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CNN Today

Marion Jones Wins Gold Medal Number Two, Sets her Sights on Number Three

Aired September 28, 2000 - 1:26 p.m. ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.

NATALIE ALLEN, CNN ANCHOR: American track and field star Marion Jones has picked up her second gold medal. Nick Charles of CNN/"Sports Illustrated" has that and today's other Olympic highlights from Sydney.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

NICK CHARLES, CNN CORRESPONDENT (on camera): Marion Jones is the world's fastest woman. Who punctuated that point at these games with her gold medal run in the 100. But, this is a driven women with higher ambitions and so, Thursday night at Stadium Australia, Jones stretched her blazing speed and shot to the gold medal in the 200.

(voice-over): Jones burst from the blocks and early in the turn bolted into second gear. Tearing through the curve and once they straightened for home, the American speed queen demolished the field as she rocketed home in 21.84. Marion Jones struck like lightning again and won her second gold medal of the games.

From expected to unexpected, Konstantinos Kenteris of Greece surprised the 200 meter men's field that was missing both Maurice Green and Michael Johnson. The Greek told the gold, Darren Campbell the silver, Ato Boldon got the bronze, while American champion John Capel finished dead last.

The story at women's' doubles Thursday was more gold for the United States and tennis' most dynamic duo. The Williams sisters were overwhelming again. And I spoke with Venus and Serena about what makes this victory different.

VENUS WILLIAMS, TENNIS GOLD MEDALIST: We get to do it together as sisters and as a family, and we do everything together. So, winning the gold together is just something we we're going to -- we've done together, just like everything else.

CHARLES: Did you think about this as a child, perhaps?

SERENA WILLIAMS: You know, I just see all the time people winning Olympic medals, not usually in tennis, unfortunately, but in just a lot of other events, and just to be among those athletes, those great athletes who have done the same, is really special for both Venus and I. CHARLES: Heartbreak and a silver medal for the defending Olympic champion U.S. women's' soccer team, Tiffany Milbrett scored her second of the night to catch Norway in injury time. But Dagny Mellgren scored on a defensive lapse 12 minutes into extra time as the Norwegians beat their arch-rivals and won the gold medal.

JULIE FOUDY, U.S. SOCCER TEAM: At first it was just a lot hugs and quiet and tears and then we got together in the locker room before we came out to do some media and just said that, you know, one of the things that we're so proud about with this group is we never stop fighting. You know, that's always been such a trademark of ours, is we never give up. We said: Hold your heads up. You know, we didn't lose the gold, we won a silver.

CHARLES: This is the first Olympics to award medals for tae kwon do. And the U.S. made their first effort a golden one when Steven Lopez of Sugarland, Texas, came from behind to defeat the South Korean champion.

STEVEN LOPEZ, TAE KWON DO GOLD MEDALIST: My dream is to stay on the point of the first place on the very top, seeing my American flag above all the rest, hearing the National Anthem, that's something that I've dreamt and, especially, why I've been here, you know, since September the fourth. Every night I have visualized and visualized and visualized that same -- same exact image and that exact image is what took place today. So, my dreams, my daydreams became a reality today.

CHARLES: Finally, back to where we began: Marion Jones. She's two for two now and already braced for her next challenge. It's Friday night in the women's long jump, featuring a field that includes Tatiana Katova (ph) and Theona May (ph), the two women who have leaped the longest this year.

Nobody said winning five gold medals was supposed to be easy.

In Sydney, Australia. I'm Nick Charles.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

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