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CNN SUNDAY MORNING

American Sniper Murdered; White House Releases Picture of President Skeet Shooting; Sixth Day of Hostage Standoff; Super Bowl Spectacle; Will Boy Scouts Lift Ban on Gay Members?; Get Ready for Fall Fashion

Aired February 3, 2013 - 06:00   ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


RANDI KAYE, CNN ANCHOR: From CNN World Headquarters in Atlanta, this is EARLY START WEEKEND. Day six and the standoff continues. Though Jimmy Lee Dykes hasn't surrendered his five-year-old hostage, there may be new reason for optimism.

The Boy Scouts may vote as early as tomorrow to lift a ban on openly gay members. Now Governor Rick Perry has taken a stand. What he said might surprise you.

And, the moment is almost here. Nope, not the Super Bowl. New York's Fashion Week. We'll have a preview.

It is Sunday, February 3rd. Good morning, everyone. I'm Randi Kaye. Glad you're with us.

We begin this morning with news about the shooting death of a former Navy SEAL who became known as the deadliest sniper in U.S. history. CNN affiliates WFAA and KHOU are reporting Chris Kyle was killed yesterday, along with another person, at a gun range near Ft. Worth, Texas. Local newspapers also confirm the death. WFAA reports a former Marine suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder is being held this morning in connection with the shootings. These are pictures of Kyle taken from the security company, Kraft International, he founded after leaving the Navy in 2009. Kyle recounted his four combat tours in Iraq in his book "American Sniper." He said his more than 150 sniper kills prompted Iraqi insurgents to place a bounty on his head. He said they even nicknamed him "The Devil." Most recently, Kyle appeared on the NBC reality show "Stars Earn Stripes" and also on Conan O'Brien's show.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

CONAN O'BRIEN, HOST, "CONAN": You were so well-known by the Iraqi insurgents that you were fighting that they put a $20,000 bounty on your head, is that right?

CHRIS KYLE, FORMER NAVY SEAL: Yes, sir.

O'BRIEN: How did the Iraqi insurgents identify who you were?

KYLE: When I'd go into a house, and we had the occupied houses, I would take the top of my uniform off and just have my short sleeve shirt on and you could see my tattoo coming down my arm. And they identified that with me and started every time someone would be shot by a sniper in the area, they associated that with me.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

KAYE: And as we stay on top of this story, we want to bring in a friend of Chris Kyle's who name is Jason Kos and he joins me by phone this morning.

Jason, good morning.

JASON KOS, CHRIS KYLE'S FRIEND (via telephone): Good morning.

KAYE: First off, I'm so sorry. Our condolences for the loss of your friend.

Can you tell us a little bit about Chris Kyle and how well you knew him?

KOS: Yes, ma'am. I certainly didn't know him as well as many. However, the last year and a half we worked very closely together to form a 5013c foundation. The FITCO Cares hero's project. And this was Chris' vision to help provide returning veterans with exercise equipment and gym memberships, because he was an avid -- he worked out every morning, early in the morning, before he started his day and understood how important it was and knew that a lot of his fellow war heroes didn't have those opportunities. So this was his vision and myself and our company helped -- helped bring that to life.

KAYE: And when did you first learn of Chris' death and from whom?

KOS: About 9:00 p.m. last night I got several phone calls and text messages.

KAYE: And what is your understanding of what happened?

KOS: I believe, you know, he and a friend took a Marine that was suffering from PTSD to a gun range to shoot. And as a way that, you know, he always did, giving back. And, you know, it was certainly him taking his time to help, again, help our war heroes and, apparently, that Marine --

KAYE: He had -- he had quite a reputation in the field as one of the most lethal snipers out there. How did he handle that?

KOS: You know, he viewed it, Chris viewed it as his job and he was protecting his brothers, frankly. He, as a man, with quite contrary to that because he was an incredibly loving father and charismatic and a really caring person. So it's quite a contrast from, you know, what he -- what he did as his job and his (INAUDIBLE) tours of duty.

KAYE: We are not naming the suspect in this case, but do you know if there was any connection at all, or believed to be any connection between Chris Kyle and the suspect?

KOS: No, ma'am, I have no idea.

KAYE: Was this shooting range somewhere that he would frequent regularly? Where the shooting occurred. The gun range.

KOS: I believe -- I believe so, yes. I think he was familiar with the location.

KAYE: And can you tell me about his personal life at all?

KOS: Yes. That's what I know best, because I certainly didn't know him as a Navy SEAL. He was a man of incredible character. He led by example, always. The little things he did. You know, throughout life was -- the things that I saw were incredible. He always stopped to take time to talk to whoever was around him and just incredibly humble. Very funny, as well. I know you guys played a clip on "Conan." I mean he was -- he kind of starred (ph) that show. But he was just a very humble, loving, fun, wonderful man.

KAYE: He's married with children, as well, correct?

KOS: Yes, ma'am.

KAYE: Have you had any contact with his family?

KOS: I just sent them a message. Yes, I've just sent a few messages of support. But it's certainly an incredibly sad time.

KAYE: How did he do when he came back from war? I mean certainly so many soldiers struggle. How did he handle it?

KOS: You know, when he came back, he -- I think, obviously, the transition from serving our country was four tours of, you know, heavy combat. It was difficult for him to not want to be over there. Obviously, all that stuff's in his book. But he, you know, what I'm most impressed by was he became one of the biggest advocates for his brothers and sisters in the military immediately. So, he turned his time and attention to helping them and, you know, frankly spent the -- over the past year being an advocate and not even focusing on his own business, Kraft International, to be able --

KAYE: And that goes beyond -- that goes beyond exercise equipment. He helped them adjust to life back at home.

KOS: Oh, absolutely. Just -- yes, just like what -- just like what he was doing yesterday. And going on a, you know, four-month book tour to go see people that supported him. So --

KAYE: Did he ever speak to you about any fears that he had, or any issues that he had with anyone that might have led to this?

KOS: No, ma'am. I don't -- I don't think he feared anybody. He was one of the most, you know, truly without ego one of the toughest and strongest and, you know, he was a true man's man, but he also had that balance that made him so special.

KAYE: Well, Jason Kos, we appreciate you talking with us about your friend and we certainly are so sorry for the loss. Thank you very much.

KOS: My pleasure.

KAYE: And we will stay on top of this story all morning and bring you the new details as they come into us here at CNN.

