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CONNECT THE WORLD

Interview with Jessica Alba

Aired April 26, 2010 - 00:00:00   ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


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BECKY ANDERSON, CNN CORRESPONDENT (voice-over): She's one of Hollywood's sweethearts.

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UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I want you to tell me.

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ANDERSON: With more than two dozen films and a Golden Globe nomination to her name, Jessica Alba has proved her acting chart (ph). Her role as Invisible Women in the "Fantastic Four" series has made her a global household name. Now, the 28-year-old beauty is trying to give back. Alba is working to unveil landmark legislation in the U.S. Congress to help achieve basic education for children around the world.

JESSICA ALBA, ACTRESS: Say one girl.

UNIDENTIFIED CHILDREN: One girl!

ANDERSON: Her movement is part of the One Girl's World Cup campaign.

From Sin City to global saint, Jessica Alba is your Connector of the Day.

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ANDERSON: And as part of that campaign, Jessica has proved she's more than just a pretty face.

I caught up with her on Capitol Hill in Washington after she had taken that initiative to Congress. And I asked her how she became involved. And this is what she said.

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ALBA: What's ingenious about this campaign is the World Cup is taking place in South Africa and the world, you know, there's going to -- really going to be a spotlight on Africa this year more than ever. And if there's to be a lasting legacy that's going to affect Africa, but also every developing nation, it should be education for all.

ANDERSON: Jurgen from Suriname has written. He says: "What is your opinion on the current state of basic education for kids worldwide?"

ALBA: Well, 72 million children around the world don't have access to an education. Sixty percent of them are in Africa and most of them are girls. If a child is educated, they're 50 percent less likely to contract HIV or AIDS. There's, you know, really no other way for them to beat poverty and create any sort of life for themselves if they can't read and write or do basic math. So...

ANDERSON: Schuyler has written in. And he says -- or she says: "Why have you chosen education over other issues plaguing the Third World?"

ALBA: What's amazing about education is it actually tackles every other issue that plagues the Third World or developing countries, actually. Through an education -- through having a basic education, like I said, you're less likely to get HIV or AIDS and you can really, truly fight poverty because you'll be able to run a business. And without knowing how to read or write and without knowing how to do basic math, there's no way you could do that.

ANDERSON: Dean Mountford asks how can he get involved in the campaign?

ALBA: What's genius about this campaign is we're not -- we're not asking for money. We just want everyone to sign up, to join1goal.org so that we can put pressure on our world leaders to make education for all the lasting legacy of the World Cup. So all you have to do is sign this petition.

ANDERSON: And you've seen -- our viewers will have seen Queen Rania doing exactly the same thing with me. It would say (ph) it's a -- it's a good message. And we talked some months ago about exactly this.

Another question from Bre. He says now that you've been to Washington a few times, has the idea of a political career after you're done acting crossed your mind?"

(LAUGHTER)

ALBA: Having more babies.

(LAUGHTER)

ANDERSON: Yes.

ALBA: I love being a mom, I have to say.

ANDERSON: It's good stuff.

And -- and...

ALBA: If I ever stop acting, that -- that will be my number one thing.

ANDERSON: Good for you.

Kathir from India: "How have you been able to come so far? What inspired you?" And I suppose he's referring to your film career and your philanthropic work.

ALBA: Wow! A lot of things have inspired me. Certainly my family and my family's struggle, actually, to get an education and my grandfather's struggle to get a higher education to provide a better life for my family and for me. And him -- you know, he was really a -- a trailblazer in our family. And -- and showed me that my goals can come true. And -- and my dreams can come true and my goals can be achieved. So it was really my family.

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ANDERSON: Jessica Alba, aspiring to more than just Hollywood.

And tomorrow's Connector comes from a long line of top Pakistani politicians. Fatima Bhutto is better known for her books. The poet, journalist and social activist, she has just published a memoir entitled, "Songs of Blood and Swords."

So get your questions in. And remember to tell us where you're watching from. It's your part of the show, your Connector, Connector of the Day, CNN.com/connect is where you can send us your questions.

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