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PIERS MORGAN LIVE

Police: Bombing Suspect #2 in Custody

Aired April 19, 2013 - 21:00   ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


ANDERSON COOPER, CNN ANCHOR: I'll be back for another edition of "360" at 10:00 p.m. Eastern. I' m going to stay here on the ground. Our coverage continues right now with PIERS MORGAN LIVE -- Piers.

ANNOUNCER: This is CNN breaking news.

PIERS MORGAN, HOST: I'm going to start with the dramatic breaking news tonight. The second bombing suspect is in custody and alive after an extraordinary battle with police. Nineteen-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, wanted for the deadly attack at the Boston marathon, was driven away by the police just moments ago after being cornered in a boat in the back of a house in Watertown. You're looking at live pictures of that boat. That is a boat in which he was captured.

Anderson Cooper will have the latest in Boston in a moment. But, first, we go to eyewitness Bob Goodman who saw all the drama unfold in the last few minutes.

Mr. Goodman, I understand that you witnessed this end game with this suspect.

Tell me what you saw.

(INAUDIBLE)

MORGAN: Can you hear me, Mr. Goodman?

Seem to have a problem with Bob Goodman.

We may go to Anderson first and come back to Mr. Goodman when that connection is secure.

Anderson, obviously, an extremely dramatic development in the last few minutes. Tell me how it unfolded.

COOPER: Well, dramatic development indeed. Around 8:44, 8:45, our reporter on the scene, Elizabeth Cohen, saw movement, heard police officers break out into applause. Neighbors asked the police, did you get him? One police officer said yes.

Just about a minute after that, the Boston Police Department tweeted out saying the suspect is in custody, that they were sweeping the area.

I'm also here with CNN's Deborah Feyerick who has been reporting on this, using her sources all day long, really for the last 23 hours.

And, Piers, what a 23-hour period this has been --

MORGAN: Anderson, let me stop you, if I can. We just got Bob Goodman again, who is a neighbor who witnessed the whole thing.

Let me go to you again, Mr. Goodman. Can you hear me?

BOB GOODMAN, RESIDENT IN WATERTOWN (via telephone): Yes. I can hear you well.

MORGAN: Mr. Goodman, you live I think three doors down from the house where this boat was, where the suspect was finally arrested. Tell me what you saw.

GOODMAN: Well, what I saw, when the ban was lifted around I think it was 6:00 or 6:30, we went out for a short walk and when we were halfway around the block, about 25 police cars came screeching down the street, and it obviously looked like they were on to something. Then it was just a matter of minutes before (INAUDIBLE) came and the SWAT team and so forth.

So, that's what we saw initially. Then we saw, you know, just many, many, many, many hundreds and hundreds of law enforcement officials flooded into the neighborhood.

MORGAN: And when it came to the actual moment of capture and arrest, did you actually see that happening?

GOODMAN: No. We did not see that happening. We knew when it happened because a big round of applause went up, you know, but the people who were there. I think it was probably law enforcement who applauded first, and then all the neighbors heard it. So we all applauded.

MORGAN: It's obviously been a very tense time for everybody in that neighborhood. How are you feeling now it's all over?

GOODMAN: It's been a horrendous week because in many different ways, all of us have experienced the horror of the bombing. Myself personally, I was down, I was about 10 yards away from the second bomb explosion. So it was a situation where we were, you know, recovering from what happened on Monday and then for some of us who live in Watertown, especially in this neighborhood, it was kind of what we had already been through. So, it's been tough.

MORGAN: You feel very relieved, I would imagine, it's all over.

GOODMAN: I feel very relieved. I'm still a little scared but I absolutely feel relieved.

MORGAN: Well, I'm delighted for you and for everybody in that neighborhood. It's been an extremely worrying week, very, very worrying last few hours. We now have this man in custody.

GOODMAN: Yes. This is a very, very tight-knit neighborhood and you know, we've never seen anything at all remotely like this, ever.

MORGAN: Mr. Goodman, thank you for calling in. We appreciate it. Congratulations that it's all over.

GOODMAN: You're quite welcome. Thank you.

MORGAN: Thank you very much.

We're going to turn now to Susan Candiotti.

Susan, you're on the ground there. The mood seems to be one of great relief and celebration.

SUSAN CANDIOTTI, CNN NATIONAL CORRESPONDENT: Oh, it's jubilation here. What a sea change in attitude here. Earlier in this day, it was like a ghost town. It was an eerie feeling, very surreal, and now as soon as word came that the suspect was in custody, cheers erupted and they're still cheering.

Hear it now.

Every time they see a police car going by, you hear the reaction.

MORGAN: Yes, amazing.

CANDIOTTI: It's cheers, it's smiles.

They're loving this, every time an ambulance was going by and they're going back, you could see the police officers also shaking hands with each other. As soon as we got word that the suspect had been captured and now, applause all the way around.

You know, every time they see a police officer go by, that must be a very good feeling for them that they were successful in bringing this suspect into custody -- Piers.

MORGAN: Let me go to Drew Griffin. He's about a block away from you.

Drew, the mood there I would imagine is also one of great relief.

DREW GRIFFIN, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Total, total relief. The people who have been cooped up all day in their homes just wondering what to do are now driving around. They still can't drive freely. That's just because of the police traffic we're seeing back and forth.

But there is a great sense of relief. People coming up to us and saying what a relief it is for them to finally have their lives back, because they really, I mean, by the police's own admission and warnings, they really felt under threat in this town, Piers. So it is a great relief but boy, it was a harrowing afternoon to have to go through to get here. That's for sure.

MORGAN: Drew, there was a further gun battle this evening shortly before he was finally apprehended. What did you hear and what do you think was going on there? GRIFFIN: Well, I tell you, you say gun battle. I don't think it was a gun battle. I think what I heard literally just in the waning moments of the press conference which was announcing that basically they were going to have the movement out of Watertown, we heard bursts of automatic gunfire from what sounded like I would say four weapons. They sounded all like the same weapon, in terms of, you know, their make and model.

