ad info

 
CNN.comTranscripts
 
Editions | myCNN | Video | Audio | Headline News Brief | Feedback  

 

  Search
 
 

 

TOP STORIES

Bush signs order opening 'faith-based' charity office for business

Rescues continue 4 days after devastating India earthquake

DaimlerChrysler employees join rapidly swelling ranks of laid-off U.S. workers

Disney's GO.com is a goner

(MORE)

MARKETS
4:30pm ET, 4/16
144.70
8257.60
3.71
1394.72
10.90
879.91
 


WORLD

U.S.

POLITICS

LAW

TECHNOLOGY

ENTERTAINMENT

 
TRAVEL

ARTS & STYLE



(MORE HEADLINES)
 
CNN Websites
Networks image


CNN Today

Despite Israeli-Palestinian Cease-Fire, Road to Mideast Peace is Rocky

Aired October 17, 2000 - 1:01 p.m. ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.

LOU WATERS, CNN ANCHOR: Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak and the Palestinian leader Arafat have agreed to a cease-fire; but will that really stop the violence consuming their region? That's an open question following the conclusion of the Sharm el-Sheikh summit in Egypt.

CNN's John King has the latest on the story.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

JOHN KING, CNN SENIOR WHITE HOUSE CORRESPONDENT (voice-over): The smiles came suddenly. The question now, whether their summit solution brings a quick end to the violence.

Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak and Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat signed on, but said nothing; leaving the man who brokered the deal to explain it.

WILLIAM JEFFERSON CLINTON, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES: Both sides have agreed to issue public statements unequivocally calling for an end of violence. They also agreed to take immediate, concrete measures to end the current confrontation, eliminate points of friction, ensure an end to violence and incitement, maintain calm and prevent recurrence of recent events.

KING: Translation: cease-fire.

Prime Minister Barak agreed to pull back Israeli troops from Palestinian territories and to reopen the Gaza airport. Mr. Arafat promised to improve security and to round up Hamas militants freed from jail these past two weeks.

For both, it will be a tough sell back home; and Egypt's president tried to help.

HOSNI MUBARAK, EGYPTIAN PRESIDENT (through translator): The outcome reached in this summit may not meet the expectations of our peoples; however, they constitute, at the same time, a basis on which we can build on.

KING: The agreement was forged of two Clinton trademarks: resilience and compromise. Five meetings with Mr. Barak, the most critical running until 4:00 a.m. Five sit-downs with Mr. Arafat, this one with President Mubarak to seal the deal. The compromises could soon test the resolve for calm.

Mr. Arafat bowed to pressure and agreed to let the United States lead the inquiry into the recent violence, but the details are yet to be worked out. And instead of Barak's call for a firm date to resume peace talks, negotiators will meet in two weeks or so to test the mood.

CLINTON: We have made important commitments here today against the backdrop of tragedy and crisis. We should have no illusions about the difficulties ahead.

KING: Mr. Clinton headed home convinced he had made a difference.

(on camera): The test will come quickly; the success of this summit to be judged most of all by whether Mr. Arafat and Mr. Barak can bring a swift end to the violence. As one U.S. official put it, we need them to work together now; getting them to trust each other again will have to wait.

John King, CNN, Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

TO ORDER A VIDEO OF THIS TRANSCRIPT, PLEASE CALL 800-CNN-NEWS OR USE OUR SECURE ONLINE ORDER FORM LOCATED AT www.fdch.com

 Search   


Back to the top  © 2001 Cable News Network. All Rights Reserved.
Terms under which this service is provided to you.
Read our privacy guidelines.