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Special Event

Gore Holds Rally in St. Louis, Missouri

Aired November 6, 2000 - 1:36 p.m. ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.

NATALIE ALLEN, CNN ANCHOR: Let's see what issues Al Gore is talking about one day before the election. He has taken the microphone at a rally in St. Louis. He just predicted he will carry Missouri and go to the White House.

Let's listen in for a few moments.

(JOINED IN PROGRESS)

VICE PRES. AL GORE (D), PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: ... the next governor of the state of Missouri, Bob Holden.

(APPLAUSE)

Bob, the plane just landed, and Laurie and the boys preceded you on stage.

Dick and Jane Gephardt have been close friends to Tipper and me for 24 years now.

Lacy Clay's going to be the next congressman from this district.

And we're proud of you, man. We're proud of you.

(APPLAUSE)

Everywhere we've been we felt this kind of enthusiasm. And I believe the reason is that you know it makes a difference whether or not you have a president who's going to fight for you instead of making it just making it sound good and actually do what the special interests want.

(APPLAUSE)

I think we need to keep our prosperity going and extend it to include everyone in this country, so that it benefits not just a few, but all of our families.

Now, my opponent, Governor Bush, likes to say that we were a lot better off eight years ago than we are today.

AUDIENCE: No.

GORE: And I don't agree with that either. He recommends on the basis of that judgment of history that we should go back to the Bush- Quayle policies of eight years ago.

AUDIENCE: No.

GORE: But I remember, as you do, that we had the highest deficits in history, the national debt was multiplied four times over. We're still paying annual interest on that debt they built up. It's more than anything in the budget, except Social Security and defense, bigger than Medicare. They had repeated recessions, threw people out of work, crime rates went up.

Listen, you gave Bill Clinton and me a chance to bring change to this country.

(APPLAUSE)

And Dick Gephardt organized the one-vote margin in the House of Representatives and carried it there.

I had the honor of casting the tie-breaking vote in the Senate, and we won it there.

And when that new plan went into effect, we started changes that have seen us -- well, instead of having the biggest deficits, we've now got the biggest surpluses. And instead of a triple-dip recession, we've seen a tripling of the market. Instead of high unemployment, we've got the lowest African-American unemployment ever, the lowest Latino unemployment ever, 22 million new jobs, and the strongest economy in the 224-year history of the United States of America.

(APPLAUSE)

But it's not good enough. There are too many who are not participating. I'm not satisfied.

You ain't seen nothing yet. We're going to do even better.

(APPLAUSE)

But you need to know, there is a big difference in this election. We're at a fork in the road. We can go one direction or the other. We can continue the prosperity, we can balance the budget and pay down the debt. I want to pay off the debt so these kids don't have that burden on their shoulders, so we can free them up to realize their potential.

(APPLAUSE)

We can have a new incentive for young workers to save and invest on their own. We can have the right kinds of priorities.

Or we can go in the other direction.

AUDIENCE: No.

GORE: Now, Governor Bush is recommending, as the centerpiece of his plan, a gigantic $1.6 trillion tax cut, mainly to the wealthy, almost half of it to the wealthiest 1 percent. That comes from his own budget figures.

Now, I do not begrudge those folks a tax cut. What makes it mistake is not only that it's unfair, it puts us back into deficits and raises interest rates and threatens to take us back to the recessions of the past.

We've been there, done that, still paying the bill. We're not going back. We're going forward.

(APPLAUSE)

Are you with me?

AUDIENCE: Yes.

(APPLAUSE)

GORE: Governor Bush would propose, under his plan, to spend more money on tax cuts to the top 1 percent than all of his new proposals for education, health care and national defense combined.

Now, those priorities are wrong for America. But you have the decision right here in the Show Me state. You have the ability to show him what you want in the way of America's future.

(APPLAUSE)

I believe that we ought to have the right kind of priorities. And for me, in this time of great change, when knowledge is the key to the future, teachers are the locksmiths that can put that key into the hands of every child. I think that it's time to start treating teachers like the professionals they are and reduce the class size and modernize the schools.

(APPLAUSE)

I think it's time for a commitment to universal preschool when the children's minds are being enriched at a young age.

And here's something else that I want to make happen, along with Dick Gephardt and the leaders that we rely on there, I will make college tuition mostly tax deductible for every middle class family.

(APPLAUSE)

$10,000 a year.

(APPLAUSE)

Are you with me?

AUDIENCE: Yes.

GORE: You see, I don't go along with tax cut for the very wealthy; I think we need middle class tax cuts for the people who have the hardest time paying taxes, making ends meet, making car payments and house payments and doing right by their kids.

(APPLAUSE)

And then I believe we've got to address the issue of retirement security. We have to protect Social Security. I told you about the savings incentive that I've proposed. It comes in addition to Social Security, not at the expense of Social Security.

And then I will put Social Security in a lockbox that cannot be opened to take the money out. I'll veto anything that takes money out of Social Security for anything other than Social Security.

(APPLAUSE)

Now, Governor Bush has proposed taking a trillion dollars out of the Social Security trust fund to try to privatize a big part it, and he's promised it two different groups of people: to young workers for the kind of savings incentive that I give on top of Social Security. But he promises it out of the trust fund, and then he promises the same trillion dollars to seniors to keep from cutting their benefits.

Now, I know that one plus one equals two, but $1 trillion promised to two different groups of people doesn't add up unless you're using...

AUDIENCE: Fuzzy math.

GORE: We've been there. We used "fuzzy math." We're not going to use it again. We're going forward. We're not going back. We're not going to put Social Security at risk.

(APPLAUSE)

Now, a few days ago -- three days ago, Governor Bush was trying to defend his proposal, and he criticized those of us who are against that privatization plan, and said that we're just scared of it. And then he said, "What do they think Social Security is, some kind of federal program?"

(LAUGHTER)

Yeah.

(LAUGHTER)

And a damn good one, too. And we're going to save it.

(APPLAUSE)

Are you with me?

AUDIENCE: Yes.

(APPLAUSE)

GORE: When it comes to the environment, Governor Bush wants to open up the Alaska National Wildlife Refuge to the oil companies and have drilling up there. I'm opposed to that.

He put a lobbyist for the polluters in charge of the environmental laws in Texas and made some of them voluntary, and now they have fallen to last place in terms of a clean environment. They've got the worst industrial air pollution.

They have the smoggiest state and the smoggiest city.

Houston, we have a problem, and we don't want that problem nationwide. We don't want to see the St. Louis skyline be like the Houston skyline.

ALLEN: Al Gore, in St. Louis. Missouri, according to the polls, is a state that is leaning towards Bush, looking good for George W. Bush. Al Gore is sounding confident and still trying to drum up votes here one day before the election. We heard from him.

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