Skip to main content
CNN.com /TRANSCRIPTS
CNN TV
EDITIONS
SERVICES
CNN TV
EDITIONS


CNN LIVE EVENT/SPECIAL

Rumsfeld and Pakistani Foreign Minister Hold Press Conference

Aired June 13, 2002 - 06:03   ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.
CAROL COSTELLO, CNN ANCHOR: Breaking news to tell you about right now. Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld is in Pakistan meeting with officials about the situation in Kashmir. Now, today's talks follow Rumsfeld's meetings in New Delhi. As you know, tensions between the two nuclear neighbors, India and Pakistan, have cooled of somewhat, but a million troops are still deployed around the line of control dividing the disputed region of Kashmir.

Let's listen in to this press conference in Pakistan.

(IN PROGRESS)

ABDUL SATTAR, PAKISTANI FOREIGN MINISTER: ... starting from the United States across the European Union, Russia, China and Japan, are all on the side of peace and are investing efforts for de-escalation of tensions and promotion of dialogue to bring peace into our region. President George W. Bush has especially invested a lot of his time and attention to this end. Secretary of State Colin Powell and Secretary Rumsfeld have been indefatigable in their diplomacy for peace in our region.

President Musharraf and his government have extended full cooperation in these efforts for peace. De-escalation is obviously the immediate priority. Even more encouraging for us is the United States policy to remain engaged in this region for a lasting solution of the Kashmir problem. Efforts need to be sustained so that the root cause of recurrent tensions between Pakistan and India is addressed in a meaningful manner. A settlement of the Kashmir question in conformity with the principles of justice and international law will ensure the establishment of durable peace and normalization of relations between Pakistan and India.

With these words, I am going to request Secretary Rumsfeld to address you. And afterwards, depending on the limited time that this secretary has, we will take short questions -- Mr. secretary.

DONALD RUMSFELD, SECRETARY OF STATE: Thank you very much, Mr. minister, and good afternoon.

We have had good meetings here today, and with the president, as the minister indicated, and also with General Aziz Khan and his staff. And needless to say, I thanked the president and the minister for the suburb cooperation that the United States has received and the coalition countries have received with respect to Operation Enduring Freedom and the global war on terrorism.

I also expressed appreciation for the president's leadership in helping to work through the current crisis, and as the minister indicated, the goal of certainly President Bush and Secretary Colin Powell, Prime Minister Blair and so many other leaders around the world, is to see that the tensions are reduced, and I think that progress is indeed being made.

The only other thing I would say is to agree with the minister's characterization of our discussions and emphasize that the relationship between the United States and Pakistan is quite apart from the coalition and our bilateral relationships with respect to the war on terrorism is an important bilateral relationship for the United States. We value the growing constructive, political and economic and military-to-military relationships that we have developed, and look forward to seeing them strengthened each week and each month and each year as we go forward.

So it has been a good visit, and we would be happy to respond to some questions.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Mr. Defense Secretary, this is in reference to your statement in India about the indications of al Qaeda operating along the line of control. A similar statement you had made back home in the U.S. as well a couple of weeks ago. We want to know what's the factual basis of your statement, No. 1. And related to that, did it play itself out in your meeting with General Pervez Musharraf today?

RUMSFELD: I think what I said in the United States and on this trip in earlier stops is what I know to be the facts, and the facts are that I do not have evidence and the United States does not have evidence of al Qaeda in Kashmir. We do have a good deal of scraps of intelligence that come in from people saying that they believe al Qaeda are in Kashmir or in various locations. It tends to be speculative. It is not actionable. It is not verifiable.

So if you -- and I believe I made that clearly -- that distinction clear when I responded to a question in Delhi I think. In any event, that is -- insofar as I know, that is the situation, and I did express that during one or more of my discussions here in Pakistan.

COSTELLO: And I don't think he is going to say anymore on that topic, but that was the topic of the morning asked by an Indian journalist whether al Qaeda terrorists were in the disputed region in Kashmir. India accuses Pakistan of allowing terrorists to go in there, and India claims that those terrorists are responsible for much of the violence that is happening on the Indian-controlled side of Kashmir.

This is the last stop for Donald Rumsfeld on his Asia tour. He is now come home to the United States, and he said the meeting was fine with President Pervez Musharraf, and he thanked Pakistan for helping -- for their continuing help in Enduring Freedom.

TO ORDER A VIDEO OF THIS TRANSCRIPT, PLEASE CALL 800-CNN-NEWS OR USE OUR SECURE ONLINE ORDER FORM LOCATED AT www.fdch.com.



Conference>


 
 
 
 


 Search   

Back to the top