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CNN NEWSROOM

New Video Captured End of Manhunt; Tsarnaev Has Injuries to Throat; Bombing Suspect Had Video of Jihadist; The Case against Suspect Number Two; Bombing Suspect Has Throat Injuries; Bombing Suspect May Be Charged Today; Investigation Moving Forward; Five Snowboarders Killed In Avalanche; Helping Boston Recover

Aired April 21, 2013 - 14:00   ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


WOLF BLITZER, CNN ANCHOR: I'm Wolf Blitzer reporting live from Boston.

FREDRICKA WHITFIELD, CNN ANCHOR: And I'm Fredricka Whitfield in Atlanta.

Welcome to this special edition of the CNN NEWSROOM. Wolf?

BLITZER: We have several new developments unfolding in Boston right now. The Boston bombing investigation intensifying. Here's what we did tell you right now. Here are the latest developments.

The suspect who was captured Friday night is Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, could, could be charged by federal prosecutors as early as today right at his hospital bed. He's over at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. He's still in serious condition. A federal official says he has injuries to his throat and is unable to speak. We'll have a live report from the hospital in just a few minutes.

Our Elizabeth Cohen is standing by. But first, we want to catch you up on some of the other developments, up to date on the charges the suspected bomber may actually face, and show you some new riveting images of that intense manhunt that led to his capture. We're watching all of this unfold.

For that, let's go to CNN's Joe Johns, our crime and justice correspondent. He's working his sources in Washington.

Joe, what are officials telling you about the proceeding that could happen today in the coming hours by the suspect's bedside? This is highly extraordinary.

JOE JOHNS, CNN CRIME AND JUSTICE CORRESPONDENT: That's true, Wolf. Our sources have told us it's possible, possible we could see charges today. But there's no guarantee. We have heard as recently as yesterday that authorities were contemplating a terrorism charge, most likely something relating to use of a weapon of mass destruction.

Also, in all likelihood, some type of charge relating to use of a firearm and commission of a felony. Conspiracy certainly also possible because authorities allege that the suspect worked on this with his brother. A number of different charges all possible, and they could come as early as today, though it's not certain -- Wolf.

BLITZER: You have, Joe, some new video that's just come in of the suspect's dramatic capture Friday night. What does it exactly show?

JOHNS: Well, let's just take a look at it. This is video of a helicopter taking pictures of the boat where the suspect was found on Friday night. And as you watch this video depending on the angle we've got, you can also see, I believe, parts of the robot that came in and moved some of the tarp away. Of course, sources telling CNN that the suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev crawled out of the boat he was hiding in and surrendered to authorities after about 25 minutes of negotiations with law enforcement. And that's according to an official with knowledge of how he was taken into custody.

We did know that authorities were having some type of dialogue with the suspect as he lay in that boat. We didn't know precisely how long it lasted -- Wolf.

BLITZER: If the charges, Joe, are actually filed today in the coming hour or two or three, will the Justice Department just make an announcement? Will there be a news conference? Do we have any indication how they're going to let the American public know that charges have been filed?

JOHNS: We have been told that there's potential for a news conference, that is, of course, if the authorities go ahead and file those charges. It's not necessary for the suspect to actually be presented before a judge today, though these are extraordinary circumstances, and they could come up with any number of other provisions. So we'll just have to wait and see. And that's what law enforcement authorities are telling us -- Wolf.

BLITZER: And these are federal charges, Joe, so the attorney general, Eric Holder, he makes this decision, specific charges, when they're filed. It goes to that -- it goes to the attorney general, right?

JOHNS: Well, it certainly is likely to go to the attorney general because of the attention this case has gotten. Also, any decision as to whether to charge the defendant with a crime that is punishable by death is certainly something the attorney general of the United States would weigh in on. And that's what we're talking about, at least the potential of, for right now -- Wolf.

BLITZER: All right, Joe, we'll stay very close touch with you. I know you're working your sources over at the Justice Department and the FBI. As soon as you get word, you'll let us know. We'll go into our breaking news coverage on that front.

Joe Johns reporting from Washington.

Meanwhile, the Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, he spoke about the bombing investigation today. He said so far he has not seen any intelligence directly linking the surviving suspect and his older brother, the 26-year-old Tamerlan Tsarnaev, to any, any terrorist organization per se, but the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee says the older Tsarnaev who was killed after the shootout with police may have become seriously radicalized by Islamic extremists when he went to Russia last year.

