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Al Gore Outlines His Campaign's 'Closing Arguments'

Aired October 30, 2000 - 2:11 p.m. ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.

NATALIE ALLEN, CNN ANCHOR: Well, right now, the vice president is still speaking at a rally in Green Bay, Wisconsin that we brought you: an area where voters still apparently have not made up their minds. Eleven electoral votes are up for grabs in that state, which Gore is crisscrossing today by bus. Also aboard, his running mate, who's standing with him at this rally that we've been seeing, Senator Joe Lieberman, and their wives.

And traveling with the Gore campaign is CNN's Jonathan Karl. He joins us by phone from the latest Gore rally.

And Jonathan, what about Al Gore? Anything special on his plate to try to sway some of these undecided voters?

JONATHAN KARL, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Well, Vice President Gore this morning outlined what he was calling, what his campaign is calling the closing arguments, the very strongest case that he can make for a Gore presidency.

And it really came down to this, one line in his speech, where he said -- quote -- "Let me be clear: Continuing our strong economy is my overriding commitment. Everything else depends on it."

So after hop-scotching from theme to theme, from issue to issue over the course of this campaign, Vice President Gore is coming back to almost exactly the theme that we heard in 1988 when another incumbent vice president was running for president, George W. Bush's father.

You remember back then the theme was, stay the course. Essentially, what Gore's saying now is it comes down to prosperity. If you think America is better off today, let's stay the course, echoing, you know, Vice President Bush's argument in 1988: stay the course, don't risk change and go back to -- to economic recession.

ALLEN: Anyone at the Gore campaign expressing concern about whether Al Gore really has California in a lockbox?

(LAUGHTER)

KARL: Well, they never quite put it that way. I like that, though.

The Gore campaign is insisting that California is safe, they're insisting that their own polls show that George W. Bush has very little movement out there.

But I will note that the vice president is going out to California. He's going to be out there on Tuesday. Originally, the campaign said it was strictly to appear on the "Jay Leno Show," which, of course, reaches an audience far beyond California. But they are also going to have a major rally at UCLA.

So the Gore campaign still not advertising in California. As a matter of fact, the Democratic National Committee and the Gore campaign haven't had any campaign ads on the air in California. But they are going there and they will be doing a campaign stop.

So while they insist they really aren't worried about it, you have to look at this trip to California as a sign that at least they're aware they've got to pay attention to what's happening there, because there has been some clear movement toward Bush in California even if it's been limited movement. And there is no poll in California that has actually given Bush a lead.

ALLEN: All right, Jonathan Karl. Thanks so much, Jonathan, on the trail with Al Gore.

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