So I'm only assuming that was a one-way shot being fired from police to the direction of the suspect. I didn't hear anything after that. Then silence and then, all of a sudden, we saw this tremendous amount of police response going to the area which we know now is the boat where this person was hiding. But it was unmistakable bursts of gunfire that began this.

MORGAN: Drew, for now, thank you very much indeed. I will go to Jason Carroll now.

Jason, I think you're about a block away from the house and the boat where this suspect was finally apprehended. Tell me what you saw this evening.

JASON CARROLL, CNN NATIONAL CORRESPONDENT: Piers, let me tell you what I'm hearing first. That's the same applause you heard from Susan Candiotti -- applause and shouts of neighbors who are gathered around this area. Every time an emergency vehicle comes through, you can hear their shouts, you can see them.

Steve, why don't you just take the camera there, you can see some of the folks standing over there.

That's what they have been waiting for, a lot of these guys coming out. You have to imagine how these people feel, Piers. They have been cooped up inside their homes, trying to explain to their children what's going on in the neighborhood so you have to imagine the fear that some of these people were living with. And then the sense of relief when they found out the suspect was in custody.

What a difference it was between what we're experiencing now versus what it was like when we first got here about a little bit more than an hour and a half ago, Piers, when we got here. We heard the flash-bangs. We heard what appeared to be gunfire as well.

More applause is what we're hearing now as more emergency vehicles come out of the area now that it's secured. So when we were here, we heard a very active scene with a lot of police activity. People coming out of their homes, when they heard gunfire -- some 20 shots by accounts from some of the people who were inside.

And now, imagine what it's like now, where you've got this feeling of jubilation now that the word has spread that the suspect is finally in custody -- Piers.

MORGAN: Remarkable scenes.

We get back to Anderson Cooper. Anderson, it's been a quite extraordinary 24 hours. I came off air about just before 1:00 in the morning last night, when there had been this shooting at MIT, a police officer had been killed, but at that stage, there was no direct link to the Boston marathon bombings, and as the night progressed, the link became ever more pronounced, and we have arrived at where we are now. What a remarkable 24 hours.

COOPER: It is. Really, sort of the end game really has played out over the last two hours or so from the moment Drew Griffin heard that burst of automatic weapon fire, then large numbers of law enforcement personnel zeroing in, surrounding, trying to secure the perimeter around that house, particularly around that boat, a small boat in dry dock in a backyard, some plastic that had been covering it flapping in the breeze.

As night fell, authorities lit up the scene with lights both from choppers and on ground lights and from surrounding buildings, deployed flash-bang grenades, a number of flash-bang grenades, could have been to disorient the subject, could have been also to test whether or not the subject was in fact conscious, to see whether the subject was actually reacting to those grenades.

Our Deb Feyerick reporting that the subject does have some medical issues, needs medical attention, and then again, just around 8:44, 8:45, Elizabeth Cohen reporting the suspect had been taken out, removed from the scene. The crowd broke into applause, a police officer confirming in fact that they have the suspect in custody, and that was followed up very quickly by a tweet from the Boston Police Department.

Of course, there is celebration, no doubt, in bars throughout the city of Boston and all over, a lot of bars are probably going to be opening up. I think a lot of people also, their thoughts and prayers continue to be with all those runners, all those citizens, all those fellow citizens of ours who are still in the hospital, whose lives have been forever changed and all those families who are celebrating the fact that these two suspects have been accounted for, they have lost loved ones.

A police officer, 26-year-old police officer killed in the early morning hours, about 23 hours ago last night. A little boy, 8-year- old boy, Martin Richard, dead. A young woman dead, two young women dead. Another police officer badly wounded.

This is a city which was never broken. She was a city which was never on its knees. This is a city which has continued to stand tall, a city which was battered on Monday but today is standing tall and moving forward, and next year, I talked to so many people today who say even if they're in bad shape, they want to try to run that race next year and if they can't run it, they want to be there because they want to send a message that this city is a tough, strong city and a proud city, and it's going to continue forward no matter what happened.

MORGAN: Absolutely right. Anderson, probably of crucial importance, significance, they managed to take this suspect alive because his older brother is already dead. Had he died, too, we don't know the extent of his injuries at this stage, then they may never have got to the bottom of what happened. But as long as he's alive they have a chance of finding out the motive for what they did.

COOPER: That's exactly right. Certainly, that would have been the hope that law enforcement could take the subject alive not only for the sake of justice but also to gather more information. Obviously he has the option of talking. He could also just clam up and ask for an attorney. He's already been read his Miranda rights by the FBI.

But if he does have some sort of a political issue, some sort of a grudge that he wants people to know about, he may feel it's in his best interest to talk and that is certainly what law enforcement is hoping. They still want to find out are there other suspects, are there people who were accomplices in one way or another, either at helping to plan the bombing, helping plan the subsequent activities, helping plan the manufacture of this device. They want to know why these people did this and more importantly, how they went about doing it, any other people of foreign or domestic, they were in contact with and if he starts to talk, that will obviously help the investigation tremendously.

MORGAN: Anderson, you've done a great job today. Thank you very much for now.

I want to turn to CNN's Brian Todd in Watertown, who shot exclusive video of the boat while the bombing suspect was still inside it.

Brian, a quite dramatic end game here to what has been an appalling few days for the people of Watertown in particular. Tell me about the boat and why it hadn't been discovered earlier that he was inside it.

BRIAN TODD, CNN CORRESPONDENT: You know, I just don't know the answer to that question about why it hadn't been discovered. We were coming back from that area, I was telling my team that there may be a chance that he could have been hiding in there for much of the day while they were searching houses in that area, but I guess we'll find some of that information out later.

When we got to that area in back of the house, I'd say it was probably 250 to 300 yards away from the boat. They had floodlit the boat pretty much focusing the floodlights only on the boat. Sometimes they would floodlight the entire backyard, but really keeping the lights on the boat.

