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STUDENT NEWS

Inaugural Prayer Service; World Economic Forum in Davos Begins

Aired January 23, 2013 - 04:00:00   ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: Morals, fairness, vengeance, we see people display these things all the time, but there is scientists who think it`s all a bunch of monkey business. You`re going to find out why. I`m Carl Azuz. Welcome to CNN STUDENT NEWS.

We`ve been talking about some of the traditional events involved in the presidential inauguration. Another one happened on Tuesday morning, the inaugural prayer service. The president, First Lady Michelle Obama and about 2200 other people went to the interfaith service at the National Cathedral. Now, by interfaith, we mean, it involved different religions. Yesterday`s service included prayers and readings for members of the Protestant, Catholic, Orthodox Christian as well as Jewish, Islamic and Sikh faiths. The tradition of the inaugural prayer service started with George Washington. It`s been held at the National Cathedral since 1985.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

BARACK OBAMA, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA: We will respond to the threat of climate change. Knowing that the failure to do so would betray our children and future generations.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

AZUZ: That was part of President Obama`s inaugural speech on Monday. He mentioned some of the issues that are going to be part of his second term agenda. What he hopes to get done during the next four years.

Some of the issues are holdovers from his first term, trying to lower the country`s debt. Working on immigration reform. Other issues are new for him like gun control. On our blog, some of you shared your expectations for President Obama`s second term.

Antonio said "I hope to see a more stable economy and a more united nation rather than a nation that`s divided on political and social issues."

Maddie wants to see that we lower our debt and stop depending on countries like China for the things we need.

John lists immigration reform, gun control and the debt ceiling.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: See if you can ID me. I`m a European country that`s between France, Germany and Italy. I didn`t get involved in either world war. I`m known for tourism, banking and watches. And my capital is Bern.

I`m Switzerland. A country that`s home to around 8 million people.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

AZUZ: Davos is the resort city in the Swiss mountains. That`s not why we are talking about it. It`s because this week, like every year, Davos is hosting the World Economic Forum. This is a group that brings together business leaders, political leaders and other influential folks. They are going to be talking about global economic issues like the debt crisis and high unemployment rates across parts of Europe. Or the fiscal cliff and debt ceiling debates in Washington. The group also brainstorms possible solutions, like creating a bailout fund or coming up with ways for governments to reduce their debt. Richard Quest now has an analogy comparing some of the economic issues that will be discussed at Davos to a popular pastime.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

RICHARD QUEST, CNN CORRESPONDENT: On the mountain, risk is everywhere. And the lessons ...

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Whoever skies, parallel ....

QUEST: Newitt (ph) has been a ski instructor for years. He knows that on the mountain and in the global economy, it`s all about balance.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: You have to move with the bump, and take it.

QUEST: So far, we`ve navigated the bump of the fiscal cliff. Now, we must negotiate the debt ceiling, high unemployment, social unrest. Again, we learn from the mountain - baby steps to build confidence.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: But if we ski slowly, we feel what we are doing and then we get confident and we get faster and faster.

QUEST: But economic growth seemingly won`t go faster.

There`s always the risk in the global economy that something goes wrong.

Snowboarders, they have their own way of shredding down the mountain. It`s brutal economics.

(on camera): What`s the secret to snowboarding?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Don`t be scared.

QUEST: You pick speed too quickly, and you end up falling over.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: No, come on, like, that`s why you need to move.

QUEST: Why do you like snowboarding?

(LAUGHTER)

QUEST: You go too fast, too quickly and fall over?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Not necessarily.

QUEST (voice over): Perhaps, the best lesson to be learned in managing risk comes from the cross-country skier. Those hardy experts of slow, steady progress taking huge amounts of energy.

As the map of the mountain shows, everything is interconnected. And that will be on the minds of the participants in Davos as they analyze today`s global risks.

Richard Quest, CNN, Davos.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

AZUZ: All right. Thanks, Richard. Jackie Chisolm (ph) is a teacher in Florida. She said, after last month shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School an idea came to her - she thought we buy back guns, why not buy back video games and DVDs? That`s what she started doing. We are talking specifically about violent games and DVDs. She offered students a chance to trade in their violent video games. For each one they turn in, students get money back. The teacher is paying for it out of her own money, and she believes that violence in games and movies can affect the actions of the people playing or watching them. That`s why she started this buyback idea. As some folks will agree with this, some folks won`t, so we are asking about it on our blog today at cnnstudentnews.com. Do you think that playing violent video games or watching violent movies contributes to violent behavior? Talk to us on our blog.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Today`s "Shoutout" goes out to Mr. Biggs` STAR class at Hoech Middle School in St. Louis, Missouri. Baboons and chimpanzees are both part of which of these groups? Here we go, are they both: apes, monkeys, primates or troglodytes? You`ve got three seconds, go!

Baboons are monkeys, chimps are apes, and both are primates. That`s your answer and that`s your "Shoutout."

