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Former Football Player Terry Bradshaw Thinks of Running for Louisiana Governor

Aired September 6, 2001 - 16:30   ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.
JOIE CHEN, CNN ANCHOR: NFL Hall of Famer Terry Bradshaw says he's thinking about a run, not another run on the field, to run for the governor of his home state, that is Louisiana. The former quarterback dazzled the football world in the '70s and '80s, leading the Pittsburgh Steelers to four Super Bowl titles. He's on the sidelines today as a sportscaster for Fox.

The other day, though, he suggested that he could "bring some fun" back into the governor's mansion. So we want to see what that means, and we want to see if Terry Bradshaw is going to be Jesse Ventura?

Let's talk about it with Wayne Parent, he is a political science professor at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge. Thanks for being with us, professor. You know, I just can't think of Terry Bradshaw as anything but a Steeler. I think of him as a Pittsburgher. It's hard for me to think of him having residence still in Louisiana.

WAYNE PARENT, LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY: Well, folks in Louisiana think of him as Louisianian. They remember his days at Louisiana Tech, and yeah, he's got a lot of good will down here.

CHEN: And has he had much identity down there recently? I understand he's been in some public service campaigns and stuff like that on TV.

PARENT: Yeah, you see him in public service campaigns, you see him in commercials. You see him quite a bit, he's a popular sort of folk hero around here.

CHEN: Sure, and in a lot of places as well. Talk about the field, though, he would be getting into. There are a lot of folks in Louisiana politics who have been angling for the governor's seat for a while.

PARENT: That's right. I mean, it could be quite a field. He is going to have to stand in line. The person everyone is waiting for is U.S. Senator John Breaux who has been hinting that he might want to run, and if he runs that's sort of the big kahuna in the field. If he doesn't run, there's, you know, lieutenant governor, attorney general -- you can list several.

However, that could work to Bradshaw's advantage. We have this wide open election system, no Republican or Democratic primaries, the top two people getting a runoff, and you know, if there are 10 legitimate candidates, he hops into a runoff with someone sort of unpopular, you never can tell.

CHEN: Yeah, I think Bradshaw said he was a Republican, but he would be willing to go neutral if that helps out.

PARENT: Well, it's funny. Our last governor decided the day of qualifying, our present governor decided the day of qualifying whether he was a Democrat or a Republican and became a Republican.

CHEN: I think a lot of us would like that opportunity.

OK, we've got questions from the Web chat audience. This is Joel Hack asking: "What experience does Terry Bradshaw have?" Well, we certainly know about his experience on the field and at the anchor desk there, but what are other experiences that Terry Bradshaw would be bringing to the game?

PARENT: Well, I think if people were looking for someone without political experience, they would be looking for someone like him, and sometimes people are. He doesn't have any political experience per se, though.

CHEN: OK. Another question from the Web chat audience. Dusty O'Connell asking: "Are any public interest groups displaying support for Mr. Bradshaw?"

PARENT: Not yet. I mean, this is sort of new to all of us, too, and he is going to have to take some sides on some issues if he starts to run.

CHEN: Do you think that it is a serious offer out there?

PARENT: Well, I do think -- I mean, I do think if there are some interest groups, or if one of the parties, if the Republicans feel like they don't have a strong enough candidate, they might get to Bradshaw, but I think there's some Republicans out there who would disagree with that.

CHEN: Well, we will see what happened. William Parent, political science professor at Louisiana State University, LSU, thanks very much for being with us this afternoon.

PARENT: Good to be here.

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