And then we heard a loud speaker, it was clearly a police official saying to the suspect, we now know was very likely the suspect inside that boat, we know you're in there, come out with your hands up, come out on your own terms.

We filmed a little bit of that. We saw the wrapping of the boat kind of flapping in the wind. We thought we may have detected some movement but we figured out later that was probably just the wrapping flying around. We didn't hear any of the flash-bangs. We did not hear any gun shots at that point.

It clearly looked to us like a negotiation and we did film some of that. But at that point, I'd say two or three police officers rushed toward us, pushed us back and said you've got to get out of here, got to get around this corner, you're in the area of the cross- fire.

We were pushed around the corner and they kind of kept pushing us out of there. A little bit later, we repositioned ourselves on the top of a rooftop of some kind of a car dealership or something, there was a ramp to get up there so we walked up there and we got a little bit of video from a little further away but by that point, the scene had clearly calmed down.

The floodlighting had gone away. There was some flashlights moving around the backyard. A police chopper had come back and kind of -- was surveilling the scene. By that point, it had really calmed down quite a lot. I think that was after they had taken the suspect into custody.

MORGAN: Indeed. Brian, thank you very much indeed.

Just to remind viewers tuning in, there has been a big end game now to this Boston marathon manhunt. Dzhokhar Tsarnaev has been detained by the authorities down in Watertown. He's believed to be alive although he has suffered wounds.

I want to bring in CNN senior medical correspondent, Elizabeth Cohen, who joins me on the phone. She is in Watertown.

Elizabeth, what do we know about the injuries he may have sustained?

ELIZABETH COHEN, CNN SENIOR MEDICAL CORRESPONDENT: You know, we don't know much about the injuries, Piers. We do know, we were just told by police that he was taken away in an ambulance so he was not taken away in a police car as we were told, he was taken away in an ambulance.

So, again, we don't know much about the injuries. There are several hospitals very, very close to here so they don't have to go far to get care for him.

MORGAN: We're going to go to Susan Candiotti.

Susan, I think you've got some local residents with you who are all both relieved and jubilant this evening.

(CHEERS)

MORGAN: Can you hear me, Susan?

CANDIOTTI: Yes. I hear you.

Here we go. Listen, Piers -- we're now joined by some of the people that you've been hearing shouting and chanting and screaming and applauding after learning the news that the suspect is now in custody.

Tell me about the feeling that you got when you heard that news.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Tremendous feeling of relief. I mean, with what all the city has put up with this week, it's just incredible. It's an incredible moment here. I'm very happy he was contained and alive, too.

CANDIOTTI: What has it been like for you these past several days and especially in the last 24 hours, when you had to stay inside your home, not knowing what would happen next. What was that like?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I think we were all just really on edge, really nervous about what was going to happen next. We heard a lot of sirens going back and forth. We live really close by. An so, we weren't sure what to expect. A lot of false alarms.

CANDIOTTI: What did you think about, learning that he was living here or at least hiding out here during the last 24 hours?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It was terrifying. We had absolutely no idea where he could be, where he could be located. We kept looking out in our backyard. There are a lot of places to hide. We're just so grateful and recharged right now that he's been found and so happy. Can't thank the Watertown and Boston Police Departments enough.

CANDIOTTI: How does this city bounce back, because we have to remember all the victims. Three people were killed as a result of this, almost 200 people injured. How does Boston come back?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Oh, geez. Well, you know, time heals all wounds, right? This is a very resilient city. I know that Boston will bounce back because it always does.

CANDIOTTI: We don't know the status of the individual who has been -- who is in custody right now. What do you think should happen next? What would you like to see?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Well, it's been a harrowing time for us and I'm sure for the victims' families and friends who have been spending a long week wondering where he's at. So the legal process, he'll go through due process and have to take the next steps.

CANDIOTTI: This cheering is something that you don't often see when something like this happens. What an amazing thing that was to see. It just seems sort of spontaneous. Was it?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Yes. Oh, certainly.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Yes. I think we just wanted to come out with the community of Watertown and we've all been through a lot in the last 24 hours, and just sort of be together as a community and be happy and celebrate this moment which is obviously very tragic and heartbreaking, but it's Boston strong. I'm very happy.

CANDIOTTI: Always remembering the victims as well. Thank you very much for joining us.

So, Piers, there will be a lot of celebrating tonight, especially in Watertown. Their nightmare, you could say, is over finally with this suspect being in custody. And now it's a matter of trying to get life back to normal here while we still have a number of questions about what happened here tonight.

For now, it is simply a feeling of pure joy that finally, this is over.

Back to you.

MORGAN: Yes, fantastic scenes there and quite right, they have been through hell and back all week and in particular, the last 24 hours. People of Watertown, quite rightly, celebrating now and with a huge sense of relief.

Got a great tweet here. This is from the mayor of Boston, Tom Menino, shaking hands with Governor Deval Patrick. The message very simple, it says, "Teamwork."

It really has been remarkable teamwork down there from all the authorities involved. I will go to Juliette Kayyem, CNN contributor, former U.S. assistant secretary for homeland security.

Juliette, this has been a stunning victory for the authorities, hasn't it?

JULIETTE KAYYEM, CNN CONTRIBUTOR (via telephone): Remarkable victory. I don't think anyone is going to do anything but be happy for a few hours. Utter exhaustion by the first responders, given that this started on Monday. And it was textbook in so many odd ways, given how big this was, that the authorities put together a bunch of pieces, got some pictures, went public with the pictures and then we've had a wild 23 hours and one suspect is dead and one is in custody.

So while it was unbelievably large, very tense, very scary for people who live here, that part of it is over.

MORGAN: We got Bob Baer.

Bob, with all your experience working with the CIA, has this been a textbook operation by the authorities here? It seems like it. Seems like they basically have played this from the moment they put out the images yesterday to the moment today they said to the public get back out there, almost immediately they got tips on both of those occasions, which have finally led to the capture of this suspect number two.