Now, let's take you to Midland City, Alabama, where a desperate standoff is entering its sixth day. Police are keeping in contact with Jimmy Lee Dykes. He is the man who abducted a five-year-old last week and is keeping the boy in his underground bunker. Victor Blackwell is in Midland City.

And, Victor, good morning.

We have heard that Dykes is allowing the delivery of things like toys and food and medicine for this child. Do we know how they're getting it to him?

VICTOR BLACKWELL, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Randi, good morning.

And, no, we don't know how that's being given to Ethan and Jimmy Lee Dykes. And that's one of the questions we asked. We asked specifically how that happened. And like many of the questions we asked, that was not answered. Authorities here are keeping a lot of the details to themselves because they do not want to agitate, as they tell us, Jimmy Lee Dykes.

We can tell you this. That the most recent communication that we've had with authorities is that they say that the line of communication is open both with Jimmy Lee Dykes and they are ready to speak with him, as they say, whenever he is ready to talk. And, also, with the parents of this five-year-old boy Ethan. We're told that they are getting updates every hour on the hour.

And we've also heard from a woman, Michelle Riley, who lives next door to the family. She's making ribbons. Black to mourn the death of the bus driver in this case, Charles Poland, but also with red and blue, the school colors here in Dale County. And she says that these parents are holding up. She says the mother is ready to hold her baby, to bring him home. Here's what she said at a vigil about Ethan.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

MICHELLE RILEY, FAMILY FRIEND: We can fight and we can push through and we can pray, and that our prayers are going to be answered, that Ethan's coming home to be with this -- be with his large family.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

BLACKWELL: Now, today will be the funeral for the bus driver killed in this case, Charles Poland. There's so many people expected to come. There will be a funeral at a civic center instead of a church because the churches here are just too small, Randi.

KAYE: Victor Blackwell, thank you very much.

And coming up at the bottom of the hour, we'll explain the art of hostage negotiations and talk about what police are trying to do and what that little boy might be going through.

Well, it is Super Bowl Sunday and that means the teams and the fans are ready for game time, but one family is especially invested, the Harbaughs. We're live in New Orleans.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

KAYE: Can you feel the excitement? It is Super Bowl Sunday. Christmas for football fans. The pre-game shows are about to start. But we can take you to New Orleans fist. That's right, this morning, with Carlos Diaz.

Carlos, good morning to you.

You've been down there, what, all week? How'd you get this assignment? That's a pretty good one.

CARLOS DIAZ, HLN SPORTS: All week, yes.

KAYE: Yes. So it's game day. What's left for the teams to do? Anything except play the game?

DIAZ: Yes, exactly. I mean what more can you prepare for? That's what happened yesterday. Both teams went through final preparations yesterday. It was a family affair yesterday because, first off, the Ravens hit the Super Dome behind us with 600 of their closest family and friends. No joke, 600 people came in that were family and friends and watched the Baltimore Ravens go through their final run-throughs.

Head Coach John Harbaugh said he wanted it to be relaxed. He wanted it to be a family affair. So he allowed a lot of the players to have some of their family and friends on the field. So you had a lot of youngsters on the field having a good time. He wanted it to be relaxed.

And then afterwards, you had the 49ers come in with 11 bus loads of family and friends. Same kind of deal where they wanted to be relaxed. I mean, basically, if you don't know the game plan by now, you're not going to know it, you know. So it's about being relaxed with your family and with your friends.

And I can tell you this right now. I was walking through the French Quarter yesterday, ran into Jack and Jackie Harbaugh in the French Quarter yesterday.

KAYE: Oh, my.

DIAZ: So they needed to get out yesterday and have -- they're the parents of John and Jim Harbaugh. So they needed to get out and have a little fresh air.

And then, for research purposes only, I did go to the French Quarter late last night to see what it was like. I've been here for several Mardi Grass --

KAYE: Right, research. DIAZ: Research. And I can tell you right now, it was insane. I mean really the crowds are here in full effect. And if you have any question about New Orleans being back after Katrina, New Orleans is definitely back as witnessed by last night's activities.

KAYE: So did the Harbaugh parents even begin to make a pick with you or they wouldn't even go there?

DIAZ: Yes, exactly. I walked -- they said, Carlos, we love John more. No, no, no. They're staying very neutral.

I can tell you this, though. There's one Harbaugh that's already very happy. Joani Harbaugh. The daughter of Jackie and Jack Harbaugh. She is the wife of Tom Crean, who coaches the Indiana Hoosiers. And they beat Michigan last night. And so it looks like the Hoosiers are now the number one team in the country because Kansas lost as well last night. So you have -- so not only do you have John versus Jim today, Jack and Jackie Harbaugh have to watch their daughter watch her husband and the Hoosiers become the number one team in the country. So a lot of things going on with the Harbaugh family.

KAYE: Well, you know, they need a few distractions from today. So I think that's a good thing, actually. Carlos, listen, enjoy New Orleans and you better get back to that research.

DIAZ: Yes. I'm a very thorough researcher. Thorough.

KAYE: I know you are. Enjoy, but don't enjoy too much. Have fun.

DIAZ: All right.

KAYE: Part of Super Bowl weekend is spent celebrating the game and its heroes and that means the Hall of Fame. Seven new members were chosen yesterday, including Super Bowl winning former New York Giants Coach Jim Parcells. Also on the list, Warren Sapp, Cris Carter, Larry Allen, Curley Culp, Dave Robinson and former Baltimore Ravens offensive tackle Jonathan Ogden.

Now to Rochester, New York. At a boys' basketball game, the score was tied with seconds to go in the fourth quarter when this shocked the crowd. Did you see that? The point guard tripped and fell but kept dribbling and made the basket from half-court, leading his team to victory.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

DANIEL "BAY" BARLEY, MADE HALF COURT SHOT: I know that the clock was running down, so I wanted to be the one with the ball. And as I fell, I knew to keep my dribble so I could get back up. And I got back up, I was ready to shoot the ball.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

KAYE: The outcome, Rush-Henrietta boys basketball team beat Greece Athena 57-54. My oh my. Time to pull out your best look and get ready to walk the runway. New York gearing up for Fashion Week and we're giving you a sneak peek at what might be hanging on the racks next fall.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

MERYL STREEP, ACTRESS, "THE DEVIL WEARS PRADA": And then Serilian (ph) quickly showed up in the collections of eight different designers. And then it filter down through the department stores and then trickle on down into some tragic, casual corner where you no doubt fished it out of some clearance bin. However, that blue represents millions of dollars and countless jobs. And it's sort of comical how you think that you've made a choice that exempts you from the fashion industry, when, in fact, you're wearing a sweater that was selected for you by the people in this room.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

KAYE: Of course you remember that classic scene from "The Devil Wears Prada." Anne Hathaway learns that her doubty (ph) blue sweater did, in fact, once have lofty, fashionable beginnings. And the people in that room, or at least their real-life counterparts, will once again gather because fall fashion week is about to start in New York. Nadia Bilchik's joining us today for the most stylish report I think we've ever had.

