ad info

 
CNN.comTranscripts
 
Editions | myCNN | Video | Audio | Headline News Brief | Feedback  

 

  Search
 
 

 

TOP STORIES

Bush signs order opening 'faith-based' charity office for business

Rescues continue 4 days after devastating India earthquake

DaimlerChrysler employees join rapidly swelling ranks of laid-off U.S. workers

Disney's GO.com is a goner

(MORE)

MARKETS
4:30pm ET, 4/16
144.70
8257.60
3.71
1394.72
10.90
879.91
 


WORLD

U.S.

POLITICS

LAW

TECHNOLOGY

ENTERTAINMENT

 
TRAVEL

ARTS & STYLE



(MORE HEADLINES)
 
CNN Websites
Networks image


CNN Today

Dennis Moore of 'USA Today' Previews Inaugural Events

Aired January 18, 2001 - 1:55 p.m. ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.

NATALIE ALLEN, CNN ANCHOR: Well, if you have been watched CNN TODAY all week -- and we trust that you have -- you know we've been previewing the transfer of power with our colleagues at "USA Today."

Well, today, Dennis Moore joins us to talk about the fun stuff, the grand, old parties that will usher in the second Bush administration.

Dennis, is it -- is it your job to go to all of the parties this weekend? And that's -- that's a tough one.

DENNIS MOORE, "USA TODAY": I don't have enough energy to go to all the parties.

ALLEN: I hope not. Well, tell us...

MOORE: But I will try to give you a quick overview of them (ph).

ALLEN: Yes, do that. How big of an event is this going to be? And compare it to what we saw from Clinton many years ago.

MOORE: It will be slightly smaller than what the Clintons put on four years ago and eight years ago. But it's still going to be a very big party.

The Republicans may have won the election, but they also feel like they have to convince the nation that they can party just as hard as the Democrats.

On the final night, which is inaugural night on Saturday, there will be eight balls officially designated as inaugural balls. And approximately 50,000 people are expected to attend those.

Four years ago, there were 14 balls and 70,000 people. But there's going to be pretty much a gridlock in town, so I don't think that you will be able to tell the difference between the two years.

ALLEN: Who are the type of people that get -- and 50,000 people, that's a lot of folks to invite to parties. They haven't had that much time to plan. Are these mainly supporters?

MOORE: Yes, they are primarily Republicans. The Democrats have tucked their tails between their legs and headed out of town mostly. They are leaving it all to the grand old party this weekend. It is an enormous number of people. About half of the size of George W. Bush's hometown in Midland will be coming here to dance. But it's not just the inaugural party. There is the opening ceremonies which begin at 3:30 this afternoon, in which about 100,000 people are expected on the National Mall to hear a variety of singers, dancers, culminating with the performance of Ricky Martin, who is going to sing "The Cup of Life."

ALLEN: And there are some other entertainers that were listed in this order, which -- I love this: Rick Schroeder (ph), Meatloaf, Marie Osmand. If that's not a -- if that's not a group, I don't know what is.

So they will draw in some big Hollywood names as well.

I want to ask you one final question. With all due respect to our dear friends in Texas, are we going to see a lot of that -- the boots and the hats and the whole Texas-type, -themed parties?

MOORE: There's one night devoted primarily to that. It's the black-tie and boots ball for the Texas State Society. About the 10,000 people will be in their finery and in their cowboy boots, dancing around a giant, long horn steer.

ALLEN: Like no others can.

Dennis Moore, thank you so much for joining us. We will look for your coverage there in the paper and here as well. Thanks (ph).

MOORE: Thank you.

TO ORDER A VIDEO OF THIS TRANSCRIPT, PLEASE CALL 800-CNN-NEWS OR USE OUR SECURE ONLINE ORDER FORM LOCATED AT www.fdch.com

 Search   


Back to the top