BOB BAER, FORMER CIA OFFICER: Well, I think the police and FBI have done a great job. They went through those videos, they went through the cell phone numbers, they focused on the guy. They got a lead. It went out to the community.

These men apparently had no exit plan except a fight, if one of them indeed had a suicide vest.

This is textbook. It was brilliant. The rescue, capturing the guy alive, is absolutely going to be crucial because apparently the elder brother had been in some sort of training, some sort of contact with an al Qaeda-like group. This is early reporting. It could be very well wrong.

And, you know, we're going to get a lot out of this young man's interrogation and we're going to find out if this was sponsored from overseas. I think the interesting thing is the Russians apparently came to Washington and brought the elder brother's name up. The question is what did they tell them and why was this not followed up.

A couple days ago I said I didn't think this was an intelligence failure but if, in fact, the Russians did warn us about him, we could be something else here.

MORGAN: Let me ask you about that, Juliette Kayyem, because that could be a big question mark once the celebration of this particular operation which has clearly been successful, once that dies down, there will be an inquest into what has gone on in the background to all this, and it has turned out the FBI did indeed interview one of these two brothers two years ago and he is somebody that they now believe was having quite serious Islamic fundamentalist development in his life, will there be raised eyebrows about this?

KAYYEM: There probably will. There always are. Let's see where these facts take us.

These are early reports. The FBI has confirmed that they did interview him and so we are just going to see.

It is at this stage looking back, it's important for two reasons. One is of course intelligence failures, did we have any information, but also on the response, you know, were there lessons learned in terms of what has unfolded the last five days?

But those are two important points and that should be natural. We talk about a resilient society. One of the aspects of a resilient society is we learn from mistakes made in the past.

But the other aspect of this that I do, I want to make clear, this was not political. There is about to be likely a huge political debate about the use of our U.S. criminal courts for terrorism cases. I stand pretty firm as many people in the counterterrorism field do that our courts have the capacity to take any suspect like this and process them, use evidence against them, convict them and put them into jail.

But we are about to embark on something that is unique for the U.S. we have not had a case like this in a long while. But it's just important for people to know that while this has been very unfamiliar the last couple of days, this will be a very familiar court case, lots of attention of course, but using federal terrorism charges which is why they were written against the defendant.

MORGAN: Juliette, you're in Boston, you're a resident of Boston.

KAYYEM: Yes.

MORGAN: You've had a gruesome week from start to finish, really. And it's ended on this great high. How are you feeling personally about the way this has all played out tonight?

KAYYEM: Well, I'm feeling good. I used to be the homeland security advisor for this governor, Governor Patrick, so know all the key players and know -- I really believe that their sort of public calmness, even when they were saying things that were terribly scary, was really important for the citizens of Boston. And so, they should be.

I want to commend them for that as well as a citizen of Boston. We will regroup. I live about two miles down the street and I haven't been able to get home because of this voluntary shelter in place. It will be nice to do so tonight.

MORGAN: Well, good luck. Get back home and toast what's been a great end to a very difficult week. Now, we are awaiting a police news conference which will, of course, be brought to you live as soon as it starts.

But joining me now is Chris Swecker who led the FBI manhunt for bomber Eric Rudolph. This has been a successful operation by the FBI, hasn't it?

CHRIS SWECKER, FORMER FBI ASSISTANT DIRECTOR: Yes, it has been, by all law enforcement. This clearly was a unified effort. I'm very encouraged by the fact that I did not see any evidence of in-fighting whatsoever.

MORGAN: I've got two great legal brains with me here, Jeffrey Toobin and Alan Dershowitz.

Does the real -- does the real difficult stuff start now, Jeffrey? What is going to happen now procedurally that they've got him under arrest and have him alive?

JEFFREY TOOBIN, CNN SENIOR LEGAL CORRESPONDENT: There are two big questions right away. First, he got his Miranda warnings. Did he talk to the police? That is a very important question because obviously, we want to know what he knew and why he did what he did. If he got the Miranda warnings as we expect, he will have made that decision.

Is he in physical condition to talk to the police? That is an issue we don't know about. He will then be arraigned. He will then be taken to a court, maybe tomorrow, maybe Monday. Again, that depends on his health.

He'll get a lawyer. There will be a decision made about bail. Obviously, he's not getting out on bail. But at that point, the legal proceeding will begin. A 30-day deadline will go into place and a grand jury will hear evidence and he will be indicted in the next 30 days. Those are the first legal steps.

MORGAN: Amid the jubilation we should remember the lives that were so brutally cut down. Three were killed at the marathon. Scores more injured. The MIT police officer last night, also lost his life.

This has been a terrible week for Boston and for America. It's clearly an act of terrorism. One perpetrator dead, his brother alive.

The reaction of the people on the streets, of jubilation. These are potential jurors down the line.

Alan Dershowitz, how will that play out, do you think?

ALAN DERSHOWITZ, ATTORNEY: Well, he will get a fair trial. He will get as fair a trial as he can possibly get. They may have to move it from Boston to western Massachusetts. He's going to have to get a lawyer and that lawyer is going to become one of the most unpopular people in the United States because he's going to have to zealously defend his client.

First thing, he will ask his client is what do you want to do, do you want to cooperate. Do you want to make this into a political case? Do you want to blame it on your brother and say you were duped by an older brother. What kind of defense, if any, do you want to put forward?

But whatever the defense attorney does, people will blame him for his client's activities, but fair trial requires a zealous defense. And this case has to be tried in federal court, because this is an American citizen, this is a domestic crime committed right in the middle of Boston. There's no option other than regular ordinary criminal trial.

TOOBIN: And, remember, the politics have already begun to infect this process. Lindsey Graham, the senator from South Carolina, tweeted this afternoon before there was an arrest, I hope they don't give him Miranda warnings. I hope they just interrogate him because it's too important for the legal system.

Lindsey Graham will not be the only person in the United States thinking that.

MORGAN: I'm hearing on that very point that he has not been given his Miranda rights.