(END VIDEO CLIP)

AZUZ: The oldest and largest primate center in the U.S. is in Atlanta, Georgia. Some researchers there studying things like morality, also, reciprocity, the idea that if I give you something, you`ll give me something back that`s about the same. These could be considered some high level concepts, but these scientists think the monkeys and apes they work with, get it.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

FRANS DE WAAL: A morality is usually considered a uniquely humane domain, and maybe it is in some ways, but I think morality also has elements of empathy and compassion, on the one hand, reciprocity and fairness. And all of these elements we can see in other primates.

We do, for example, studies on fairness. Are they sensitive to getting less than somebody else, or more than somebody else? We do studies on yawn contagion, how they are affected by the yawns of others, like humans are? You know.

Well, yawn contagion is interesting because we know in humans it correlates with empathy. If you are very sensitive to the yawns of others, you are usually also a very empathic person. And we study it by giving chimpanzees a little video that they can watch, and on the video they see a yawning chimpanzee. And then we see what they do, of course. And what we find is that if the chimpanzee that they see on the video is one that they know, they are going to be yawning more. If it`s someone that they don`t know, so a stranger, they are unaffected by it.

Reciprocity, we`ve done studies of where we give, for example, one chimpanzee a lot of food, and then see how that chimpanzee shares with others, and then we do another occasion and see if the ones who have received from this chimp are willing to return the favor. And chimpanzees do, chimpanzees do keep favors in mind, but also negative actions, like humans, they also take revenge. Well, for example if chimpanzee has lost a fight to several others, he may wait for an occasion to get even with these individuals individually.

So, reciprocity is a basic element, fairness in dividing resources also basic element of human society. And if you can recognize these elements in animals like chimpanzees who are also closely related to us, that means that that characteristic is probably quite old.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

AZUZ: Well, as far as we know, David Parsons isn`t angry with anyone. But he is asking everyone to hug it out. Everyone he can find in a 24-hour period. Parsons is aiming for a world record: the most hugs by one person in one day. His amiable affection isn`t aimless. He`s hoping his hugs raise money for an organization that helps kids fighting cancer. He set up shot on Monday, and, of course, he didn`t turn away anyone who got in line. When you`re trying for this kind of record, you can`t afford to keep anyone in arm`s length. You just give yourself over to the experience, you know, really embrace it. I think we have squeezed every drop of pun we can out of this one. So we`re going to wrap things up and see you back again tomorrow for more CNN STUDENT NEWS. Bye-bye.

CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: Morals, fairness, vengeance, we see people display these things all the time, but there is scientists who think it`s all a bunch of monkey business. You`re going to find out why. I`m Carl Azuz. Welcome to CNN STUDENT NEWS.

We`ve been talking about some of the traditional events involved in the presidential inauguration. Another one happened on Tuesday morning, the inaugural prayer service. The president, First Lady Michelle Obama and about 2200 other people went to the interfaith service at the National Cathedral. Now, by interfaith, we mean, it involved different religions. Yesterday`s service included prayers and readings for members of the Protestant, Catholic, Orthodox Christian as well as Jewish, Islamic and Sikh faiths. The tradition of the inaugural prayer service started with George Washington. It`s been held at the National Cathedral since 1985.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

BARACK OBAMA, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA: We will respond to the threat of climate change. Knowing that the failure to do so would betray our children and future generations.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

AZUZ: That was part of President Obama`s inaugural speech on Monday. He mentioned some of the issues that are going to be part of his second term agenda. What he hopes to get done during the next four years.

Some of the issues are holdovers from his first term, trying to lower the country`s debt. Working on immigration reform. Other issues are new for him like gun control. On our blog, some of you shared your expectations for President Obama`s second term.

Antonio said "I hope to see a more stable economy and a more united nation rather than a nation that`s divided on political and social issues."

Maddie wants to see that we lower our debt and stop depending on countries like China for the things we need.

John lists immigration reform, gun control and the debt ceiling.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: See if you can ID me. I`m a European country that`s between France, Germany and Italy. I didn`t get involved in either world war. I`m known for tourism, banking and watches. And my capital is Bern.

I`m Switzerland. A country that`s home to around 8 million people.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

AZUZ: Davos is the resort city in the Swiss mountains. That`s not why we are talking about it. It`s because this week, like every year, Davos is hosting the World Economic Forum. This is a group that brings together business leaders, political leaders and other influential folks. They are going to be talking about global economic issues like the debt crisis and high unemployment rates across parts of Europe. Or the fiscal cliff and debt ceiling debates in Washington. The group also brainstorms possible solutions, like creating a bailout fund or coming up with ways for governments to reduce their debt. Richard Quest now has an analogy comparing some of the economic issues that will be discussed at Davos to a popular pastime.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

RICHARD QUEST, CNN CORRESPONDENT: On the mountain, risk is everywhere. And the lessons ...