Here's what the House Homeland Security chairman had to say today on CNN's "STATE OF THE UNION."

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

REP. MICHAEL MCCAUL (R), CHAIRMAN, HOUSE HOMELAND SECURITY COMMITTEE: There were reports that they had suicide vests on. You don't learn that overnight. I personally believe that this man received training when he was over there, and he radicalized from 2010 to the present, and then nine months after he comes back from the Chechen region, he pulls off the largest terror attack since 9/11.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

BLITZER: After a dramatic shootout with police that killed his older brother and then eluding police during an intense day-long manhunt, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is hospitalized. He's described as being in serious but stable condition.

Our senior medical correspondent Elizabeth Cohen is outside the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center where he's being treated.

Elizabeth, update our viewers on the very latest.

ELIZABETH COHEN, CNN SENIOR MEDICAL CORRESPONDENT: Right, what we know, Wolf, is a few more specifics about how he's doing. CNN has learned through its sources that he has wounds to his throat and that he is intubated and sedated.

So let me explain a little bit about what the intubated part means. What that means is that doctors have placed a tube down this throat and hooked him up to a ventilator so the ventilator is breathing for him. That does not mean that the suspect cannot breathe on his own. As a matter of fact, he very well might be able to breathe on his own.

Doctors often do this when someone has had a large loss of blood and they want to take the strain off. They want to make things easy for his body. That can lead to a quicker recovery. So they have the ventilator breathe for him. But again, he may be able to breathe on his own -- Wolf.

BLITZER: Obviously, when they say serious but stable condition, can we conclude, Elizabeth, that it's not a life-threatening situation he's in at the hospital right now?

COHEN: You know, I would never say that definitively because people do go from serious to critical. That does happen. However, we haven't heard anything that would lead us to believe that his life is on the line. We haven't heard anything -- heard anything that would make us think that something terrible is about to happen.

As a matter of fact, everything that we've heard is that they are really doing their best to keep this man alive.

BLITZER: Security, I assume, at the hospital remains very, very intense. Especially if a judge, for example, or someone from the Justice Department, federal authorities, were to come over to his bedside and let him know what was going on, as far as charges are concerned.

Describe the security situation at the hospital, Elizabeth, for us.

COHEN: Right, we've certainly seen a heavy police presence outside the entrances to the hospital. And inside, our affiliate WHDH says that he is -- the suspect is handcuffed to the bed, and that also there are two guards at his bedside. So they do not want anyone coming in there who doesn't belong there.

I mean, not only do they -- they want to protect the staff from him, but they also want to make sure that nobody hurts him because obviously there are a lot of people who would like to hurt him.

But, Wolf, I want to emphasize again here, this man is sedated, he is intubated. He is -- from what we've been told from Governor Deval Patrick, he is not able to communicate.

BLITZER: Elizabeth Cohen will stand by at the hospital and let us know if there are developments over there.

Elizabeth, thank you.

While the suspect recovers over at that medical center, here in the Boston area, the investigation is dramatically heating up. We're going to find out how prosecutors plan to make a case against the Boston bombing suspect.

Plus, another community dealing with tragedy today. Victims of that deadly plant explosion in West, Texas. They're being remembered today at church services.

Lots of news happening today right here on CNN.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

BLITZER: Welcome back to our continuing coverage. I'm Wolf Blitzer reporting live here in Boston. CNN can now exclusively reveal the alleged Boston bomber Tamerlan Tsarnaev had video of a well-known jihadist on his up YouTube channel. The video is of an individual named Abu Dujana who is himself killed by Russian forces last December, only a few months ago. He died in the capital of Dagestan, that's in Russia, where Tamerlan's father currently lives, and where Tamerlan spent at least six months last year.

CNN cannot confirm that Tamerlan and Abu Dujana actually met in Dagestan. The video, though, had been deleted from Tamerlan's YouTube account, but was tracked down by CNN.

These are important developments we're trying to learn as much about both of these suspects as we possibly can.

Let's go live to Dagestan right now. CNN's Nick Paton Walsh is in the -- in the town there. It's near Chechnya. Nick, you've heard from a rebel Chechen group in the area about these two bombing suspects, one dead, the older brother. The other very much still alive over at a hospital here in Boston. What is this Chechen rebel group saying?