DERSHOWITZ: Well, let me tell you -- the Supreme Court of the United States said a few years ago that he doesn't have to be given his Miranda warnings as long as they don't use any confession against him in his own criminal trial, they can interrogate him. They can even use extreme measures that the Fifth Amendment only applies to admitting evidence at a trial. It was a 5-4 decision but it is the law of the land today.

TOOBIN: That's right. So the idea is they can interrogate him without giving him Miranda warnings, but they can't use that -- those statements against him in his case. They can use them for intelligence purposes, for purposes of trying to find other conspirators, but the legal process starts to get complicated in that regard.

(CROSSTALK)

MORGAN: I'm going to leave it there for now. We will go to Deb Feyerick who has an update on this presser involving the police and other authorities -- Deb.

FEYERICK: We do. Actually, one piece of information that we're getting from a source is that the suspect is actually not in good condition. He was injured. He was taken to the hospital and he is being treated there.

So everybody's going to be keeping an eye on that to see what happens. But, yes, it's rather interesting because we were there very early. We got to the site about 4:00 in the morning. We are now being told that he was in a boat, authorities believe, for almost -- that was just four blocks away.

So it's pretty remarkable about how this whole thing played out, just to see the fact that he was there and the way that police really and law enforcement authorities were able to execute this so properly. There was such a huge presence of law enforcement. We're talking thousands of people who were on the ground and they were sectioning off the entire area going block by block, checking the homes as they went, and there was one area that was of particular interest, and when it got quiet later -- earlier in the afternoon, we were told in fact they may be letting him rest to either give him some time to flush himself out, or pinpoint his exact location which clearly, they were able to do.

So there is going to be a 9:30 presser. We are hearing that there is going to be obviously some information and sort of applause that will be coming out of that press conference, the fact that he's there and he's in custody but again, we do want to tell people that he was injured. There were some shots that were fired. Plus, he may have been injured even before he got to that location. So there's still a few wild cards in all of this. They do believe clearly that this is without question the person. You can hear all the cheering that's going on.

We do also want to tell you that somebody else was taken into custody and what's interesting is authorities also seized this individual's car. The license plate of that car reads "terrorist 1."

MORGAN: Wow.

FEYERICK: So we will have a lot more information coming up at 9:30.

MORGAN: We are going live right now to this press conference. Let's just go over and see what they have to say.

COL. TIM ALBEN, MASSACHUSETTS STATE POLICE: I thought you all went home.

We are so grateful to be here right now. We are so grateful to bring justice and closure to this case. To those families that lost loved ones or suffered injuries that they'll live with the rest of their lives, for a police officer, a young man starting a career at MIT and a police officer with MBTA who almost lost his life, and from neighborhoods that lived in fear for an entire day, we are eternally grateful for the outcome here tonight.

We have a suspect in custody.

I want to thank all of the partners who worked tirelessly over the last four days, including the FBI, the transit police, our brothers with the Boston Police Department, U.S. attorney's office, and the support that we've gotten from our governor over the last four days.

We're exhausted, folks, but we have a victory here tonight. But let's not forget those people along the way. Thanks very much.

Governor?

GOV. DEVAL PATRICK (D), MASSACHUSETTS: Thank you. Well, on behalf of Krystle and Martin and Lingzi, on behalf of the MIT officer who was lost last night and the transit police officer who was injured, on behalf of the hundreds of people who were hurt by the explosions at the marathon, I want to say how grateful I am to the colonel, to the special agent in charge, Rick Deslauriers, to all the law enforcement who worked so well and so hard together, together, to bring us to tonight's conclusion.

It was a very, very complicated case, a very challenging case, and there are still some questions remaining to be answered. But as the colonel said, because of that extraordinary collaboration and cooperation by all of these law enforcement resources and assets and more to the point, people, professionals, who brought their "A" game, we have a suspect in custody tonight.

I want to also just thank all of the members of the public for their extraordinary patience. Their participation in this investigation by reviewing photographs of their own and others that were up through the media, and we thank you for that, and helping us narrow in on these suspects. They were helpful and patient and we are grateful for that as well. It's a night where I think we're all going to rest easy -- Carmen.

CARMEN ORTIZ, U.S. ATTORNEY: Good evening. I'm United States Attorney Carmen Ortiz.

And I have to say that both the governor and the colonel have put it tremendously well. Tonight, we feel a tremendous sense of gratitude and relief. The ordeal that this community, especially this neighborhood, has endured over the last 24 hours, tonight we can sleep a bit easier.

And all of the unpredictable, horrific and yet heroic acts that have occurred over the last several days starting with the terrible bombing attacks that occurred on Monday, here we are and not forgetting the victims of the crimes that have occurred over the last several days. The victims of the bombings, as the governor said, Martin, Lingzi, Krystle, two officers have been hurt, one who lost his life, Sean Collier, Richard Donohue who is fighting for his life. Our thoughts and our prayers are with their families.

Tonight, you are going to have many questions but I want to say as I have said the last several days, this has been a very active and ongoing investigation. And although for some of you, tonight is a closure, for me, the journey continues. And so this will continue to be an ongoing and active investigation as we sort all the details, continue to evaluate a tremendous amount of evidence and file our formal charges.

But I will say this: I have never been prouder to stand with a tremendous group of law enforcement here, from the colonel to the commissioner to my federal colleague, Rick Deslauriers with the FBI. All of the federal agencies, the state and local departments that have worked so hard, so hard since the attacks on Monday, so committed and putting their lives on the line as we fought the last 24 hours to try to get a suspect into custody.

And so my journey and my office's journey begins, and this investigation will continue so we will not be able to provide the details that you may want at this time. But as the days continue, you will get answers to those questions. Thank you.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Mayor Menino?

MAYOR TOM MENINO, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS: I just want to say very briefly -- thank you, thank you, thank you. Thank you to the law enforcement officials who worked together, state police, Boston police, FBI, all working together. That's when government works the best.

I want to thank also the citizens out there.