Good morning to you.

NADIA BILCHIK, CNN EDITORIAL PRODUCER: Good morning.

KAYE: All right, so how did Fashion Week get started? It's so popular, but where did it begin?

BILCHIK: Well, in 1943, during World War II, New Yorkers couldn't get to Paris for Paris Fashion Week, so they created their own. And it became the Fashion Week of New York, in fact, known as Press Week. So, all the way back to 1943. And it now happens twice a year. And it literally goes from New York, then London, Milan and Paris in that order. Now know as the Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week.

KAYE: Gotcha. All right. So this year -- I mean every year's different. So what trends are we looking out for this year?

BILCHIK: Well, we won't know until the models are actually on the runway, but we . are hearing about a lot of color. And we saw it at the SAG Awards. We saw it at the Golden Globes. All kinds of color. I spoke to a designer yesterday. She said she's going to be using magenta, brown and silver. But we're going to be seeing -- and there, of course, you see Jessica Chastain, one of the stars who will no doubt be at Fashion Week this week.

KAYE: It is a see and be seen event. No question about it. I was there once and, I mean, my jaw was dropping at who I was seeing. Who do you think we're going to get to see this year? BILCHIK: Well, we'll definitely see "Vogue" editor Anna Wintour, who was "The Devil Wears Prada," as you remember, the part that Meryl Streep played. And she'll be there in all her glory. And she can make or break a fashion designer.

And then next to her with the flaming red hair, of course, Grace Coddington, her corrective director. And these are the people who really set the trend, probably in some way for what we're wearing right now.

KAYE: No doubt.

BILCHIK: And then the stars. As you said, will there be Kim Kardashian, Reese Witherspoon, Gwyneth Paltrow and some of the young and up and coming stars, as we said. And then, of course, don't forget the designers themselves who have become huge stars. Calvin Klein, Badgley Mischka, Diane von Furstenberg, Rachel Zoe, Tory Burch.

KAYE: They'll all be there.

BILCHIK: So seen and be seen.

KAYE: Yes. And so if you want to go, can you just go?

BILCHIK: You can't. Unfortunately, you can't just go. You have to be a fashion insider, press, having written for a magazine or be a designer in some way.

KAYE: Know someone. Or who knows --

BILCHIK: Exactly. Randi, I'm sure you do.

KAYE: Know someone very important.

BILCHIK: Exactly. But you can get some hotel packages where you go and probably the hotels have some relationship with the fashion house, or be a very prestigious Mercedes-Benz client.

KAYE: All right. Nadia Bilchik, thank you very much. You look very fashionable today, I might add.

BILCHIK: Thank you.

KAYE: Nice to see you.

We could know as soon as tomorrow if the Boy Scouts will lift its ban on gay members. And now Texas Governor Rick Perry is getting into the debate. Hear what he has to say on it.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

KAYE: Mortgage rates continue their upward trend this week. Their highest level in four and a half months. Have a look.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK) KAYE: Welcome back and thanks for starting your morning with us and a very special welcome for our troops watching on the American Forces Network. I'm Randi Kaye. It is now just about half past the hour.

We're following the developments of the shooting death of a former Navy SEAL known as the deadliest sniper in U.S. history. CNN affiliates WFAA and KHOU are reporting Chris Kyle was killed yesterday along with another person at a gun range near Ft. Worth, Texas. Local newspapers also confirm the death. WFAA reports a former Marine suffering from PTSD is being held this morning in connection with the shootings.

These are pictures of Kyle taken from the security company Kraft International that he founded after leaving the Navy back in 2009. Authorities will be holding a briefing at 3:00 p.m. Eastern Time today.

Now, to Washington and a twist in the gun control debate. I want you to look at this picture. It's the president skeet shooting at Camp David. It was taken in August on his 51st birthday. Remember in an interview last week, the president revealed for the first time that he is a skeet shooter, but reporters wanted proof. I guess this is the White House's proof, but the photo was met with skepticism by the NRA. It released a statement saying, "one picture does not erase a lifetime of supporting every gun ban and every gun control scheme imaginable." President Obama heads to Minneapolis tomorrow to promote his gun control plan.

Moving overseas, now authorities in Turkey have found the body of a New York woman who went missing nearly two weeks ago. Police say there are signs 33-year old Sarai Sierra was stabbed. The mother of two had been expected home January 22nd. When she didn't show up her husband and brother went to Turkey to look for her. Our senior international correspondent Nic Robertson is in Ankara with the latest.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

NIC ROBERTSON, CNN CORRESPONDENT: What we are learning now from this semi-official state news agency, Anatolia agency, is Sarai Sierra's body was found in a poorer neighborhood of Istanbul. We also understand from the police that they believe that perhaps her body was taken there from the site that she was killed. They also say that nine people have arrested -- have been arrested in connection with it. The CNN Turk (ph) system that works there says that the police have told them that there is evidence of stab wounds on her body. Obviously, very sad news for her family. Her brother and husband in Istanbul expecting to be taken to identify her body. Not clear why she didn't make that flight home as expected by her family on the 22nd of January. The last communication she had with her family the day before saying she was excited to come home, has been missing all these days since. And now her body discovered in a poorer neighborhood of Istanbul. Nic Robertson, CNN, Ankara, Turkey.

(END VIDEOTAPE) KAYE: Also in Turkey, we're learning more about the suicide bomber who attacked the U.S. embassy in Ankara on Friday. This video shows the bomber. Police say under that heavy jacket, he had more than 13 pounds of explosives and a hand grenade. A leftist group is claiming responsibility for the blast, which killed the Turkish guard and injured a journalist. It hasn't said why it targeted the embassy.

Authorities say it may have to do with the U.S. sending Patriot missiles to Turkey to support rebels in neighboring Syria.

The United States would be willing to engage in direct talks with Iran, but only if Tehran takes them seriously. That's what Vice President Joe Biden told a security conference yesterday in Munich. Talks would focus on Iran's nuclear program. The nation's leaders say they're enriching uranium for peaceful purposes. But the international community has imposed stiff economic sanctions to discourage Iran from developing nuclear weapons.

