ad info

 
CNN.comTranscripts
 
Editions | myCNN | Video | Audio | Headline News Brief | Feedback  

 

  Search
 
 

 

TOP STORIES

Bush signs order opening 'faith-based' charity office for business

Rescues continue 4 days after devastating India earthquake

DaimlerChrysler employees join rapidly swelling ranks of laid-off U.S. workers

Disney's GO.com is a goner

(MORE)

MARKETS
4:30pm ET, 4/16
144.70
8257.60
3.71
1394.72
10.90
879.91
 


WORLD

U.S.

POLITICS

LAW

TECHNOLOGY

ENTERTAINMENT

 
TRAVEL

ARTS & STYLE



(MORE HEADLINES)
 
CNN Websites
Networks image


CNN Today

Gore and Bush Hit Final Campaign Stretch

Aired October 30, 2000 - 1:33 p.m. ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.

LOU WATERS, CNN ANCHOR: The hour's top story, indeed the week's top story is the sprint to the finish line in election 2000. Democratic contender Al Gore spends the day in Michigan and Wisconsin, two states whose 29 electoral votes are up for grabs. Republican hopeful George W. Bush is courting five electoral votes in New Mexico and, especially, the 54 of them in California. Bush insists Gore's lock on the Golden State is slipping, though the vice president still leads in the statewide polls.

Joining us now from Washington, CNN senior political analyst Bill Schneider.

What is going on in California? We have the "San Francisco Examiner"/KTVU poll with Gore ahead 49 percent to 39 percent, and yet Gore -- the Bush campaign is saying that Gore is slipping there. What's actually happening there in California?

WILLIAM SCHNEIDER, CNN SENIOR POLITICAL ANALYST: Well, there's been a little bit of slippage. Gore had been ahead in the teens somewhere, now it's slipping -- you just cited 10 points, some other polls show 7 or 8 points -- but no poll has ever shown Gore losing California, or even California being neck and neck.

What's going on there, Lou, is 52 contests for the House of Representatives, that's about 1/8 of the membership of the House of Representatives at stake at one state: California. And that state is crucial. There are about six tight contests in California that could determine control of Congress, and Bush is, I think, carrying out an obligation to his party not to abandon California as Bob Dole and as his father did in the last two elections so that the Republicans there essentially find themselves in a hopeless situation.

WATERS: So this is not about any realistic chance for the Republicans to take California for the presidential race?

SCHNEIDER: Well, I suppose they can manage -- they've managed to convince themselves there is an outside chance they could take California. I wouldn't say it's likely, but look, you know, surprising things have happened and we've still got nine -- eight days to go.

WATERS: We have the toss-up states. We have Bush -- we just heard from him -- he is in Albuquerque, very few electoral votes there. We have Gore in Green Bay, Wisconsin, here in just a few minutes, Joe Lieberman is at the microphone now. We're going to hear from the vice president shortly.

What is the strategy here in these final days of the campaign in picking these spots that the campaigns are picking for the candidates to appear?

SCHNEIDER: Well, in part, one word: Nader. Ralph Nader is very strong in New Mexico, which has elected Greens in the past. That's -- Ralph Nader is the Green Party candidate.

In Wisconsin and in Michigan, Ralph Nader is a strong candidate and he -- I mean, he's making a difference, because the race is otherwise very close between Bush and Gore, and I think the Democrats are very nervous that they have to get to those states and get the message out not only that Gore is good on the Nader issues, like environmental protection and campaign finance reform, but other people -- not Al Gore -- but other people are saying a vote for Nader is a vote to take your state's electoral votes and hand them over to George Bush.

WATERS: One question about the Missouri Senate race, we have a Zogby poll today saying that Mel Carnahan, who perished in that plane crash October 16, is ahead of John Ashcroft 50 percent to 43 percent, and we apparently are going to hear from his widow in just a few minutes, who says she will accept the governor's appointment to the Carnahan seat if he should win this election. What do you make of that?

SCHNEIDER: Well, it's pretty amazing. I mean, it looked like it -- when the governor died tragically in that plane crash two weeks ago that the seat was conceded to the Republican, to the incumbent John Ashcroft -- it was a neck and neck race and now that he's deceased the governor is running ahead. His name cannot be removed from the ballot. There are legal questions about whether people can elect a ghost. There are questions of propriety, about his widow taking the seat. How does the press cover this election? I mean, do they cover the widow like a candidate, a grieving widow?

There are all kinds of issues here, but the bottom line is the Democrats insist they are not giving up on this seat. They think they can hold it for the Democrats, or win the seats for the Democrats. John Ashcroft isn't all that unpopular, but what we are seeing is a surge of sympathy for a governor.

WATERS: All right, Bill Schneider in Washington, we'll talk again.

TO ORDER A VIDEO OF THIS TRANSCRIPT, PLEASE CALL 800-CNN-NEWS OR USE OUR SECURE ONLINE ORDER FORM LOCATED AT www.fdch.com

 Search   


Back to the top  © 2001 Cable News Network. All Rights Reserved.
Terms under which this service is provided to you.
Read our privacy guidelines.