For the last week, unknowing what's happening out there because of the bombing at the marathon, but today, because of the hard work of so many individuals, by Boston police working together with the state police, we have a conclusion that we're all satisfied with.

Also, folks -- remembering the folks that lost their lives this past week.

We shall go on. We're a better city than what happened this past week and we'll get better.

To all of you folks in the media, thank you for the support you gave us for this past week. It wasn't easy. Some days you said to us why. Let me tell you, they were working hard.

I spent a lot of time with law enforcement officials. They worked so hard this week to come to a conclusion. Tonight is a night we say thank you to them. The work they did, tracing down every one of those leads that we got. It's so significant that we came to the end of this case today.

Now, it's up to her job. I feel so good about this, I tell you. I'm so happy because the people in the greater Boston area will be able to sleep tonight because of the work of these individuals.

RICK DESLAURIERS, FBI SPECIAL AGENT-IN-CHARGE: Good evening. My name is Rick Deslauriers. I'm the special agent in charge of the FBI's Boston division. It seems like many months since Monday, April 15th, the day of the Boston marathon bombings. Yet it has been merely five days since the tragic explosions that took three lives, critically injured over 180 spectators and instilled terror and fear among the citizens of the city of Boston, the commonwealth of Massachusetts, and elsewhere.

Today, the city of Boston, the city of Cambridge and the city of Watertown, and many other communities can breathe a sigh of relief knowing that two perpetrators who caused so much pain and anguish are no longer a threat to our personal safety and to our communities. Together, with the action and support of our Joint Terrorism Task Force partners, many of which are on the stage with me this evening, the FBI and our partners remain vigilant and continue to follow through thousands of leads and sifted through hundreds of tips, through thousands of man-hours to reach this moment.

This was truly an absolutely intense investigation and I do emphasize a truly intense investigation. As a result of that, justice is being served for the victims of these terrible crimes.

I want to personally express the FBI's profound thanks to each of our partners for bringing us to this moment here this evening. No one agency alone accomplished this critically important task of keeping the city of Boston and the commonwealth of Massachusetts safe.

Thank you very much. And I support you -- I thank you for your support of our media campaign the other day which publicized the photos. I thank you very much for the support the media provided us on that. It was phenomenal. I think each and every one of you tonight. Thank you.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Commissioner Davis?

ED DAVIS, BOSTON POLICE COMMISSIONER: Four days ago, my city was ruthlessly attacked. There's no explaining the savagery involved here. There's no explanation for it.

I spent the last several days looking at hundreds of hours of videotape. I got to see how brutal that attack was over and over and over again. But more importantly, I got to see what the Boston police officers who responded to that scene, along with the medical personnel and the other first responders did to put people back together.

Tourniquets, stemming the bleeding with their hands, putting a man who was on fire out with their hands -- these are the kind of things that came out of this savagery. It makes me proud to be a Boston police officer. It makes me proud to be a part of this team. Rick Deslauriers from the FBI could not be more cooperative. We've sat together almost hour for hour for the last four days, sharing every single bit of information in a real team. Colonel Alben, the same way. Carmen Ortiz with us all the time.

And then, to bring the governor and the mayor together, leading the city of Boston in responding to this. I finally just want to say that the citizens of this city have been incredible. They have been patient with us. They have endured an enormous amount of heartache and aggravation over the last four days. We're very happy to try to put this back together. Thank you.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Watertown Police Chief Deveau?

ED DEVEAU, WATERTOWN POLICE CHIEF: As the police chief of Watertown, I can't be prouder of my community and the men and women of the Watertown Police Department. What they've been through, what we've been through the last 24 hours, I wouldn't want to see another police department go through.

The support that we've had from all the different agencies mentioned tonight over the last 24 hours has been incredible. To see so many agencies work together with the governor, with the mayor of Boston, and our officials in Watertown, has been really great.

I have spoken to the people in Watertown before but I can't thank you enough. The community stood strong and it was a call from a resident in Watertown, we asked you to remain vigilant and you did. We got that call and we got the guy.

So we can't thank you enough. You've done everything and more that we've asked. Extremely proud of law enforcement today and what we've accomplished. Thank you.

REPORTER: Chief, did you have communication with the suspect?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Excuse me. We're not done. Chief MacMillan from the MBTA?

CHIEF PAUL MACMILLAN, MBTA: I just want to thank all those who sent their thoughts and prayers to Officer Donohue and his family. Please know that it was deeply appreciated. Thank you.

I also want to commend all of the law enforcement agencies who took part in this. This is truly dedication and commitment at its best. I'm proud to be part of it. Thank you.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Special agent in charge of the ATF.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: My name (INAUDIBLE) special agent in charge of the ATF.

Today, the entire world witnessed this law enforcement community's commitment to apprehending these offenders. Make no doubt that this combined effort will never cease in its protection of every city, every town and every neighborhood in our nation. The prayers from every ATF employee will continue to go out to the victims as they heal from this senseless act of violence.

May God bless the citizens.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Suffolk County district attorney Dan Conley.

DAN CONLEY, SUFFOLK COUNTY DISTRICT ATTORNEY: Thank you very much.

I was listening to the police action all afternoon on the radio, and I would like to join my voice or add my voice, I should say, to those who came before me to say what an extraordinary police operation across all jurisdictions that I was able to listen to and witness today.

I was down at the scene early on and in our business, Carmen, myself, it's about accountability and I can't say how happy I am, how pleased I am, that the second subject was taken alive. This will really ensure accountability for the victims and their families, so congratulations to all law enforcement for a job very well done, and now the task ahead for accountability. Thank you.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We'll take questions.

REPORTER: How did the events transpire at the boat?

DAVIS: There was a call that came in to the Watertown police, three Boston police officers along with state troopers and FBI agents responded to Franklin Street. A man had gone out of his house after being inside the house all day, abiding by our request to stay inside. He walked outside and he saw blood on a boat in the backyard. He then opened the tarp on the top of the boat and he looked in and saw a man covered with blood. He retreated and called us.