NICK PATON WALSH, CNN INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENT: Well, the Chechen rebel group said they had nothing to do with it. This is the emirate of the Caucuses, the brotherhood that kind of links many of the Islamist group in the particular areas. But to go back to what you were saying, Wolf, let me talk you through what we know about the link between Tamerlan Tsarnaev and this militant here, Abu Dujana, who died in a very heavy firefight with Russian special forces not far at all from where I'm actually standing here last December.

And now Tamerlan Tsarnaev had a YouTube account on which he posted links to various videos. One was under a (INAUDIBLE) called terrorists and it linked to this man Abu Dujana. It was deleted. But we've since tracked it down, and I can play you now some of that video showing this man, Abu Dujana, who also appeared to be a nickname for a man known as Gadzhimurad Dolgatov. He was killed not far from where I'm standing, I say, in December in a firefight with Russian special forces.

They brought in an armored personnel carrier, in fact, to carry out that attack with exception violence, witnesses account. And in there video we've also seen shown to be an extreme firefight. Typical I think for many of the clashes between militants in this region and the police.

What does it have to do to Boston? Well, as I say, there was a link from this YouTube account to this video, which we know established. What we cannot say, as you say, is if Tamerlan Tsarnaev and this Mr. Dolgatov, now deceased, ever met at all. But Mr. Tsarnaev's parents, his father, live in Makhachkala, and he was himself here only last year for at least a month according to witnesses there.

So there is apparently now the first connection, it seems, between the alleged Boston bomber suspect (INAUDIBLE) Tsarnaev and potential extremist groups here in (INAUDIBLE). No suggestion these two men met, but for some reason, Mr. Tsarnaev posted a link to a video of this man on his YouTube account -- Wolf.

BLITZER: Because, you know, Nick, there is deep concern among federal and state, local law enforcement that when this older brother who is now dead, when he spent more than six months in Dagestan where you are right now, he was potentially, this is the theory they're working on, he was trained on how to build a bomb, how to deal with these kinds of explosive devices. And he was indoctrinated, if you will, to become an extremist.

That's the concern that they're investigating. What are you hearing on the scene for us about what do we know, specifically, about what he did when he was in Dagestan last year?

WALSH: Still very unclear. We know he came to Russia in January of last year and he left by July. We don't know where he was within Russia or if he went somewhere else and then went back into Russia at a later date. I do know from a shopkeeper who lived opposite his father's apartment. He was there for about a month she said in summer. She remembered seeing him there in short boots, often worn as part of the wealth. So some suggestions he was certainly in Dagestan for a period of time, and most importantly, a lack of clarity about what he did the entire six-month period inside of Russia.

Now separate from that is the Dolgatov incident, very close to where I'm standing, a house -- an apartment and apartment block lying frankly in ruins, very heavy firefight. Suggesting these men were heavily armed. As you point out, across this region, there is militancy, they would have had the capacity to engage in almost amateur in many ways, building techniques some sort of low-level of training. We do not know (INAUDIBLE) at this point if Mr. Tsarnaev was linked at all, if he met any of the men noted in Dolgatov's crew who were killed in that extensive firefight, but we have established this link through Mr. Tsarnaev's YouTube account. That link having been deleted at some point. Certainly questions stemming from that -- Wolf.

BLITZER: All right, Nick, we'll stay in close touch with you. I know you're working your sources there in the capital of Dagestan, that's part of Russia.

Nick Paton Walsh on the scene for us.

A Justice Department official has told CNN that the surviving Boston marathon suspect may, may be charged as early as today. Investigators did not read him his Miranda rights when he was captured. They invoked what they call the public safety exception. It permits law enforcement officials to interrogate a suspect and use that information as direct evidence in court, and that is causing some controversy out there.

Let's talk about that. We'll talk about that in a few moments. Also want to talk about some other issues. Joining us now the former U.S. attorney, Doug Jones. He led the prosecutor against Eric Rudolph, the 1996 Atlanta Olympic bomber.

Doug, thanks very much for joining us. First of all, let's talk about this video. This video that has now surfaced that CNN has confirmed, a well-known jihadist in Dagestan who himself was killed in December, the video was posted on Tamerlan Tsarnaev's YouTube channel. Since then, it's been deleted.

