topography mission, the crew attempting to map about 70 percent of the Earth's surface with a special radar device which will provide three-dimensional maps for the military and for scientists.

Now indicated, when they say two-engine tal (ph) indicating transatlantic abort scenarios, telling the crew as they go higher, and if the shuttle continues to perform as expected, they have additional options available to them in the way of aborts. But so far, nothing to indicate they would need to abort in any way. So far, things operating as exactly as NASA would hope it.

Once again, an 11-day mission. We will be following it all throughout as always. The six-person crew conducting an ambitious effort to map most of the world in all of 10 days time.

Miles O'Brien, CNN, reporting live from the Kennedy Space Center -- Jeanne.

MESERVE: Thank you, Miles.

TO ORDER A VIDEO OF THIS TRANSCRIPT, PLEASE CALL 800-CNN-NEWS OR USE OUR SECURE ONLINE ORDER FORM LOCATED AT www.fdch.com

  ArrowCLICK HERE FOR TODAY'S TOPICS AND GUESTS
ArrowCLICK HERE FOR CNN PROGRAM SCHEDULES
SEARCH CNN.com
Enter keyword(s)   go    help

Back to the top   © 2001 Cable News Network. All Rights Reserved.
Terms under which this service is provided to you.
Read our privacy guidelines.