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Election Day 2000: Voters Seem to be Turning Out in Droves

Aired November 7, 2000 - 2:23 p.m. ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.

NATALIE ALLEN, CNN ANCHOR: With this presidential race running as tight as it is, one deciding factor will be voter turnout, passion for a particular candidate is another. So what are voters thinking?

CNN's Bobbie Battista is at the "TALKBACK LIVE" set asking them that very question -- Bobbie.

BOBBIE BATTISTA, HOST, "TALKBACK LIVE": Natalie, we are back down here with folks who are being seated for the show, for "TALKBACK" coming up at 3:00 p.m. Eastern time.

Let's go to our chatroom first. That's been open and running for a while, so let's look at some comments from there if we can -- there we go: "Projections can and do have an impact on voter turnout and the way people vote," that from Don Chambers.

Dean Brunt says, "I voted for Nader and someone in Oregon who wants Nader, voted for Gore for me. A little Nader-trader going on there.

Let's take a phone call from Amy (ph), a voter in Hawaii -- Amy.

AMY: Hello?

BATTISTA: Hi.

AMY: Hi.

BATTISTA: Did you vote today already?

AMY: We're getting ready to go. I was waiting for this call so I could call back and ask my question.

BATTISTA: Oh, you have a question? Go ahead.

AMY: I heard on your station how Californians were concerned about results being in before their polls are closed and they were assured that the results would not be in until they were done voting. But people over here in Hawaii have concerns that the president is already elected while we're still at the polls, and does that mean our votes don't count?

BATTISTA: Absolutely not; your vote always counts and the fact that exit polling is done -- and after the states have completed their voting and sometimes the networks make projections on the winners there does not mean that you should not go to the polls. It does not mean that your vote doesn't count because in a race this close it could count, Amy, so just remember to keep that in mind.

Let me go to a couple of e-mails, here, quickly. Bruce (ph) in Pennsylvania says, "I was a the polls at 9:00 a.m. in my little township. I stood on-line for over an hour and was voted number 638. This is Republican territory and the people are turning out in droves. Seems like Bush's message has taken hold.

Carl (ph) in Florida says, "I'm amazed this election is close. It's such a no-brainer. Gore has the education, preparation and the know-how to be president."

And to a couple of folks in the audience real quickly -- no, we don't have time. We'll come back to them in our next cut-in -- Lou, Natalie.

LOU WATERS, CNN ANCHOR: OK Bobbie.

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