What does that say, if you're a U.S. attorney, you're investigating this case, what does that say to you?

DOUGLAS JONES, FORMER U.S. ATTORNEY: Well, Wolf, I think it could be one of two things. There obviously could be some contact since he traveled over that way. There could have been some contact. There could have been some training, meeting people, or whatever. On the other hand, it simply could be another YouTube video that a young man has downloaded much like you download, you know, jokes and other things of interest. The problem that you've got with terrorists and hate groups today is that they can post these videos and try to not have people come and make a direct connection. But try to influence people indirectly, to create the so-called lone wolves that are out there. So it's very possible that this man saw that, was influenced by it, deleted it off his computer so as to not make any kind of link whatsoever. So it could be either way.

BLITZER: And what if there's a pattern of other jihadist type videos that have been posted to his YouTube channel that he was going through? Does that -- if there's a pattern, if you will, if there are a bunch of these kinds of jihadist videos on there, would that make a difference?

JONES: It could. Again, it depends on who it is. For instance, he may have videos posted from other jihadist groups. That would suggest not a contact, not a direct link, but someone who is sympathetic to the cause and someone who wants to download and is being influenced by that. I think we're a long way from being able to determine whether or not there was a direct link or whether or not this is just a young man disillusioned with the United States, disillusioned with this friends and has all of a sudden become sympathetic to the jihadist cause and is trying to learn more and more and is influenced more and more.

BLITZER: All right, Doug, I want you to stand by. I want to continue this conversation with you because this is a dramatic moment right now.

CNN once again, we are confirming that this well-known jihadist, an individual named as Abu Dujana, that a video that he had prepared, the older brother who is now dead, the older suspect, had posted this video on this YouTube channel since then it had been deleted. We're going to continue the conversation with Doug Jones, the former U.S. attorney, on what's going on.

Stay with us. Our special coverage live here in Boston continues right after this.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

BLITZER: We're back here. I'm Wolf Blitzer reporting live from Boston. Joining us once again, the former U.S. attorney Doug Jones.

Doug, if in the next hour or two or three they file charges, they go to the bedside of this 19-year-old suspect over at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center here in Boston, walk us through how this -- how this would unfold, assuming that this 19-year-old can't even speak right now, and he's described as being in pretty serious condition right now.

JONES: Well, Wolf, I think there's a lot of confusion about the terminology here. If they file charges in federal court, it literally under these circumstances only means they have received an arrest warrant. They have gone to a magistrate, had probable cause issue saying we're holding this guy and had a formal arrest warrant issued for him which can be executed regardless. And in fact it's already is a matter of just paperwork because he is in custody already.

But once that happens, then there is a provision that requires the defendant to be transported or appear before a magistrate forthwith. Now -- that first appearance, the initial appearance, is really for issues of the right to a lawyer, getting him counsel, issues of bond, and you can assume that the Justice Department will ask for detention. Formal charges can only be filed by a grand jury sitting in Boston. And that's probably a good ways down the road because the grand jury will be used in a number of other contexts.

So I don't think that we're going to see an awful lot happening at his bed side anytime soon because he is just not capable of meaningfully participating in any proceeding.

BLITZER: So the appearance at that hospital of a magistrate or a judge, you believe that's unlikely? Not necessary? Is that what you're saying?

JONES: I think it's unnecessary right now. You know, he was taken into custody, likely without a warrant, given the fast developments on how this manhunt transpired. He was probably taken into custody without a warrant. In order to hold him in custody, they have to get a formal arrest warrant. Once that happens, then it triggers the court proceedings to follow. But in order for there to be a court proceeding and anything involving a judge or a magistrate, the defendant has to be in a position to participate.

Now he can participate through counsel while he's still intubated, but if he's heavily sedated, the procedures are meaningless and so they will wait until it is a meaningful procedure in order to do something.

BLITZER: And what about the whole issue of advising him of his Miranda rights as he lies in this hospital bed? Walk us through this whole -- it's a sensitive issue, obviously, and apparently federal authorities, including the U.S. attorney here in Massachusetts, have decided at least for now they are not going to advice him of his Miranda rights, meaning his right to remain silent and his right to have an attorney.

