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Special Event

Victim's Family Member Paul Hudson Reacts to Pan Am 103 Bombing Verdict

Aired January 31, 2001 - 9:42 a.m. ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.

DARYN KAGAN, CNN ANCHOR: We're going to take you live now to Washington, D.C. We're going to listen in to Paul Hudson. He is a family member. One of his relatives was killed onboard Flight 103 12 years ago over Lockerbie, Scotland. Let's listen in.

(JOINED IN PROGRESS)

PAUL HUDSON, FAMILY MEMBER OF VICTIM: It's not only not acceptable, but anyone who does that must pay a very high price.

QUESTION: Can you put a price on it?

HUDSON: No, but there are differences, several orders of magnitude between what some family members feel is appropriate and what has been suggested by some of these other parties.

QUESTION: (OFF-MIKE) actually securing damages from Libya, an actual payment. I understand there is some $100 million that's been frozen -- Libyan assets -- in the United States. Can that in any way be sufficient to compensate the families?

HUDSON: The amount of frozen assets has been estimated to be up to $2 billion. And the position of the U.S. government up to now has been that they cannot be used without permission of the president of the United States for any compensation. In some other cases involving the Lebanese hostages, Terry Anderson and some others, there was some congressional enactment last fall which provided a means by which families could be compensated. But, clearly, getting a judgment is one thing, getting it paid is another thing.

QUESTION: (OFF-MIKE) the guilty verdict today, would you not believe that that might give the Bush administration enough impetus to perhaps release those frozen assets?

HUDSON: It would certainly be something they need to look at. The U.N. Security Council sanctions, one of the terms which Libya has said that they have accepted, is that if there are convictions, which there have been today, they are to pay, in the words of the resolutions, "appropriate compensation." That has never been defined. And that will have to be defined.

QUESTION: Can you tell me about the questioning, how it began, how it's proceeding? Are the questions coming from all the different sites where the families are watching?

HUDSON: Yes, they first took Washington here, and then they moved to New York. And then I believe they're moving to London and Lockerbie.

QUESTION: How much time are they giving each city to ask questions? How much time?

HUDSON: They gave us sufficient time. There were about half a dozen questions from Washington. In New York, there was about 80 family members. They had one spokesperson with a list of like 17 questions.

KAGAN: We were listening to Paul Hudson. A relative of his died aboard Pan Am Flight 103 12 years ago above Lockerbie, Scotland.

If you've been watching our coverage, you know a Scottish court in Camp Zeist, the Netherlands today came up with a verdict of one Libyan man guilty, one not guilty, and his reaction to those verdicts today that we were listening to.

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