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CNN LIVE EVENT/SPECIAL

New Security Measures Not Enough to Assure Passengers

Aired September 27, 2001 - 16:35   ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.
CHEN: What is reaction at airports to Mr. Bush's new security proposals? To get a sense of that we go to the airport in San Francisco. CNN's Rusty Dornin is standing by there -- Rusty.

RUSTY DORNIN, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Joie, counters here at San Francisco airport are empty. We have been here about three hours. For most of that time you could roll a bowling ball down these counters and you wouldn't hit a soul. Now, apparently they have cut back the flights by 20 percent but most of those flights are going out half empty.

The airport officials say about 50 percent of passengers are flying with 50 percent fewer passengers than they were before the attacks. Now, while it was unanimous to the folks I talked to here about their applause of President Bush's efforts to bolster security, people were not so unanimous about whether it would encourage them to get on airplanes again and resume their old flying patterns. But of course there are always those that have no fear of flying.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I didn't have any problem flying today. The security -- I came from Minnesota and the security was slower, longer lines but I think everybody is thankful for that. I wasn't afraid to fly, but I feel that the pilots should have more control over what is going on.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

DORNIN: Now, a couple of things that people I spoke to here found unsettling: One was that the National Guard, the armed soldiers may be patrolling airports. Some people feel that is sort of reminiscent of a police state. They didn't really want to see that happening. And of course, the other unsettling news was that two Air Force generals have been authorized to shoot down any commercial aircraft that is hijacked and endangering U.S. cities and many people find that sobering.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I think everybody is going to be nervous about that but we can't let this stop our economy and stop business and stop our lives.

DORNIN: So, it wouldn't stop you from getting on a flight?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I just quit my job because I got tired of all the traveling and the nightmare and changed so I wouldn't have to travel. The only reason I am traveling now is because I would like to get home to my father's funeral.

DORNIN: But will increased security measures encourage you to you fly more?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Not necessarily.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

DORNIN: That of course is not good news to airlines or airport officials. San Francisco is reporting that they may lose $85 million this year because of reduced revenues. Now again that is the domino effect because $8 million of that usually guess to the city of San Francisco in tax revenues and of course hotel taxes and things in this area for the smaller communities will also be down.

So you can really see the ripple effect that the fact that people may not get back on flights can cause -- Joie.

CHEN: Out at the airport in San Francisco, the domestic terminal there, CNN's Rusty Dornin.

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