JONES: Well, Wolf, it may be a moot point. I think this was all started initially right after he was placed into custody. Comments were made obviously from people who did not know his physical condition. If the -- the exception, the public safety exception was invoked, they could in fact advice him or talk to him, try to illicit whatever information they can. There is that exception.

However, apparently, he has been in such physical condition that it's a moot point. And if they have to institute criminal procedures, then the right to counsel is going to -- you know, it's going to come into play regardless. So it may be all a moot point given this guy's physical condition and his inability to communicate and speak at all.

I think we -- I think everybody jumped the gun a little bit with that, not really knowing that the guy can't -- he just can't talk at this point. So it's truly going to be a moot point, I believe. BLITZER: All right, Doug, if you don't mind, I'm going to have you stand by because there are other really important legal issues that have become the source of some controversy right now.

Doug Jones, the former U.S. attorney, he'll continue to help us better appreciate what's going on.

Investigators have a lot of questions for this Boston bombing suspect, the 19-year-old. They can't talk to him, at least not yet. He's recovering in the hospital. He's got tubes all over his body right now. He can't speak, but the feds could charge him as we have been reporting, even as he lies in his hospital bed.

Stay right here. More of our continuing coverage from Boston right after this.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

WOLF BLITZER, CNN ANCHOR: I'm Wolf Blitzer reporting live in Boston. CNN can now exclusively reveal the alleged Boston bomber Tamerlan Tsarnaev had video of a well known jihadist on his YouTube Channel.

We have been watching this. The video is of a man named Abu Dijana. He was himself killed by Russian forces last December. He died at the capital of Dagestan. That's where Tamerlan's father currently lives and where Tamerlan who is now dead spent at least six months last year in 2012.

CNN cannot confirm that Tamerlan and Abu Dijana actually met in Dagestan. We do know though that the video that was originally posted on his YouTube site was deleted from his YouTube account, but still, we have managed to track it down here at CNN.

Here's the latest information on his younger brother, the surviving Boston bombing suspect, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the 19-year-old. He remains hospitalized in what doctors say is serious but stable condition.

And a federal official tells us he has injuries to his throat. He's intubated and is sedated. He can't speak, obviously, despite his condition, Tsarnaev could be formally charged as early as today. We're standing by for an announcement from the Justice Department.

A law enforcement source saying a judge or a magistrate will likely come to the hospital, could come to the hospital, bedside, to formally present the charges to the 19-year-old suspect. A Justice Department official says the suspect will likely face federal terrorism charges, possibly state murder charges as well and could be formally arraigned later.

I want to bring in Tom Fuentes, the former FBI assistant director and CNN analyst right now. He's joining us from Washington. Tom, the suspect, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, he's sedated in the hospital.

He's the only person right now who knows why any of this occurred. But if they can't question him yet, what are they focusing on the investigation? Walk us through a little bit about what's going on behind the scenes.

TOM FUENTES, CNN ANALYST: Well, they're doing what they would have been doing even if he could talk. That is going through every possible e-mail, telephone conversation, well they can't get the conversation, but at least who he contacted or received calls for.

Going to every person identified to interview them about what they know about him and his intentions, if possible. Interviewing all of the former classmates and teachers and neighbors and relatives, and although as you heard this week, most of them have nothing but glowing accounts of how great a kid he was.

So they'll probably hear much of that again, but they will go through trying to really identify everybody he's been in contact with for as far back as they can go.

BLITZER: You know, a lot of questions have been raised. The Russians, they did inform the U.S. a couple years ago that the older brother, who is now deceased, the older brother seemed to have been developing some ties with extremists.

The FBI questioned him, questioned members of the family here in the United States. Determined there was nothing really of substance they could go on, but this is becoming a hot issue right now.

I guess the bottom line question and your former FBI assistant director, the fear is did the FBI miss what could have been a critical red flag that could have prevented this Boston marathon bombing?

FUENTES: Well, of course, Wolf, there's always a possibility that something was missed. But they're going to be able to go back and analyze completely what was the request? How much information was actually furnished by the Russian authorities to the FBI?

So what did the FBI have to go on when they conducted this investigation of him? And so far, the accounts are that they did all of the logical investigation they could do based on what they were given at that time and could find no indication that he was linked to a terrorist organization or in contact with one from here or with other terrorists here in the United States.