One influential gun control group is targeting their efforts on Washington for Super Bowl Sunday. Mayors Against Illegal Guns has bought ad time during the Super Bowl to push for universal background checks on all gun purchases. Here's part of that commercial.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The NRA once supported background checks.

WAYNE LAPIERRE: We think it's reasonable to provide mandatory instant criminal background checks for every sale at every gun show. No loopholes.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

KAYE: That ad will only run in the Washington, D.C., area.

Now to Boston where firefighters had to rip off the roof of a charter bus that crashed into a bridge to rescue people trapped inside. The bus was, apparently, too tall to make it under the bridge. It was full of high school students from Pennsylvania who went on a trip to Harvard. More than 30 people were hurt.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

ED HASSAN, BOSTON EMS: Initially on when Boston EMS first arrived, we identified three critical patients on our initial assessment and as the chief said, there were several patients trapped.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

KAYE: Police say they are investigating why the bus was on that road at all since the height of the bridge is clearly marked.

KAYE: All right, now to Alabama and the hostage standoff that is moving into its sixth day. The man holding the five-year-old child in his underground bunker, Jimmy Lee Dykes, is now allowing police to deliver some so-called comfort items like potato chips and toys. Yesterday members of the community gathered for a vigil for the boy and they had this message for Dykes.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: What do you hope, you know, if Mr. Dykes hears this, or sees this, what do you hope he gets from this?

MICHELLE RILEY, MIDLAND CITY, RESIDENT: He just needs to know that, you know, everybody -- everybody makes mistakes, everybody has been through life events that changes them. But Ethan's innocent. You know, let him go home to his mother. Let him go home to his grandparents. Let him come out to the community and let him go back to the school and be with his friends.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

KAYE: Joining me now on the phone to talk about the standoff, is former FBI Deputy Director Tom Fuentes. Tom, good morning to you.

TOM FUENTES, FMR. FBI ASST. DIRECTOR: Good morning.

KAYE: I'm sure you've been paying close attention to this. So, what does Dike's decision to allow this delivery of food and some toys to this boy he has been holding there in that bunker? What does that tell you?

FUENTES: Well, it's actually a good sign that he is trying to take care of the boy or at least indicating that he does not want harm to come to the boy. So, that's a huge thing. It means that there may be some degree of bonding that has occurred or is occurring on his part with the boy and on the boy's part probably with him. You know, many used to call that a bad thing when something equivalent to Stockholm syndrome where the hostage starts to bond with the hostage taker. But in reality it's actually have been found to be a pretty good thing because it indicates that there is going to be less likelihood that he would want harm to come to the boy.

KAYE: Yeah, it could be the boy's ticket to survival, in other words.

FUENTES: Exactly.

KAYE: As we said, we are now in day six of this. Is there anything at this point, anything else that police and investigators can do but wait? I mean can they -- can they negotiate with this guy?

FUENTES: Well, they are negotiating with him. They've been in constant communications through a pipe, which isn't the best system, but they've been in communications with him over the past five days. So, that is a good sign that he's talking and that they're able to discuss this with him. And, as I said, the longer these type of things go. Usually -- in more than 85 percent of the cases the patience pays off and, you know, the individual ends up being rescued. So, I think that's what they're hoping in this case that the patience will pay off that there's no indication presently that the boy is in physical danger and I think that the only concern will be if it's too soon for that at the moment. But the concern would be that the degree to which the boy has been already psychologically harmed and will suffer PTSD and have nightmares and other recurring problems after the incident's resolved, they're weighing that against the fact of the boy's survival at all. And I think that the concern here is that the nature of that bunker would just be too dangerous to try to do an assault on the bunker to try to rescue the boy, that it would be very difficult to do that safely, for the boy, as well as for Dykes.

KAYE: Yes.

FUENTES: The longer he is talking, the longer there is an indication that the boy is physically being taken care of, his medicine has been sent down. And ...

KAYE: What can they ...

FUENTES: ... and other things.

KAYE: ... what can they say to him, though, I mean, if anything? If you were in this situation, I mean. What do they say to him to try and turn this around and try to coax him out?

FUENTES: Well, that he can survive this. And that if he's starting to care for the boy, that he should be concerned about the boy surviving and the boy going back to his parents, family, schoolmates, you know, for his benefit. So I think that's what the authorities will be trying to stress and trying to resolve this in a nonviolent way. So, that's the whole aspect of the discussions, of the negotiations. To try to allay his fears, if you will, that there's an assault coming and that they're going to storm the bunker and, you know, cause violence to him and the boy. So, the longer this goes, I think that's what they're hoping that he will finally just more or less relent. And he may have several weeks of provisions in that bunker. Food and water. We don't know that. We also have neighbors reporting that they had seen the bunker that has a television set in there. So, that's another concern that the images being shown on television and the words being said during press conferences need to keep in mind that he may be watching.

KAYE: Right.

FUENTES: That he may be listening to what we're saying. So, I think that's the concern, is that the communication that the law enforcement is having with him is through direct line through negotiators, but also when the sheriff gives a press conference or a press release, that they're trying to minimize the threat of violence for a successful, peaceful resolution.

KAYE: Yes.

FUENTES: Tom Fuentes, always appreciate your expertise. Thank you so much.

KAYE: Thank you, Randi.

We could know as soon as tomorrow if the boy scouts will lift its ban on gay members. And the debate is heating up. We'll talk to a straight Eagle scout who wants the ban lifted and a father who says lifting the ban will ruin the boy scouts.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

KAYE: Welcome back, everyone. The Boy Scouts of America could decide to lift its ban on gay members as soon as tomorrow. But Republican Governor Rick Perry of Texas says there's no reason to change that ban.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

GOV. RICK PERRY, (R ), TEXAS: Scouting is about teaching a substantial amount of life lessons, sexuality is not one of them. It never has been. It doesn't need to be.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

KAYE: Perry is a former Eagle Scout and spoke yesterday in front of a statewide boy scout meeting. It's not just Governor Perry who was opposed to the change. In an op-ed for the "New York Post," one scout parent argued against it saying this "Imagine that a group of girls is going on a long camping trip supervised by adult volunteers who are young men you barely know. Would you let your 15-year old daughter go? Earlier, I spoke with the parent who wrote that op-ed, Ed Whelan, and he's also the president of the Ethics and Public Policy Center in Washington as well as this man, Eagle Scout Zach Wahls, the executive director of Scouts for Equality. He is straight, but has two lesbian moms. And I started by asking Ed Whelan if he was implying that homosexuality is synonymous with pedophilia.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

ED WHELAN, PRESIDENT OF THE ETHICS AND PUBLIC POLICY CENTER: Not at all. In fact, I think the example I give indicates exactly the opposite. Look, what's an issue here, is that we have an organization that has long stood in defense of traditional , American moral values. And it's attracted parents and supporters from churches precisely because it stood in defense of those values. The Supreme Court has held that the boy scouts have a First Amendment constitutional right to pursue their values and to exclude leaders whose presence would be inconsistent with those values. That includes, by the way, not just gays, but atheists. Now, we can respect and we do respect our fellow citizens who are gays or atheists. We love our relatives and friends who are gays or atheists, but we are not obligated to regard them as suitable to be scout leaders.

