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WEEKEND EARLY START

Snowden Hiding in the Shadows; Some in Colorado Return to Normal; Storms Threaten Central U.S.; Obama Calls for New Sanctions on Syria; The Bleacher Report

Aired June 16, 2013 - 06:00   ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


ALISON KOSIK, CNN ANCHOR: From CNN world headquarters in Atlanta, this is EARLY START WEEKEND.

Look at this. Flash flooding in Missouri causing big problems on roads and whole neighborhoods. And it's not just Missouri.

If you're worried about your FaceBook page being hacked, wait until you hear how vulnerable your medical devices are. Pacemakers, fetal monitors all very easy targets for cyber criminals looking to hurt or even kill.

And don't call it a comeback yet. Phil Mickelson's celebrating both his birthday and Father's Day on the links, but can he keep his U.S. Open lead?

It's Sunday, June 16th. Good morning and happy Father's Day. I'm Alison Kosik.

And we begin this morning with new details on the government's controversial methods for watching American citizens. The intelligence community is trying to justify the phone and Internet records it's asked companies like Verizon and Google to keep. It sent a document to Congress, given to CNN by a congressional source, which states that records can only be searched when, quote, "reasonable suspicion" can connect a name or telephone number to a specific terrorist organization. That letter also says that phone records were searched fewer than 300 times last year and that any records kept must be destroyed after five years.

The man who leaked the existence of the NSA surveillance programs remains in hiding in one of the most densely populated cities on earth. It's believed Edward Snowden is still hold up somewhere in Hong Kong. Let's bring in CNN international correspondent Nic Robertson. He's in Hong Kong.

Nic, what is the latest on the search for Snowden?

NIC ROBERTSON, CNN SENIOR INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENT: Well, I think perhaps one of the things here -- one of the issues here is that there is no arrest warrant for him yet, there is no request for extradition yet that we're aware of. And perhaps Snowden really at the moment is really hiding from all the journalists who want to talk to him, rather than hiding from authorities. I mean what he's said is that he's willing to put his fate in the hands of the people and the courts of Hong Kong and that he has faith in the justice system here. However, he really has gone to ground. But when I was talking to a former senior police official here, he said, look, there may be 7 million people here in Hong Kong. This may be one of the densest populated cities in the world. But that is also, when it comes to looking for Snowden, that's 7 million pairs of eyes who could be out there looking for him, Alison.

KOSIK: There was a rally in support of Snowden in Hong Kong yesterday, but I'm hearing it was much smaller than organizers had hoped.

ROBERTSON: Yes, it does kind of throw into sharp focus, if Snowden is putting his faith for support in the people and the courts of Hong Kong, you know, you've got to look at this and say the people really didn't come out and show the support that perhaps he might have hoped for. If you're going to really have an influence on legislators, on the chief executive, for example, here in Hong Kong, who will make the key decisions when the time comes about arrest warrants and these sorts of things, extradition, this was not a big gathering by any stretch of the imagination, 250, 300 people, a third of them journalists. Organizers had hoped for hundreds.

But just days before, protests in the city for the Tiananmen -- anniversary of the Tiananmen Square killings, there were 50 to 150,000 people there. So a vast difference. And these protests really perhaps an indication that some people care but not that many, despite the fact that Snowden said this was one of the countries that was being -- one of the places, rather, that was being hacked, Alison.

KOSIK: What about more documents? I mean could they be leaked soon?

ROBERTSON: The indications are, and certainly intelligence officials suspect, that there could be more information coming out. He has indicated himself, Snowden has indicated, that, you know, at one stage he had access to the names and locations and assignments of CIA assets and undercover assets around the globe. He's indicated that he's had access to a huge amount of detailed information. He's also indicated that he is not out to jeopardize, he says, the national security of the United States by throwing wantonly this information out there.