And after they conducted that investigation, they didn't just drop it and leave it at that. They went back and requested more information, and didn't receive any additional information that would provide a reason and a legal justification to maintain the investigation and keep that file open.

BLITZER: I'm sure they're doing a complete post-mortem to learn lessons from what happened. I assume that's going on right now. They're reviewing all of the interviews that they conducted with Tamerlan Tsarnaev, the 26-year-old who is now dead. Members of his family, and information, they're doing a complete analysis, right?.

FUENTES: That's correct. They'll try to find out everything that came into the FBI at that time and since, what the FBI did with it, how far they took it, and whether based on what the FBI knew at that time, was the FBI legally justified in being able to maintain the file.

And even if they wanted to, it would have required more information from the Russian authorities, what did they have to lead them to believe that he was linked to a terrorist organization there? You know, when he was back and this often happens, people are back visiting family, supposedly, he spent the six months with his father.

That doesn't mean that he wasn't in contact with the terrorist organization. But the other thing that the FBI has to do because tens of thousands of these type of requests come in all year from all over the world and I mean, literally, tens of thousands, is they have to triage it.

This is somebody who went back to a region and from the Russian perspective, he may be linked up with a terrorist organization there, or he may be looking at videos on YouTube or websites that talk about Chechen terrorists who later apparently was killed by the Russian authorities.

It's clear that the Chechen terrorist organizations have been fighting a war with the Russian federation since the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991 and specifically since 1994, but I can't recall a time when they actually trained and deployed somebody to come to the U.S. to conduct an attack here.

We just haven't had that. So you would triage based on was he going back to an area which is a hotbed of terrorism, of people who have sent people to the United States to commit an act or have attacked the U.S. embassy or consulate overseas? But in this case, none of those organizations have directly come after the United States.

BLITZER: And I want to continue this conversation, Tom, don't go too far away. We're going to take a quick break, but there are other questions, including where Chechen terrorists have shown up, including in Iraq, where there have been many reports of Chechen terrorists assisting other al Qaeda elements in killing American troops.

Afghanistan, elsewhere, I want to pursue this because I know when you worked at the FBI, you dealt with international organizations, criminal organizations and other governments. And the other question, how good is the cooperation right now between the U.S. and Russia in determining whether or not he was trained to build a bomb during those six months when he was in Dagestan?

What do the Russian authorities know, and how much of that information would they share with the U.S.? All right, stand by, lots of unanswered questions. We're also awaiting word whether charges will be formally filed. There's other news we're following as well including in Colorado, a horrible, horrible snowboard death as a result of a deadly avalanche. Much more coming up. Stay with us.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

BLITZER: Let's bring back Tom Fuentes, the former FBI assistant director, a CNN analyst right now. How much help should the U.S. expect from Russia now in trying to determine what the older brother, Tamerlan Tsarnaev did during those six months last year when he was in Dagestan, which is part of Russia? Because as you know, there is deep concern that it was during that period potentially he may have learned how to build bombs.

FUENTES: Wolf, during the past, the Russians have never allowed the FBI to specifically go to areas like Dagestan or Chechnya to do investigation, even side by side with the FSB, their FBI counterpart.

The request will go into the Russians, we'll ask again for additional information, and probably will get some additional information, whatever they have based on the worldwide interest in this story now.

But they will be doing the investigation, and I'm almost positive, I would be shocked if the FBI is allowed to actually to even go there and be present with them when they follow up and do the additional work they would do in that region.

BLITZER: So the level of cooperation is limited. Yet they did tell the FBI about this 26-year-old now deceased suspect and the FBI began an investigation of its own. Why would the Russians, if their cooperation with the U.S. is so limited, why would they initially tip off the U.S. about this guy?

FUENTES: Well, they send a lot of requests, as do many countries in the world to the FBI to say we're suspicious of a given individual, here's what we have, please look into it. They did look into it, from our understanding.

We have to look into it, how much nuance was in the quest, how much detail was in it when the FBI sent more results to them and requested more information, when they got no additional information. They have no choice but to close the matter.

This happens the other way around. We receive tens of thousands of requests from around the world who are investigators from other countries to come to the United States and conduct investigation. Come to the United States and knock on people's doors here.

