ad info

 
CNN.comTranscripts
 
Editions | myCNN | Video | Audio | Headline News Brief | Feedback  

 

  Search
 
 

 

TOP STORIES

Bush signs order opening 'faith-based' charity office for business

Rescues continue 4 days after devastating India earthquake

DaimlerChrysler employees join rapidly swelling ranks of laid-off U.S. workers

Disney's GO.com is a goner

(MORE)

MARKETS
4:30pm ET, 4/16
144.70
8257.60
3.71
1394.72
10.90
879.91
 


WORLD

U.S.

POLITICS

LAW

TECHNOLOGY

ENTERTAINMENT

 
TRAVEL

ARTS & STYLE



(MORE HEADLINES)
 
CNN Websites
Networks image


CNN Today

How is General Colin Powell Viewed Globally?

Aired December 18, 2000 - 2:53 p.m. ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.

KYRA PHILLIPS, CNN ANCHOR: As the work of presidential transition begins in earnest, so too do the questions and speculations about president-elect Bush's Cabinet nominations. One focal point is secretary of state designee Colin Powell.

CNN's Christiane Amanpour takes a look at this past involvements in international relations and what the future may hold.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

CHRISTIANE AMANPOUR, CNN CORRESPONDENT (voice-over): General Colin Powell's nomination as the next secretary of state has been welcomed by U.S. allies from Indonesia to Israel, from Europe to Russia. But despite the acclaim, there are already some tensions.

Russia, for instance, opposes George W. Bush's commitment to developing a new missile defense system, a commitment that Powell echoed in his nomination speech. It would mean renegotiating or withdrawing from the 1972 ABM treaty, which has been the basis of decades of nuclear-arms control. Europe, too, opposes that plan, as well as a Bush administration goal to pull U.S. peacekeeping troops out of places like Bosnia and Kosovo. Europe already bears the lion's share of peacekeeping in the Balkans.

U.S. enemies, such as Iraq, have dismissed Powell's nomination, saying U.S. policy during Baghdad will be no different during a Republican administration. Powell is reviled by the Iraqi government for waging the Gulf War. And he insists the new administration will reenergize the eroding sanctions imposed on Iraq after that war.

Elsewhere in the Middle East, Powell has already spoken by phone with the prime minister of Israel and the foreign minister of Egypt, two parties critical to the peace process. Powell says the Bush administration will remain engaged and committed to Israeli security, as well as the aspirations of the Palestinians. A senior Palestinian official warns that unless the U.S. addresses Palestinian rights, U.S. military and political interests and influence in the region will be harmed.

Analysts predict that General Powell could be the most influential U.S. foreign policy-maker in a generation, given George W. Bush's inexperience in that area so far. And European observers warn to expect less U.S. intervention abroad based on Powell's past record. As America's highest ranking military officer, he became known for the Powell doctrine: Only get involved as a measure of last resort, and then with overwhelming force. He initially advised against U.S. military action when Iraq invaded Kuwait.

He was against U.S. intervention to end the genocide in Bosnia, and criticized NATO's war in Kosovo. And yet, according to President Clinton, General Powell advised the U.S. to hunt down the Somali warlord, Mohamed Farah Aidid. Eighteen U.S. soldiers were killed in that disastrous effort. And afterwards, General Powell firmly opposed nation-building. Observers believe that a new Bush administration would limit U.S. involvement abroad to narrow national security interests.

However, most observers believe that, once in office, the Bush administration's foreign policy will look much the same as the Clinton administration's, with the same U.S. commitment to alliances and objectives. General Powell has already toned down some of the campaign rhetoric and sought to calm ruffled feathers here. He is also promising to fight on Capitol Hill for the funds and resources required by the State Department to wage an effective foreign policy.

Christiane Amanpour, CNN, London.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

TO ORDER A VIDEO OF THIS TRANSCRIPT, PLEASE CALL 800-CNN-NEWS OR USE OUR SECURE ONLINE ORDER FORM LOCATED AT www.fdch.com

 Search   


Back to the top  © 2001 Cable News Network. All Rights Reserved.
Terms under which this service is provided to you.
Read our privacy guidelines.