But also, one of the journalists, Glenn Greenwald, who's been tracking him closely and reporting on him very closely, has indicated that we've really only seen the tip of the iceberg so far. So I think that's a general expectation. There's more to come. I mean what has he done so far? He's got all - he's got some of the details out that he wanted to get out to expose what he says he wanted to expose. Then he's given interviews to sort of justify why he's done it here in Hong Kong. His last one was on -- last interview Wednesday with the "South China Morning Post," really almost justifying why he'd come to Hong Kong. You know, pointing out that they'd been hacking here, Alison.

KOSIK: OK, Nic Robertson, thank you.

To Colorado now where firefighters say they've turned the corner on what's being called the worst wildfire in that state's history. The Black Forest Fire is 55 percent contained this morning and no more lives have been lost, but authorities say the damage that's already been done is catastrophic.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

SHERIFF TERRY MAKETA, EL PASO COUNTY, COLORADO: It looks like a nuclear bomb went off in some of those areas and you can't even recognize whether it was a house or some other kind of structure.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

KOSIK: Another large wildfire is 40 percent contained and others continue to burn across Colorado. More than 1,000 people are battling the flames. Our George Howell is in Colorado Springs.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

GEORGE HOWELL, CNN CORRESPONDENT (voice-over): The grass is still green, his home still standing, and Mike Bossert is back to his regular routine since the mandatory evacuation for this neighborhood has been lifted.

HOWELL (on camera): What's it like to be back?

MIKE BOSSERT, COLORADO SPRINGS RESIDENT: It's good to be home. Yes, it's good to be home. We were out for a couple of nights. We left during the - during the voluntary on Wednesday. And then they put a mandatory on Thursday night, which was a little - a little nerve- racking. But, you know, our boys and my wife were able to pack some things up and take things out, so we felt pretty comfortable with, you know, leaving when we did.

HOWELL (voice-over): Just down the road, it's an entirely different story for Trevor Miller, who still can't return home.

HOWELL (on camera): Yes, I see everything packed up there in the back.

TREVOR MILLER, COLORADO SPRINGS RESIDENT: Yes. Everything in the back is my brother and I's stuff. We had three other cars too that left our house and those were all packed with our family's supplies. We had about an hour to grab everything that we wanted or needed before leaving our house.

HOWELL (voice-over): Some 38,000 people were forced to evacuate earlier this week as firefighters struggled to protect property and hold the line against the wildfire. So far, more than 15,000 acres have been scorched, but firefighters have been able to gain ground. Late Friday, Mother Nature stepped in with much-needed rainfall that Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper says had a significant impact.

GOV. JOHN HICKENLOOPER, COLORADO: That rain just it dropped 10 or 15 degrees off the temperature. Plus it, you know, it's a firefighters' best friend.

HOWELL (on camera): You got wet yourself here, yes? HICKENLOOPER: Yes, I was standing right up there. You know, it's the first time -- my grandmother always said, you know, don't be -- you're too stupid to come out of the rain. I was too happy to come out of the rain.

HOWELL (voice-over): Officials announced Saturday they didn't lose any structures or lose any ground overnight, proof that firefighters are gaining the upper hand.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We want the fire to come out and fight now. We're ready, we're staffed, we're equipped. Show yourself. We'll take care of it.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

HOWELL: The firefighters out here, they are optimistic about fighting this fire, especially with all of the weather that has moved through over the weekend. But it is a mixed bag because these thunderstorms, they bring lightning, and lightning can obviously start new fires. That's a big concern. But it also brings rainfall in several different areas, heavy rainfall, and that is welcome news as firefighters keep up the fight.

Alison.

KOSIK: OK. George Howell, thanks.

To Springfield, Missouri, now, where more rain is expected today after heavy storms Saturday triggered flash flooding. This SUV, it got trapped by the rushing water. According to CNN affiliate KSPR, as much as nine inches of rain fell in just a few hours. Water rescues were reported, as well as flooded homes. KSPR reports traffic on the James River Freeway slowed to a crawl as water spilled over the road. Power was knocked out to hundreds of homes.

So, where exactly is that storm system headed and could flash floods pose a risk to your Father's Day celebrations? Let's bring in meteorologist Jennifer Delgado in the CNN Severe Weather Center.

Jennifer, what is the Sunday forecast?

