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CNN LIVE EVENT/SPECIAL

US Courts UN Consent for Iraq Attack

Aired September 30, 2002 - 12:32   ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.

WOLF BLITZER, CNN ANCHOR: Let's go up to the United Nations, where Richard Roth is standing by.
What is happening as far as the new United Nations Security Council resolution is concerned -- Richard.

RICHARD ROTH, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Nothing yet so far. Wolf, in Washington, you have over 500 votes to consider on a resolution in Congress; here, a smaller number, but perhaps more significance: 15 votes on the UN Security Council. But it really is the big five that the U.S. has to shop for on this new resolution, four other countries with veto rights, including France and Russia, who will probably be the most difficult.

The U.S right now shopping the resolution around. Later in the day, the U.S. and the specifically the United Kingdom will show the 10 nonpermanent members of the Security Council the details of this tough resolution, which has several deadlines for Iraq to comply with.

UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan, though, was optimistic that things could be settled here.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

KOFI ANNAN, U.N. SECRETARY-GENERAL: I expect them to get together. I expect them to work this out and come up with an acceptable resolution.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

ROTH: It could be several days, perhaps weeks, before the Security Council does decide on a resolution. The United States has a lot of negotiating to go work out. China said we want to see a political settlement within the context of the UN.

Nobody here likes to hear President Bush talk about a lack of UN backbone or Washington going it alone perhaps on the military route -- Wolf.

BLITZER: The key question, Richard, will this new UN Security Council resolution change the terms of reference as far as surprise inspections are concerned, the deal that was worked out in '98 between Kofi Annan and the Iraqi government. What is the play on that?

ROTH: The U.S. first draft says the inspectors can go anywhere they want to. The Iraqis, especially over the weekend, said he won't accept a new resolution with different terms. Hans Blix will take his marching orders, though, from the Security Council; Colin Powell, the secretary of state, says the inspectors should not return, as they are set to do October 15, without some new mandate from the Security Council.

BLITZER: Richard Roth at the United Nations. We will be checking back with you often. Thank you very much.

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