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Whoever skies, parallel ....

QUEST: Newitt (ph) has been a ski instructor for years. He knows that on the mountain and in the global economy, it`s all about balance.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: You have to move with the bump, and take it.

QUEST: So far, we`ve navigated the bump of the fiscal cliff. Now, we must negotiate the debt ceiling, high unemployment, social unrest. Again, we learn from the mountain - baby steps to build confidence.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: But if we ski slowly, we feel what we are doing and then we get confident and we get faster and faster.

QUEST: But economic growth seemingly won`t go faster.

There`s always the risk in the global economy that something goes wrong.

Snowboarders, they have their own way of shredding down the mountain. It`s brutal economics.

(on camera): What`s the secret to snowboarding?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Don`t be scared.

QUEST: You pick speed too quickly, and you end up falling over.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: No, come on, like, that`s why you need to move.

QUEST: Why do you like snowboarding?

(LAUGHTER)

QUEST: You go too fast, too quickly and fall over?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Not necessarily.

QUEST (voice over): Perhaps, the best lesson to be learned in managing risk comes from the cross-country skier. Those hardy experts of slow, steady progress taking huge amounts of energy.

As the map of the mountain shows, everything is interconnected. And that will be on the minds of the participants in Davos as they analyze today`s global risks.

Richard Quest, CNN, Davos.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

AZUZ: All right. Thanks, Richard. Jackie Chisolm (ph) is a teacher in Florida. She said, after last month shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School an idea came to her - she thought we buy back guns, why not buy back video games and DVDs? That`s what she started doing. We are talking specifically about violent games and DVDs. She offered students a chance to trade in their violent video games. For each one they turn in, students get money back. The teacher is paying for it out of her own money, and she believes that violence in games and movies can affect the actions of the people playing or watching them. That`s why she started this buyback idea. As some folks will agree with this, some folks won`t, so we are asking about it on our blog today at cnnstudentnews.com. Do you think that playing violent video games or watching violent movies contributes to violent behavior? Talk to us on our blog.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Today`s "Shoutout" goes out to Mr. Biggs` STAR class at Hoech Middle School in St. Louis, Missouri. Baboons and chimpanzees are both part of which of these groups? Here we go, are they both: apes, monkeys, primates or troglodytes? You`ve got three seconds, go!

Baboons are monkeys, chimps are apes, and both are primates. That`s your answer and that`s your "Shoutout."

(END VIDEO CLIP)

AZUZ: The oldest and largest primate center in the U.S. is in Atlanta, Georgia. Some researchers there studying things like morality, also, reciprocity, the idea that if I give you something, you`ll give me something back that`s about the same. These could be considered some high level concepts, but these scientists think the monkeys and apes they work with, get it.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

FRANS DE WAAL: A morality is usually considered a uniquely humane domain, and maybe it is in some ways, but I think morality also has elements of empathy and compassion, on the one hand, reciprocity and fairness. And all of these elements we can see in other primates.

We do, for example, studies on fairness. Are they sensitive to getting less than somebody else, or more than somebody else? We do studies on yawn contagion, how they are affected by the yawns of others, like humans are? You know.

Well, yawn contagion is interesting because we know in humans it correlates with empathy. If you are very sensitive to the yawns of others, you are usually also a very empathic person. And we study it by giving chimpanzees a little video that they can watch, and on the video they see a yawning chimpanzee. And then we see what they do, of course. And what we find is that if the chimpanzee that they see on the video is one that they know, they are going to be yawning more. If it`s someone that they don`t know, so a stranger, they are unaffected by it.

Reciprocity, we`ve done studies of where we give, for example, one chimpanzee a lot of food, and then see how that chimpanzee shares with others, and then we do another occasion and see if the ones who have received from this chimp are willing to return the favor. And chimpanzees do, chimpanzees do keep favors in mind, but also negative actions, like humans, they also take revenge. Well, for example if chimpanzee has lost a fight to several others, he may wait for an occasion to get even with these individuals individually.

So, reciprocity is a basic element, fairness in dividing resources also basic element of human society. And if you can recognize these elements in animals like chimpanzees who are also closely related to us, that means that that characteristic is probably quite old.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

AZUZ: Well, as far as we know, David Parsons isn`t angry with anyone. But he is asking everyone to hug it out. Everyone he can find in a 24-hour period. Parsons is aiming for a world record: the most hugs by one person in one day. His amiable affection isn`t aimless. He`s hoping his hugs raise money for an organization that helps kids fighting cancer. He set up shot on Monday, and, of course, he didn`t turn away anyone who got in line. When you`re trying for this kind of record, you can`t afford to keep anyone in arm`s length. You just give yourself over to the experience, you know, really embrace it. I think we have squeezed every drop of pun we can out of this one. So we`re going to wrap things up and see you back again tomorrow for more CNN STUDENT NEWS. Bye-bye.

END