And you know, we're not going to allow that to happen. So this works both ways. And I wouldn't call it limited. I would just say that the investigation depends on the person and the fact pattern, the level of the case, the level of interest on their part and our part.

And a number of factors determine the degree of cooperation, but that's often on a case by case basis, not just across the board that we're going to pull out the stops every time someone sends a note to Washington.

BLITZER: Tom Fuentes is going to stay around and help us throughout this afternoon as we continue to await word on potential charges that could be filed against the 19-year-old suspect over here at the hospital. Tom, thanks very much.

We're following the latest developments here in Boston. But let's check in with some other news that we're following as well. Fredricka Whitfield is at the CNN Center joining us with some of these other stories making headlines right now.

Hi, Fred. What's going on?

FREDRICKA WHITFIELD, CNN ANCHOR: Hello again, Wolf. In Colorado, tragic incident, five snowboarders are dead in the state's deadliest avalanche in more than 50 years. It happened yesterday at Loveland Pass, elevation 12,000 feet.

Our Nick Valencia is here with details on this. So Nick, we're talking about five deaths, but there is a survivor in all of this.

NICK VALENCIA, CNN CORRESPONDENT: There is. It's a remarkable story for him, and appears from all outward appearances these are very experienced snowboarders. They were wearing avalanche beacons all of the proper equipment, but the story of the survivor is a remarkable story.

The sheriff I spoke to last night said it was a critical move by him for flagging down the Colorado Department of Transportation. They believe if he didn't do that, they would still be looking for this group of individuals. They were in an area in Loveland Pass, behind a valley. It would have been difficult to spot them from the roadway.

WHITFIELD: This is a national park. They were not at a resort area. They were really freefalling, sort of, snowboarding, doing their own thing. They had all the right equipment. Five of them got trapped and he made his way about 200 yards away and flagged somebody down. Were they able to recover the bodies? Was he able to take them to the area?

VALENCIA: They were, with the help of this lone survivor. We've learned his identity, we haven't been given permission by the family to release his identity yet, but we know this is a popular area for snowboarders and skiers. Listen, even in the back country, even for the most experienced snowboarder or skier, it's unpredictable.

That's why it's part of the attraction to go there. As you mentioned, the deadliest avalanche in the last 50 years in Colorado. This brings the toll now for Colorado's avalanche season up to 11 dead.

WHITFIELD: Wow, incredible numbers. All right, thanks so much Nick Valencia for bringing that to us. Appreciate it.

All right, millions of us watch tragedy unfold last week on the streets of Boston and wondered, what can I do to help? We're about to tell you. Wolf and I will be talking to the Massachusetts attorney general about how you can help the victims of the bombing taking place at the Boston marathon.

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BLITZER: Wolf Blitzer reporting live in Boston. Fredricka Whitfield is monitoring developments at the CNN Center in Atlanta. A lot of people have been wondering how they can help the victims and their families. The Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick and Boston's mayor, Tom Menino, they have formed what is called "The One Fund" Boston charity, the purpose is to raise money to help those families most affected by these Boston marathon bombings.

Martha Coakley is Massachusetts' attorney general. She is here with us here in Boston right now. Attorney General, thanks very much for coming in.

And I want and I know Fred does as well. We want to get to ways people who are out here watching us in the United States and around the world might be able to help. But let's talk about your role, Massachusetts.

If the federal government files charges, terrorism charges, murder charges, whatever, against this 19-year-old suspect, what about Massachusetts? Will you file separate charges as well?

MARTHA COAKLEY (D), MASSACHUSETTS ATTORNEY GENERAL: Well, both D.A.s and we will work cooperatively with the federal government. In an instance like this, we do the investigation together, but it's mostly most if not all of the charges would be federal. And certainly, we'll cooperate as we work, but the federal government will have the final say.

BLITZER: They'll take priority as far as the charges, the trial, or whatever is going to take place?

COAKLEY: Yes.

BLITZER: And I know you can't get into the investigation because you're afraid you're going to undermine this investigation. It's a very sensitive point right now, but are we bracing for those charges to be filed as early as today? Have you heard anything, will a magistrate actually go to the bedside at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and notify the suspect of what's going on?

COAKLEY: Well, it's possible he could be arraigned at bedside. We have done that before in Massachusetts. He will be charged obviously, just a question of when. It could be potentially as early as today, but it's more likely he will be charged while he's still in custody and also in the hospital.