KAYE: All right, well, let me ask Zach to weigh in here. Zach.

ZACH WAHLS, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF SCOUTS FOR EQUALITY: You know, I think it is interesting that Ed is going to these, you know, traditional moral values framework. I think what he is trying to do is define this as some particular biblical, literal, fundamentalist tradition that has become popular in the U.S. over the last 40 years. The reality is that there are Christians of all different denominations who are plodding to BSA for this proposed policy change, including the United Church of Christ, one of the BSA's top largest church sponsors, which on Friday issued a statement saying, "The ban is inconsistent with the values of dignity and respect that serves as the foundation of the scouting program." And we couldn't agree more. Even though, Ed might be talking about respect. Respect for him is a one-way street. Nobody is calling for the exclusion of Baptists or Mormons or Catholics or frankly, anybody who even holds Ed's point of view. What we are trying to say, Scouts should be an inclusive program that is experiencing, you know, a large amount of inclusivity because we believe in the values that constitute the program.

WHELAN: The problem here is the boy scouts if they abandon this rule and adopt this notion that different troops can have different policies, it's completely unworkable, it's going to invite legal attacks on the troops that maintain the traditional policies. And Zach and his cohorts are not going to call a peace truce, they are going to realize that the boy scouts can be intimidated, and they are going to continue to intimidate them, and this is just -- this is an unstable stopping point. It's just a path to further surrender.

KAYE: Exactly.

WAHLS: You are speaking -- as an Eagle scout and somebody who actually spent 12 years in the organization, that I simply have to disagree. We're appealing to the traditional values that have been a part of the boy scouts from the very inception in 1903. And I feel that moving forward, this is going to be a part of the program that is fostering inclusiveness, and implying the values and the life-long principles of the boy scouts to the entire, you know, population of young American men, not just those who happen to be straight. And further, none of your point about whether or not this is something that is an unworkable legal solution on a national call to (inaudible) with the boy scouts earlier this week, but the president of the board said currently, you know, with the current ban in place, we don't want to find ourselves in a position where a judge is telling us that we need to expand our policy even further than we're going here. So, even though you might, you know, be looking at this one specific way, the BSA certainly isn't taking that position home.

KAYE: Ed, let me ask you. Because I know you mentioned this change in policy would deprive the troops of protection. Protection from what? What do they need protection from?

WHELAN: They need protection from legal challenges to their decision to exclude gay leaders. The national supreme court organization won that victory 13 years ago. They're throwing it away in a way that would expose local troops and volunteer leaders to lawsuits by activists.

KAYE: Would you want your son, would you want your son to be in the scouts if he was gay?

WHELAN: You know, I think a question like that directed at my son is a rude question. But let me answer it this way. I would not have put my son in a troop with an openly gay leader or an openly atheist leader. And lots of other parents, the most vibrant part of the boy scouts believe the same. So, Zach can cite, you know, one liberal denomination that is satisfied with this proposal. WAHLS: To be clear, it's not just the UCC that has weighed in. Currently, the Mormon church and Catholic church, hardly denominations known for their liberal state (inaudible), declined comment. So, it's only the Baptists--

WHELAN: They're not -- they're not going to approve this. Don't you dare suggest they're going to approve this.

KAYE: Ed, let Zach finish, please.

WAHLS: No, I mean, the point is simply that while there are may be some who are very, you know, opposed to this policy position, there is a vast difference between opposed to gay marriage and opposing the enrichment and development of young men because they happen to be not straight. So, while I think Ed's position, you know, is certainly some, one that I'll respect, and we are not going to try to move his son from the program, I think that he should understand the scouts is about respecting the opinions of all the people who want to be members, not just some.

KAYE: Zach Wahls, Ed Whelan ...

WHELAN: You're not respecting ...

KAYE: I appreciate your time. I appreciate both of you discussing it this morning.

WAHLS: Thank you, Randi, we appreciate it.

KAYE: Thank you.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

KAYE: A good and very timely discussion there.

Lance Armstrong, the Grammies and New York's fashion week this week, certainly going to be a busy one. We'll get you up to speed with what you need to know.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

KAYE: Welcome back, everyone. About seven minutes before the top of the hour now. Time to get you ready for your week ahead. It's going to be another busy one. On Monday we have been talking about the boy scout's possible decision coming Monday. We could possibly hear, according to the reports, that the governing board is going to vote on whether or not to remove the ban on gay members. We could possibly hear a decision on that one on Monday.

Also on Wednesday, we'll be talking a lot about Lance Armstrong. Of course, that is the deadline for him to testify to the U.S. Anti- Doping Agency. Now, you probably remember, he just admitted to Oprah that he used banned substances, and Armstrong's attorney has said that he's not going to testify before the deadline that he has been given. On Thursday we're talking about fashion week this morning. New York begins fashion week. It's going to run until Valentine's Day and after New York it will go to London, Milan and Paris. Events in all of those cities. And on Sunday, it's like the Super Bowl for music, the Grammy Award show. All five nominees for Album of the Year will perform, including Mumford & Sons and Fun. Some nominees for Song of the Year, if you're interested, there is Kelly Clarkson "Stronger" and Taylor Swift's catchy tune "We Are Never, Ever Getting Back Together." Yet another song from Taylor Swift about a break up.

Also this week, the president hits the road to deliver his message on gun control. CNN's Athena Jones has more on that.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

ATHENA JONES, CNN CORRESPONDENT: President Obama heads to Minnesota Monday. His first stop in the campaign to win support for his gun policy proposals, an effort he promised in Newtown.