JENNIFER DELGADO, AMS METEOROLOGIST: Oh, I have to tell you, Alison, we're going to continue to see more of that rain coming down through parts of the Midwest. And we still have flood watches in place across parts of Kansas, as well as into Missouri. You can see areas in green. And that means, of course, the ground is saturated. So, once again, we could continue to see themes like we just saw of flash flooding coming out of Springfield, Missouri.

And to give you an idea of how much rain you're talking, some of these areas, eight to 10 inches of rainfall came down. Of course, keep in mind, flash flooding, the number one weather-related killer. So, certainly, if you are seeing flooded roadways out there, don't go driving through those roadways. You know, save your life, as well as those first responders as well. Looking at the radar, still some rain coming down through parts of Missouri, as well as into Kansas. So that's why we had those flooding watches in place. So, some of these locations still could see potentially, we'll say, four to six inches of rainfall as we go through the next 48 hours, three to five in northern parts of Missouri. So, once again, for your Father's Day, it's going to be starting up cloudy across the Midwest and we'll also going to add in the chance for some severe storms to arrive. And some of these storms could produce some damaging winds, as well as hail, anywhere from Kansas all the way up towards areas including Nebraska.

Now the northeast, what's going to be happening there? Well, yesterday you had a nice day. And hopefully you took your father out yesterday for the sunshine and the nice weather because today we're going to start to see the clouds rolling in, as well as the rain. And that, Alison, is going to have an effect on the U.S Open in Pennsylvania today. And we're talking rain for Sunday and the same for Monday. So I imagine a lot of fathers are going to be watching the U.S Open. I know I won't, but it's not that exciting to me.

KOSIK: Speak for yourself.

DELGADO: I know. Back over to you.

KOSIK: All right. Jennifer Delgado, thanks.

North Korea is reaching out an olive branch to the U.S It's proposing high-level talks with Washington to ease tensions on the Korean peninsula. Since Kim Jong-un took power in 2011, Pyongyang has carried out several long-range rocket launches and an underground nuclear test. In April, the top U.S commander in the Pacific warned that North Korea's missile and weapons programs pose a clear and direct threat to U.S security.

Former President George W. Bush is safe at home in Dallas after an in- flight scare last night. He was on a flight from Philadelphia to his native Texas when the pilot reported smelling smoke. The flight was sent to Louisville, where it landed without incident. Bush made it back to Dallas earlier this morning.

Coming up, as the White House ramps up pressure against the Syrian regime, Russia is sending a new warning to the U.S.

And Russia's president also making headlines for a very different reason. He's accused of stealing a Super Bowl ring, of all things, from the New England Patriots. His response just ahead.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

KOSIK: Good morning, Atlanta! Look at that, a beautiful, live look outside the studio here in downtown Atlanta. Of course, we want to make sure everyone knows about CNN's newest program, "New Day," launching tomorrow morning on CNN beginning at 6:00 a.m. Very exciting. I can't wait to get a look at it.

Iran has a new president. Hassan Rohani won more than 50 percent of the vote in Friday's presidential election. The 65-year-old moderate cleric has promised to improve Iran's wilting economy and reduce unemployment, which topped 15 percent. In what could be a key overture to the west, he also promised to reduce international tensions over Iran's controversial nuclear program. The White House says it remains ready to engage with the Iranian government directly.

It was a violent night in Istanbul, turkey. Turkish security forces stormed Gezi Park using water cannons and tear gas to force anti- government protesters out of the park and into side streets. And after hours of fighting, we see this, Gezi Park completely clear and clean. Turkish Prime Minister Erdogan says he plans a counterdemonstration today after the anti-government message that was sparked over the past two weeks.

Russia is warning the U.S. enforcing a no-fly zone over Syria in an attempt to help rebel forces could violate international law, but the White House has not decided on establishing a no-fly zone, an idea thrown out there by some Republicans. President Obama's deputy national security adviser says the fighting between rebel forces and the Assad regime is so intermingled it's not a problem that can be solved from the air.