We set up a perimeter around that boat and over the course of the next hour or so, we exchanged gunfire with the suspect who was inside the boat, and ultimately, the hostage rescue team of the FBI made an entry into the boat and removed the suspect who was still alive in the boat.

(CROSSTALK)

REPORTER: Can you talk about the imperative of taking him alive?

DAVIS: We always want to take all the suspects alive.

REPORTER: I understand that, sir. But can you talk about it in the context of this particular individual? Can you talk about accountability? Can you talk about why you wanted to take him?

DAVIS: We always want to take somebody alive so we can find out what happened, why it happened, and we can hold them for justice.

REPORTER: How badly -- how badly injured --

(CROSSTALK) DAVIS: The hostage rescue team actually did work in trying to negotiate him out of that boat. They did try to talk him out although from what I understand, he was not communicating.

(CROSSTALK)

REPORTER: Have they aided and abetted the suspect?

DAVIS: Actually, I don't have that information.

REPORTER: Commissioner Davis, can you talk about the suspect's injuries?

REPORTER: Are there other suspects out there? Have you got your guy? This is it?

DAVIS: I think based upon our investigation at this point in time, the citizens of the city of Boston and this area can be confident that the threat has been removed.

REPORTER: What kind of condition is the suspect in?

DAVIS: Suspect is in serious condition at the hospital.

REPORTER: How do you know these are the suspects you were looking for? They didn't rob the 7-Eleven so how did you know they were there at the same time?

DAVIS: The suspects came to our attention after a vicious assassination of a police officer at MIT and a subsequent robbery that occurred where we got videotape from a gas station. The robbery actually was a carjacking. The car was taken from the scene. Officers engaged that car from the Watertown police department along with other officers. We were then able to put the case together.

(CROSSTALK)

REPORTER: -- was the suspect shot when you were apprehending him at the boat? Was he shot by police officer?

DAVIS: The man who found him at the boat said that he was covered with blood. We assumed that those injuries occurred the evening before. There was an exchange of gunfire at the boat. I don't know if he was struck.

(CROSSTALK)

DAVIS: There was a house in New Bedford the hostage rescue team went into for the FBI because we felt it was important to the investigation but the suspect was not found there.

REPORTER: Given that he was still out there and armed --

DAVIS: I'm sorry.

REPORTER: Can you talk more about the assassination of Sean Collier? Was he shot and killed (INAUDIBLE)? What do you know about that?

DAVIS: My assessment of that particular incident is that he was assassinated in his cruiser.

REPORTER: Do you know what he was doing there?

DAVIS: He was responding to a call for a disturbance.

REPORTER: Given that he was out there, still armed, was it a mistake to give the all-clear, let people go outside? Could they have been at risk?

DAVIS: We certainly did not give an all-clear. We made it clear that people and Colonel Alben is here and spoke eloquently to this. This is a very serious and dangerous situation. We had no information that the suspect was still holed up in this particular area. He managed to elude us by being just slightly outside of the perimeter that we set up.

But in truth, we told everybody that this was a dangerous situation and they should be cautious. This is a very dangerous time in the world. We have to use caution. That's what we asked people to do.

Thankfully, this man who found the suspect called us right away, did the right thing, got on 911. We were able to come in and take care of the situation.

REPORTER: Did he have explosives with him when he was captured?

DAVIS: There's no report of explosives with him at capture but I got to tell you, I was at the scene last night just after this incident occurred. There was an exchange of over 200 rounds of gunfire. There were improvised explosive devices and hand-made hand grenades thrown at officers at the scene. This is the stuff in an urban police department, it's almost unheard of.

So these officers acted heroically, courageously. They protected the community. And they protected the -- each other when they responded to this scene. I'm so proud of the actions of the Watertown Police, state police, Boston Police. It's been an incredible team.

(CROSSTALK)

REPORTER: Did he have a weapon --

DAVIS: He did. You know what, I can't say -- I was told that there was an exchange of gunfire. I was not there when he was taken out of the boat.

REPORTER: No Miranda warning made public (INAUDIBLE). Could you explain that for us?

DAVIS: Actually, the United States attorney may -- the FBI may want to explain that. It's a federal issue.

REPORTER: Had the boat been searched earlier --

ORTIZ: Just a minute. We're going for the question.

DAVIS: No, it did not.

ORTIZ: What was the question?

REPORTER: There was no Miranda warning given, they were claiming a public safety exception. Could we get an explanation?

ORTIZ: There is a public safety exemption in cases of national security and potential charges involving acts of terrorism. And so, the government has the opportunity right now, though I believe that the suspect has been taken to a hospital. We'll start there. Thank you.

Yes? I'm sorry --

REPORTER: Will you seek the federal death penalty?

ORTIZ: You know, what I indicated earlier is that this is still an active, an ongoing investigation. We're going to be reviewing all of the evidence before that kind of a decision is made in terms of whether or not to seek the death penalty, you review all of the evidence, and it's a very thoughtful, long process that is engaged. And it's the attorney general of the Department of Justice that makes that final decision.

REPORTER: Commissioner --

(CROSSTALK)

ORTIZ: I'm sorry. Karen?

REPORTER: Straight to the boat and then can or the colonel talk a little about what happened when you were on the scene. Was he moving around, how did you know it was finally a chance to take him into custody?

Yes, I'm going to --

DEVEAU: We know he didn't go straight to the boat. We -- when we set up the perimeter with the best intentions with a lot of information. We found blood in the car that he abandoned, we found blood inside the house behind the perimeter. So, we had no indication that he had gotten outside of the perimeter. As we said, it was very chaotic early this morning. We had an aide, police officer, who was shot, bleeding. So there's a lot going on.

We thought we got the perimeter solid, and we pretty much did that, but we were about one block away. So -- he had to be moving a little bit after he was behind a house for a period of time that we know.