BARACK OBAMA, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA: In the coming weeks I'll use whatever power this office holds to engage my fellow citizens.

JONES: He'll meet with residence and police in Minneapolis, a city the White House says has taken important steps to reduce gun violence. Over the weekend, the White House released this photo of the president skeet shooting at Camp David last August, a nod to gun sports aimed at signaling law-abiding gun owners have nothing to fear.

Monday's trip follows dramatic testimony on Capitol Hill.

GABRIELLE GIFFORDS, FMR. U.S. REP. (D-AR): It will be hard. But the time is now. You must act.

JONES: Former Congresswoman Gabby Giffords shot in the head two years ago urged Congress to be courageous and support measures like universal background checks and limiting the size of gun magazines. Steps the National Rifle Association rejected.

WAYNE LAPIERRE, CEO, NATIONAL RIFLE ASSOCIATION: Law-abiding gun owners will not accept blame for the acts of violent or deranged criminals. Nor do we believe that government should dictate what we can lawfully own and use to protect our families.

JONES: Analysts are divided over how effective President Obama's campaign-style effort will be.

JOHN HUDAK, BROOKINGS INSTITUTION: He needs to motivate a grassroots effort, in order to come about what will be a very effective interest group effort in opposition to his goals.

ANA NAVARRO, REPUBLICAN STRATEGIST: The President Obama has not done a very good job building relationships with Congress. He needs to do that before he starts putting external pressure on them.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

JONES: The day after the president's trip to Minnesota, a bipartisan group of House members plans to introduce the bill to make firearms trafficking a federal crime and to beef up penalties for people who buy guns for those not allowed to have them. Randi?

KAYE: Athena Jones, thank you very much.

We're learning new details about this morning about the man Iraqi insurgents nicknamed the devil. Former Navy SEAL Chris Kyle fatally shot yesterday at a gun range in Texas. We'll hear from one of his friends.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

KAYE: Taking a look now at some stories that we're following this morning. In San Francisco, police arrested four naked people who were protesting the city's new ban on nudity. The protesters were part of a group of about a dozen people protesting at city hall on Friday, the day the new law went into effect. I love this creative video that we were able to get. The group was in various states of undress, but only those who were fully nude were actually taken into custody.

To Washington state now where a new government job has just opened up. Pot expert. Yes, you did hear me correctly. The state is looking for a marijuana consultant to help craft laws for the newly legal drug. If you're thinking of applying, well, you will need five years of working experience, including how to grow and harvest the plant, as well as experience with cannabis testing. That is exactly what it sounds like, yes.

(MUSIC)

KAYE: Good morning, everyone. Once again, I'm Randi Kaye. It is 7:00 on the East Coast, 4:00 a.m. on the West. Thanks so much for starting your morning with us.

We are following breaking news this morning on the shooting death of a former Navy SEAL known as the deadliest sniper in U.S. history. CNN has confirmed that 38-year-old Chris Kyle was killed yesterday along with a second man at a gun range near Ft. Worth, Texas. These are pictures of Kyle taken from the security company he founded after leaving the Navy.

The gunman accused of killing Kyle and Chad Littlefield has been identified as Eddie Ray Routh. He is in custody facing two counts of capital murder.

Earlier I spoke with one of Kyle's friends, Jason Kos, about the man he called a war hero.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

JASON KOS, CHRIS KYLE'S FRIEND (via telephone): He and a friend took a Marine that was suffering from PTSD to a gun range to shoot and as a way that he always did giving back and, you know, it was certainly him taking his time to help, again, help war heroes. And after --

KAYE: He had quite a reputation in the field as one of the most lethal snipers out there. How did he handle that? KOS: You know, he viewed -- Chris viewed it as his job and he was protecting his brothers, frankly. He as a man was quite contrary to that because he was incredibly loving father and charismatic and really caring person. So, it's quite a contrast from what he did as his job and tours of duty.

KAYE: We are not naming the suspect in this case, but do you know if there was any connection at all, or believed to be any connection between Chris Kyle and this suspect?

KOS: No, ma'am, I have no idea.

KAYE: Was this shooting range somewhere that he would frequent regularly? Where the shooting occurred?

KOS: I believe so, yes. I think he was familiar with the location.

KAYE: And can you tell me about his personal life at all?

KOS: Yes. That's what I know best because I certainly did know him as a Navy SEAL. He was a man of incredible character. He led by example, always. The little things he did. You know, throughout life was just the things I saw were incredible. He always stopped to take time to talk to whoever was around him and just incredibly humble, very funny, as well.

I know you guys played a clip (INAUDIBLE). He kind of starred that show, but just a very humble, loving, fun, wonderful man.

KAYE: He is married with children, as well, correct?

KOS: Yes, ma'am.

KAYE: Have you had any contact with him family?

KOS: Just sent them a message. Yes, I just sent a few messages of support. Certainly incredibly sad time.

KAYE: How did he do when he came back from war? I mean, certainly, so many soldiers struggle. How did he handle it?

KOS: You know, when he came back, he, I think, obviously, the transition from serving our country with four tours of, you know, heavy combat is difficult for him to not want to be over there. Obviously, all that stuff is in this book. But he, you know, what I'm most impressed by is when he became one of the biggest advocates for his brothers and sisters in the military immediately.

So, he turned his time and attention to helping them and frankly spent the last over the past year being an advocate and not even focusing on his own business.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

KAYE: And since I had that conversation earlier this morning with Jason Kos, we have named the suspect in this case -- Eddie Ray Routh. The nonprofit organization that Chris Kyle helped establish for veterans with PTSD said in a statement that their hearts are broken. We expect to learn more about the shooting when police hold a briefing this afternoon at 3:00 p.m.

Now to Washington and a twist in the gun control debate. Take a look at this picture. It's the president skeet shooting at Camp David. It was taken in August on his 51st birthday. Remember, in an interview last week, the president revealed for the first time that he is a skeet shooter but the reporters wanted proof and this is the White House's proof.

But the photo was met with skepticism by the NRA. It released a statement saying, "One picture does not erase a picture of supporting every gun ban and every gun-control scheme imaginable."

President Obama heads to Minneapolis tomorrow to promote his gun control plan.

In Florida, more than 2,500 weapons were collected during an anonymous gun buyback program. Two rocket launchers and 11 stolen firearms were among the weapons turned in. Rocket launchers, can you believe it? Reports say hundreds of people lined up to sell their guns for $75 each, plus ticket to Tampa Bay Rays and Lightning games. The Hillsborough County sheriff's office said the event was so successful, they ran out of money within an hour.