BLITZER: Do you want to weigh in? I know Fred has questions and I'll let her come into the conversation as well, on the whole issue of whether he should be offered his Miranda Rights to an attorney and to remain silent?

COAKLEY: That's totally a decision for the federal government to make. They have the access to the facts of the law that apply. I trust they will make the right decision. Once he's arraigned, of course, that may be moot because he will have an attorney who is present, but I think that's a decision that I think we have to have the confidence that they will make the right call.

BLITZER: All right, let's -- Fredricka, I know you have questions as well.

WHITFIELD: Right. Well, Ms. Coakley, I'm wondering, if you have any concerns or if you're worried about the delay of being able to question this young man, whether that will in any way kind of impair the case building?

COAKLEY: I'm sorry. I didn't really hear your question, if we could do that again?

WHITFIELD: Yes, I'm wondering if you are worried at all, the delay in being able to talk to this young man, in any way, will that impair the real building of this case?

COAKLEY: I think right now because there's such a great level of cooperation between state and federal authorities, we have been working on week on this as we were Friday, both trying to apprehend the two individuals, doing the appropriate warrant, do that investigation. There has been a unified purpose in this. All that information is being secured. It will all be done cooperatively, and I don't think it will.

WHITFIELD: All right, let me ask you, I know the sirens are going by and it's very noisy there. Let me ask you also about the cooperation of trying to get donations, fund-raising, in a collective kind of place. The mayor and the governor announcing today that they've got "The One Fund Boston" at work, explain how it's going to work.

COAKLEY: It basically is pretty easy. People can give online, send checks. And one of the things we learned, we were warned by folks from Sandy Hook Connecticut was that make sure that your dollars go where they go. People should be confident it's going to the right charity, the right web site.

And so as we oversee the charities in Massachusetts, we sent out warnings not just in Massachusetts but around the world. Give to that fund if you want, but do your homework and make sure the charities aren't going to fraud. Unfortunately, we saw a cottage industry after the disasters of people who fraud for dollars.

WHITFIELD: What to look out for to identify those scams because they're very good these days, what are some of the tips you're giving to people?

COAKLEY: Well, certainly, a lot of domain names registered that we thought were potentially sketchy. So we're saying, you know, if you want to give money right now, your one safe thing is "The One Fund Boston." There will be other charities that spring up. Check with our office, check with the Better Boston Bureau to see if they're legitimate.

BLITZER: And we know that attorney general four people died, including one police officer from MIT nearly 200 were injured and at least 50 or 60 remain in the hospital, some of them in critical condition right now.

So you will have a way of distributing funds to help these individuals. Have you brought Ken Feinberg in as someone who can help? He's the one who helped the 9/11 victims and other kinds of victims. Is he working with you on this?

COAKLEY: No, no, the governor and mayor have brought in Ken Feinberg to make sure the money goes where it should go. I'm sure there will be lots of ways to distribute it, but that's the one central way to make sure because many of those victims will need help for years to come.

BLITZER: They will and we're grateful to you and the governor and mayor and everyone who contributes to the funds to help these families because God only knows what they have been through.

COAKLEY: People have been very generous on money and blood. And there will be other needs --

BLITZER: You have never seen in your career as attorney general or prosecutor, anything, like this here in Massachusetts before?

COAKLEY: We have not and we hope we don't again.

BLITZER: We hope so, too. Hope we learn a lesson so we can prevent these kinds of things down the road, although there may be no 100 percent guarantees.

COAKLEY: The one thing that is interesting is everybody worked together both on the investigation, now on the healing, people are unified to making sure that happens.

BLITZER: Martha Coakley, thanks very much for coming in.

COAKLEY: Thank you.

BLITZER: The attorney general of Massachusetts. We're going to have more on the breaking news that we're watching. The video that we now have confirmed here at CNN, a video of a well-known jihadist, a video posted on the older brother's YouTube Channel, what exactly does this mean? We're digging deeper on this.

Also, a reporter finds himself right in the middle of this story as police take down the Boston bombing suspect. We'll speak with that reporter and a lot more. Says, by the way, he's never experienced anything like this.

We'll go inside the story with a local reporter who lived it coming up in the next hour. Stay with us. Our coverage continues.

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