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CNN BREAKING NEWS

Apparent Tornado Hits Meridianville, Alabama

Aired May 6, 2003 - 10:23   ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.

DARYN KAGAN, CNN ANCHOR: It looks like this weather story is not over. Chad has news of yet another tornado.
Chad -- what do you have?

CHAD MYERS, CNN METEOROLOGIST: We just talked about this, Daryn -- thank, you Jacqi -- just talked about this tornado that was moving just north of the town of Huntsville, the city of Huntsville, Alabama. In fact, it did hit the city of Meridianville, Alabama, significant damage to Meridianville. We knew this storm moved across Highway 231 about 10 miles north of Huntsville, Alabama, and now a tornado warning for St. Clair County in Missouri.

The public reported a tornado near Walker in Missouri, about 13 miles northwest of Nevada, Missouri, moving east at 35 miles per hour.

And so, yes, it continues to go today, Daryn, and now obviously the tornado damage reported -- significant damage reported by the wire. We'll be having crews on the way, and we'll keep you up-to-date as it continues.

This day is not going to end any time soon. More damage expected later on this after afternoon.

KAGAN: Well, and on that note, Chad, let me ask you, with that first round of storms having passed through and now we're looking at the next round, how are the tornado warning systems working in these areas?

MYERS: Things are going OK. But you know, obviously if we have some type of tornado warning in the same places like into Franklin County or into parts obviously where Leon Harris is, there is very little power in those areas. And so, those sirens won't be going off. That's why you need that radio.

Daryn, let me walk over here and get it. This is newest thing. You absolutely need this. If you have a smoke detector in your house and you should, you need a box like this. It's the new weather radio, not like the old ones. You program the county that you want it to go off, obviously the county that you live in. It's battery-operated. It doesn't need to be plugged in. Obviously there is no cord on this at all. It works 24 hours a day. The Weather Service puts it out, and this goes off, and you know -- you can hear it. It will wake you up and it will keep you up-to-date on what's going on here.

So, obviously some tornadoes going on still here in northern Alabama. KAGAN: All right, Chad, we'll be checking back with you throughout the morning. Thank you so much.

MYERS: You bet.

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