Now to Midland City, Alabama, and we're in the sixth day of that hostage standoff. A 5-year-old boy being held in an underground prison while his desperate family and police can do nothing but wait.

Victor Blackwell is in Midland City this morning.

Victor, so, are police still in contact with Jimmy Lee Dykes? The man who grabbed the little boy?

VICTOR BLACKWELL, CNN CORRESPONDENT: They are and they have been constantly. We're told by one of the special agents with the FBI on scene that the line of communication is open 24 hours a day and they say they're ready to speak with Jimmy Lee Dykes whenever he's ready to speak with them.

It also seems that the sheriff of Dale County, Sheriff Wally Olson, is also using the media to communicate with Mr. Dykes. He said during a news conference that he wants to thank Mr. Dykes to deliver medication and color books and potato chips. But he also he says he thanks Mr. Dykes for taking care of our boy.

We can also about communication on the other side, outside of that bunker. We're told that the parents of this 5-year-old boy, Ethan, are getting updates around the clock every hour on the hour, Randi.

KAYE: And how is the community holding up? Certainly, you can imagine when the media descends there. They can't enjoy being on national TV all the time, certainly over a case like this. BLACKWELL: Well, I can tell you, we haven't met that yet. They want this story to get out. And they've actually, someone here in town has set up a Twitter handle and they are soliciting prayers and well wishes for Ethan and his family.

There's actually a woman here in town, Michelle Riley, who is starting to make ribbons. They're black, blue and red -- black to symbolize the mourning for the bus driver who was killed, blue and red for the school colors here. The mother of this 5-year-old came to her home to pick up some of those ribbons. She said that this mother is ready to hold her child, to bring him home and here's what she had to say about Ethan.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

MICHELLE RILEY, FAMILY FRIEND: Let him come out to the community. Let him go by the school and be with his friends. That's what he wants. He wants to sit in there and learn. He wants to be with his friends. And I just hope that he just has a change of heart. He just, you know, like I said, it's going to be that split second decision that he just -- he's going to change the whole situation.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

BLACKWELL: There's been a vigil every night in this community since the standoff began and today, a lot of the people who had been attending those vigils will attend the funeral for Charles Poland, the bus driver who was shot and killed on Tuesday trying to protect as many children as possible on that bus. It's being held at a civic center and expect a standing room only crowd -- Randi.

KAYE: Certainly a hero in that community. Victor, thank you very much.

Moving overseas now. Authorities in Turkey have found the body of a New York woman who went missing nearly two weeks ago. Police say there are signs 33-year-old Sarai Sierra was stabbed. Her body was found in a poor section of Istanbul.

The mother of two had been expected home January 22nd. When she didn't show up her husband and her brother went to Turkey to search for her. Police have arrested nine suspects in connection with her death.

Richard III is one of England's most famous kings, but the location of his burial site has been a mystery. But that soon might change and we'll tell you why.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

KAYE: Twelve minutes past the hour now. The story of Richard III, a cruel and hunchback king, has captivated history buffs and literary aficionados for hundreds of years and tomorrow, we might get to know a bit more about him and from a very unusual place.

CNN editorial producer Erin McLaughlin joins us now from London. Erin, good morning to you. First off, remind our audience who was Richard III.

ERIN MCLAUGHLIN, CNN EDITORIAL PRODUCER: Well, Richard III was one of the most infamous kings in English story portrayed by Shakespeare himself as a vial and twisted villain. He's been accused of murdering both of his nephews in an attempt to keep hold of the throne.

And he met his demise in 1485 -- all the way back in 1485 during what was called the Battle of Bosworth Field. He was killed in action and Henry VII and the Tudors were victorious in battle. They won the throne. And the burial place of Richard III has long since been forgotten. That is, of course, until now.

Over 500 years later, a team of archeologists are poised to release their findings as to whether skeletal remains found buried in a parking lot, a municipal parking lot in central England are actually the remains of Richard III. The media is dubbing it "the king in the parking lot."

KAYE: Why do they think it is him? Was it apparent how he was killed or something that might have been there in that parking lot as well, all these years later?

MCLAUGHLIN: Well, so far, the evidence that they presented is largely circumstantial. The skeletal remains show signs of trauma, perhaps battle trauma and also shows signs of scoliosis or curvature of the spine and the location itself. All things that are consistent with historic accounts of Richard III's demise.

What experts have done over the past few months is take a look at these remains in greater detail. They're looking at things like carbon analysis, soil samples and even the dentistry, the dental samples, as well as crucially DNA samples. They've taken DNA samples from the skeletal remains and compared that to a DNA sample of a modern day living descendant.

They're planning to release their findings at a press conference tomorrow. I can tell you, we'll be there, as will plenty of other Richard III enthusiasts who are very eager to hear about these findings, Randi.

KAYE: I'm sure. Very exciting stuff for history buffs, no doubt.

Erin McLaughlin, thank you very much. Appreciate that.

Well, it is Super Bowl Sunday and with more than 100 million people expected to tune in, you might be surprised how many of them are women. You'll hear from Holly Robinson Peete, next.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

KAYE: Oh, yes, it's game day. More than 100 million people are expected to tune in for the Super Bowl today, and as many as half of those could be women. Earlier I talked with Holly Robinson Peete, actress, TV host and wife of former NFL quarterback Rodney Peete and asked her why more and more women are tuning in.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

HOLLY ROBINSON PEETE, ACTRESS: Women are watching and not all of them are watching for the Super Bowl spots. I grew up a fan of the Philadelphia Eagles. I'm from Philly. My dad bled eagle green. I learned the game at his knees.

It wasn't until I met my and then married my husband quarterback, Rodney Peete, that I learned about the X's and O's which got me into a chess match of a game. I am a little obsessed. You don't have to go as far as I am. I'm crazy football mama, but you can really just know a couple things and actually enjoy the game.

KAYE: Yes, I often sit there and ask my husband, what did that mean? What was that call? What are we waiting for? But, eventually, I guess I'm learning a little bit more and more.

But women are becoming a bigger and bigger part of the audience. I mean, if you look at the numbers in 2002, 32 percent of Super Bowl watchers were women, and last year, that number was 46 percent, 51 million women.

Why do you think more women are watching? Why this renewed interest and growing interest?

PEETE: Well, I do think there's an interest in the show. The show is just getting bigger when you have half-time acts like Beyonce. You're going to draw a lot of women. So, there's that.

