ad info

 
CNN.comTranscripts
 
Editions | myCNN | Video | Audio | Headline News Brief | Feedback  

 

  Search
 
 

 

TOP STORIES

Bush signs order opening 'faith-based' charity office for business

Rescues continue 4 days after devastating India earthquake

DaimlerChrysler employees join rapidly swelling ranks of laid-off U.S. workers

Disney's GO.com is a goner

(MORE)

MARKETS
4:30pm ET, 4/16
144.70
8257.60
3.71
1394.72
10.90
879.91
 


WORLD

U.S.

POLITICS

LAW

TECHNOLOGY

ENTERTAINMENT

 
TRAVEL

ARTS & STYLE



(MORE HEADLINES)
 
CNN Websites
Networks image


CNN Today

Napster Agrees to Screen for Copyrighted Material

Aired March 2, 2001 - 2:44 p.m. ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.

NATALIE ALLEN, CNN ANCHOR: There's news out of San Francisco about the Napster debate that continues in court. A federal judge has had something to say about the future of Napster, and James Hattori is covering that story for us.

James, what's up?

JAMES HATTORI, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Well, Natalie, everybody's wondering if today's activities before Judge Marilyn Hall Patel will spell the end of Napster. And it's become clear that at least it will be the end of Napster as a lot of users know it.

In court today, an attorney for Napster, David Boies, revealed that as of this weekend the service will begin implementing a screening process in its system which will prevent some copyrighted songs from being downloaded by users -- perhaps seeing the legal writing on the wall, or on the hard drive in this case, and is going ahead on its own to put this kind of screen in place.

The recording industry has supplied a list of at least 6,500 songs that it believes have been traded illegally on the site. Whether all those will be affected or just a portion of those, and to what extent they'll be affected is not yet clear.

The hearing goes on. A lot of the debate right now is as to how do you identify an improper file: By its name? By the title? By the artist?

And -- but they're clear in the direction they're going, and that is that in the words of Judge Patel it's not if there will be an injunction, it's when there will be an injunction.

Natalie, back to you.

ALLEN: So folks will see some changes coming up in just a few days. And that is David Boies.

HATTORI: This weekend.

ALLEN: That's the David Boies that we all remember from Florida, correct? He continues...

HATTORI: Indeed he is. Speaking for Napster.

ALLEN: ... yeah -- to be a hot attorney.

Thanks so much, James Hattori. We'll keep in contact with you.

TO ORDER A VIDEO OF THIS TRANSCRIPT, PLEASE CALL 800-CNN-NEWS OR USE OUR SECURE ONLINE ORDER FORM LOCATED AT www.fdch.com

 Search   


Back to the top