(CROSSTALK)

REPORTER: How did you know that you could take him into custody? Had he been moving around --

ALBEN: Sure. The reason we knew this is our helicopter had detected the subject in the boat. We have a -- what's called a forward looking infrared device on the helicopter. It picked up the heat signature of the individual even though he was underneath what appeared to be the shrink wrap or a cover on the boat itself and there was movement from that point on. The helicopter was able to deliver the tactical teams to the area and ultimately take him into custody.

REPORTER: Was the boat searched during the day on the perimeter?

ALBEN: Yes, it was outside the perimeter during the day. It was not searched. This was the act of a citizen who went out and discovered this individual in the boat and ultimately called the Watertown Police Department and resulted in this -- our response.

REPORTER: What were the suspects doing at MIT? Were they --

(CROSSTALK)

REPORTER: Is there a chance the suspect won't make it and won't live to tell what happened?

ALBEN: I'm sorry?

REPORTER: Is there a chance the suspect won't make it?

ALBEN: I don't know. I did not see him when he was taken into custody. I know he's in serious condition, but I don't know to what extent.

(CROSSTALK)

ALBEN: I think we've taken enough questions for now. Thank you. Thank you very much.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Thank you.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Thank you.

(VIDEO CLIP PLAYS)

MORGAN: Quite extraordinary video footage. That is between the police and suspect number two, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. And that is tonight. He's now in custody. Still alive.

Listen again to this just come in. New video.

(VIDEO CLIP PLAYS)

MORGAN: We know they exchanged gunfire. We don't know how bad his injuries are. He's gone to hospital tonight. And we'll have to hope that he is OK because then he can face trial. That's what most Americans I think would want him to do tonight.

Let's go to Jessica Yellin, chief White House correspondent, because the president is about to make a statement -- Jessica.

JESSICA YELLIN, CNN CHIEF WHITE HOUSE CORRESPONDENT: That's right. Hi. President Obama I'm told by sources here was in the residence tonight watching television reports of the pursuit and that all the developments in Watertown as we were, and he saw this go down just as we did. As soon as it was happening, he went over to the Oval Office to get the latest updates from his staff.

And then, FBI Director Robert Mueller called him to officially let him know that the suspect had been captured alive. And he decided to come out and make a statement, I'm told by staff, and they brought in a local news from Boston throughout the day so they could monitor actually some of the events all day long. They were riveted to the television just as we were.

So the president updated throughout the day, and he is here back at work and ready to come in, brief the nation on a -- an exciting end and a -- you know, successful law enforcement conclusion to all of this and the beginning of even more further investigation, Piers. We're waiting for him any moment.

MORGAN: Yes, before the president speaks, important to remind everybody again that as they've made this capture tonight of the victims in the last week, 8-year-old Martin Richard, 29-year-old Krystle Campbell, Lu Lingzi from China. She's just 23.

More than 183 others were injured in the marathon bombing, 58 remain in the hospital, three of them in critical condition. Many, of course, lost their limbs.

Last night, the MIT officer, Sean Collier, just 26 years old, he was killed. And 15 other Boston and Massachusetts policemen who were injured in last night's gun battle. A deadly, deadly, awful toll. And tonight, the satisfaction for the people in that area and for Boston and for America, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the bomber in custody and he is alive at the moment. We don't know the extent of his injuries. We'll try to find out more.

Fran Townsend, I believe you're with us now, national security correspondent for CNN.

In terms of the fact that this has happened within four days, Fran, this has to be considered a big success for the FBI.

FRAN TOWNSEND, CNN NATIONAL SECURITY ANALYST: Absolutely. It's a tremendous success.

And I think what you heard at that press conference is them saying it was actually -- it's a team success. You really -- you needed the Watertown Police and the Boston Police, no one agency could have done it on their own.

But the FBI gets tremendous credit. Look, they're going to have to answer real questions, though. Today we're very happy that this has been brought to the conclusion. But they're going to have answer questions. A foreign government, I suspect the Russian government, gave them a lead two years ago to go and talk to the older suspect who had died, he was killed yesterday. And they did, and then they didn't -- decided not to pursue it. And I expect, Piers, that those are going to be questions that the FBI and Director Mueller will have to answer in the coming days.

MORGAN: And the president, going back to Jessica Yellin -- do we know what time the president's due to speak?

YELLIN: Was supposed to speak already 15 minutes ago. Any moment now. He was waiting for that press conference to happen first in Boston. So he should be out here within moments.

MORGAN: OK. I'll go quickly to legal brains. Jeffrey Toobin, this debate, going over the Miranda rights. You've heard what some of the authorities had to say earlier. What did you make of what they've been saying and positioning the case from the start here?

TOOBIN: Well, they're asserting that there is a public safety exception that allows them to question him and then potentially use the information -- use the statements against him.

MORGAN: Are they right?

TOOBIN: That's not at all clear. I don't think that has bad news resolved.

Now this may be a moot question because if he is so injured that he can't be questioned at all, whether he got Miranda rights or not won't really matter. But the question of whether those --

MORGAN: And I think the injuries -- to clarify, the injuries may have come from last night's gun battle. Not necessarily from what happened today.

DERSHOWITZ: They can't have it both ways. They can't announce that public safety is over -- that everybody's safe, this is over, it's behind us, but we still need a public safety exception.

The FBI's making a serious mistake by not giving him his Miranda warnings. They should give him his Miranda warnings. They should give him a lawyer.

Let's not give any excuse to be able to successfully argue that his rights were denied.

MORGAN: It's certainly an extraordinary night, conclusion to an extraordinary week in many ways. We're waiting for the president of the United States, President Obama will be speaking about this, wants to make a statement about the capture of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, following of course the death of his brother yesterday.

This brings to conclusion the FBI investigation to hunt down the Boston marathon bombers. And they've done it in four days. And although they may well be further investigating into what has happened here, the FBI spoke to one of the brothers two years ago. For now I think they can -- they could be very pleased with their operation.

Let me go now to Anderson Cooper, he's live in Boston, and we'll take things from here.

Anderson, over to you.