But I do think there are women that understand football more than most people think they do. Certainly us football moms whose kids play on Friday night lights, all kind of things that they know about the game coming from Pop Warner. I mean, we lace the cleats and, you know, we know things.

So, I think a bigger interest just because the game is so much bigger now.

KAYE: Yes.

PEETE: But, you know, everyone watches the super bowl and there are so many fun things for everyone and kids included. It's a family event.

KAYE: You know, some people might say, oh, you know, the women, they just watch to please their husbands or their boyfriends. You don't buy that, do you?

PEETE: Well, listen, I have to say that, you know, it is sometimes nice to know a couple things about the game. You don't want to scream home run during the game.

KAYE: Oh, gosh. It's going to be awful.

PEETE: There's certain things you want to do.

Listen, my husband loves to watch football with me, but, you know, I think it's important that you kind of get into something that your man is into. It doesn't mean you have to.

I'm sorry, I'm struggling with crazy New Orleans wind.

But I think it's really fun. It's fun if you show interest in what he's interested in, as well.

KAYE: Yes, certainly. All right. So, let's talk about the food. You're known as the master of ceremonies for homegating. What exactly is homegating?

PEETE: Well, I am the spokesperson for the NFLl's homegating campaign. Essentially, homegating is tailgating at home. On the weekends, we watch football, football family, food and fun. I mean, it's a great time. Someone called it the last American camp fire football Sundays to gather around and enjoy your family.

KAYE: What's your favorite super bowl dish? Do you have one?

PEETE: I love Philadelphia cheesesteaks nachos.

KAYE: Wow.

PEETE: Nice and low cal. That's my go-to dish on Sundays.

Listen, I really break it out when the Eagles are trailing say in the second half. I'll bust out my nachos and hopefully that will get it going.

There are so many things you can make and just fun to hang out and be with your family.

KAYE: Yes, I got to say you surprise me with that one. But what's your prediction for the game?

PEETE: Oh, wow. Listen, I just predict that they both better win because we've been here with my husband in 2005 where we lost and it's the worst feeling in the world. You get rolled off the field and I still get the shakes when I see confetti from that time.

But, listen, it's going to be a close game, but I think the edge to Baltimore, even though I love the Colin Kaepernick story, I can't believe this is his tenth start. But I think the edge is going to go to Baltimore with the experience at quarterback.

KAYE: Well, listen, I trust you, because you know football. We'll see.

Holly Robinson Peete, thank you so much.

PEETE: It's going to be a great game. KAYE: It is going to be a great game. Thank you so much for joining us.

PEETE: Thank you. Enjoy the game.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

KAYE: We have some exclusive news about the designer behind Beyonce's costumes tonight for half-time show. His name is Rubin Singer and he has a rich family history of dressing everyone from celebrities to royalties, according to his biography. He's worked for Oscar de la Renta, Bill Blass and Stevie Wonder's wife before creating his own brand.

While we don't have the official outfits Beyonce will wear today, you can check out more of his fashion forward couture at RubinSinger.com.

KAYE: Part of Super Bowl weekend is celebrating the game and its heroes. And that means the Hall of Fame. Seven new members were chosen yesterday, including Super Bowl winning former New York Giants coach Bill Parcels. Also on the list, Warren Sapp, Cris Carter, Larry Allen, Curley Culp, Dave Robinson, and former Baltimore Ravens offensive tackle, Jonathan Ogden.

This morning, we are following breaking news out of Texas. Police have identified the suspect accused of killing this former Navy SEAL at a gun range. The latest in just a moment.

But, first, let's check in with Dr. Sanjay Gupta for a look at what's coming up on "SGMD" at the bottom of the hour.

Good morning, Sanjay.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

DR. SANJAY GUPTA, CNN CHIEF MEDICAL CORRESPONDENT: Randi, I reported a lot on concussions. And this morning, I'm going to show some new research that might be a way to diagnose long-term brain damage while players are still living. It's gong to be happening for the first time.

Also, behind the scenes sneak preview of my new fictional medical show on TNT. It's called "Monday Mornings."

We've got all that coming up at 7:30 Eastern.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

KAYE: Welcome back to CNN SUNDAY MORNING. And good morning, Washington. Nice shot of the White House there this morning. It looks like a little bit of a dusting of snow in the background there. Probably pretty cold in D.C.

The president heading where it's even colder tomorrow, to Minneapolis. I think it was minus 14 with the wind chill there yesterday. So, he is going to be pitching his gun control plan tomorrow in Minneapolis.

Well, we're following breaking news this morning on the shooting death of a former Navy SEAL known as the deadliest sniper in U.S. history. CNN has confirmed that 38-year-old Chris Kyle was killed yesterday along with 35-year-old Chad Littlefield at a gun range near Ft. Worth, Texas. These are pictures of Kyle taken from the security company he founded after leaving the Navy. The gunman accused of the shooting has been identified as Eddie Ray Routh. He's now in custody facing two counts of capital murder.

In Alabama, police are keeping in contact with the man at the center of a hostage standoff. Jimmy Lee Dykes holding a 5-year-old boy in an underground bunker. It is the sixth day of the standoff. Dykes allowed police to deliver comfort items for the young boy, little potato chips and toys. And we'll take you live there next hour.

One influential gun control group is targeting their efforts on Washington for Super Bowl Sunday. Mayors Against Illegal Guns has bought ad time during the Super Bowl to push for universal background checks for all gun purchases. Here's just part of that commercial.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

NARRATOR: The NRA once supported background checks.

WAYNE LAPIERRE, NRA: We think it's reasonable to provide mandatory instant criminal background checks for every sale at every gun show. No loopholes.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

KAYE: The ad will only run in the Washington, D.C., area.

The man behind the Etch-a-Sketch has died. Eighty-six-year-old Andre Cassagnes passed away January 16, in the suburb of Paris. His cause of death was not disclosed. Cassagnes created what would become the classic drawing toy in his garage in 1950. It made its debut in 1959.

We told you last week it was so cold that officials in one New Jersey town postponed a polar bear plunge. Well, the event where swimmers go in a dip in frigid water for fun finally happened yesterday. You see it there. It almost looks like summer time. But the temperature was far from it. Yesterday, in Asbury Park, 30 degrees, the water temperature, a balmy 42.

More top stories at the top of the hour when CNN SUNDAY MORNING continues. I'm Randi Kaye.

"SANJAY GUPTA, M.D." begins right now.