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Gallup Poll: Overall Favorable Image of Al Gore Slipping

Aired June 27, 2000 - 1:29 p.m. ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.

LOU WATERS, CNN ANCHOR: With a power plant as his backdrop, Vice President Gore today unveiled a long-term plan that aims to wean the nation away from fossil fuels. Gore proposed tax breaks for companies that invest in so-called green technology: projects that save oil, reduce pollution or both. The Democratic presidential hopeful also advocates increased drilling for natural gas in the Gulf of Mexico.

NATALIE ALLEN, CNN ANCHOR: The latest CNN/"USA Today"/Gallup poll shows Vice President Gore slipping in the presidential race.

Gallup Poll Editor in Chief Frank Newport joins us from Princeton, New Jersey -- Frank.

FRANK NEWPORT, EDITOR IN CHIEF, GALLUP POLL: Natalie, indeed that's right. A lot of people ask us: Well, does it really matter where the candidates are in this point in the race? After all, November is quite a ways away. It does in a way, because it tells us, we think, how the American public is reacting to the campaign issues that are being put forth now. And the bottom line is, try as he might, Al Gore has not been able to persuade more Americans to say they would vote for him, than say they would vote for Texas Governor George W. Bush, essentially all year long.

It has been very steady in a very broad sense. This maps it from January through this past weekend among likely voters and that top line is the percent who would vote for George W. Bush, the bottom line is Al Gore. And it's gone up and down in terms of the actual margin. As you mentioned, this past weekend it's the largest it's been since mid-January, 13 percentage points; 52 percent say they'd vote for Bush, 39 percent say they'd vote for Al Gore. So the margin has varied, as I say, but generally speaking, Bush maintains his lead overall.

Some things are happening that are not necessarily favorable for Al Gore. We can show you among the core constituency where he needs to do well, Democrats and women he's actually doing less well than he was before. Gore does not get as high a percent of the Democratic vote as George W. does in the Republican vote. And the gender gap, which still gives an advantage to Al Gore, is not operating as positively as it was. Bush is up among women, his strength is really men. But he's up among women and that's not a good sign for Al Gore overall.

Plus, overall favorable image of Al Gore is slipping some, maybe a result of what we've been seeing in terms of the fund-raising controversy. And we did ask the public about that this past weekend as well, compared to April, we can show here, we said: Did Al Gore, in terms of the fund-raising in 1996, do something unethical or illegal? It was split back in April, but this past weekend you can see 51 percent, yes, 23 percent say, no. The rest don't have an answer. So all in all, what we're finding here is maybe the publicity surrounding the fund-raising controversy is having some impact on the race. That's where the public stands right now.

Lou, Natalie, back to you.

ALLEN: Frank, thank you.

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