This comes as Obama is ramping up pressure on the Syrian regime. It's pushing for tighter sanctions against Bashar al Assad's government. The atrocities in Syria are mounting. The U.N. says an average of 5,000 people die in civil war each month.

And this past week, the White House accused Syria of using chemical weapons against its people. Now the U.S will help rebel forces, likely in the form of arms and ammunition. CNN's Frederik Pleitgen is in Damascus, Syria's capital.

Fred, now Egypt is turning its back on Syria, too?

FREDERIK PLEITGEN, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Good morning, Alison.

Yes, this is another blow to the Syrian government now that the Egyptians have said that they are severing ties with Damascus. They're forcing the Syrians to close their embassy in Cairo. The Egyptian government was always seen as something like a possible mediator between the government and the rebels, but, of course, now that's gone away.

The mood here in Damascus on the streets, among the people who support the government, is one of defiance. They say that if America wants to get involved in this war, let them come. But, of course, they are very worried about the possible scale and scope of American intervention here in this war and they're really waiting to see what's going to happen.

One of the things that has bolstered them is the fact that the Russians are saying they're unconvinced by the evidence of possible chemical weapons used here on the battlefield and they say, the Russians say, that any weapons deliveries to the rebels would thwart any sort of peace process that might take place, Alison.

KOSIK: OK, Frederik Pleitgen in Damascus. Thank you.

Russian President Vladimir Putin may be one of the most powerful men on the planet, but he's accused of pocketing a $25,000 Super Bowl ring. Next, who accuses Putin of stealing his ring?

But first, as you plan your summer travel, there are clearly some places that are more expensive to visit than others and some that are a downright bargain. According to Trip Advisor, Chicago, San Francisco, Boston and New York are among the most expensive U.S cities to visit. Honolulu tops the list. As for international cities, there's New York again, right behind Paris. Oslo, Norway, is actually one of the most expensive.

Now, for cheaper international cities -- Budapest and Hanoi are on the list, but it's Sofia, Bulgaria, that's the cheapest international city. And for the top five least expensive U.S cities, Portland, right here in Atlanta, too, Dallas, Miami. And the number one least expensive city to visit, Las Vegas in Nevada. That's some news for all you road warriors out there. We're coming right back.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

KOSIK: Russian President Vladimir Putin is accused of stealing one of the most prized possessions in America. Patriot's owner Robert Kraft says Putin stole his diamond-encrusted Super Bowl ring during a 2005 meeting in Russia. That's according to a report in "The New York Post." Kraft says he tried to get the White House to intervene but was told it was better to say it was a gift in the interest of U.S/Russian relations. A Putin spokesman maintains the ring was indeed a gift. Hmm.

A familiar face has the lead heading into today's final round at the U.S Open. Andy Scholes joins us now for more in the "Bleacher Report."

Good morning.

ANDY SCHOLES, BLEACHER REPORT: Hey, good morning, Alison.

Well, no one knows more about the drama during the final round of the U.S Open than Phil Mickelson. He's never won the event, finishing second a record five times. But today Mickelson looking to finally get over that hump. The course at Merion Golf Club has wreaked havoc on most of the field, but not Mickelson. He has had at least a share of the lead after every round so far. Mickelson's the only golfer under par through the first three rounds of play. He's at one under. Three golfers are one shot back.

And Tiger Woods is not one of them. Tiger had a rough third round, shooting six over par. He's now nine over for the tournament. The final round of the tournament kicks off later this morning. Mickelson tees off at 3:20 Eastern this afternoon.

Well, what would a Bruins/Blackhawks Stanley Cup finals game be without overtime? Last night was game two of the series and they would, once again, need extra time to settle it. Tied at one in overtime. Daniel Paille comes through with the game-winner. Bruins take game two 2-1 to even the series at a game apiece. Game three of the Stanley Cup finals is Monday night in Boston.

Well, scary moment last night in the Royals/Rays game. In the fifth inning, Eric Hosmer's going to hit this pitch right back at Alex Cobb. It's going to strike him in the head near his right ear. And Cobb was taken out on a stretcher but did remain conscious the entire time on the way to the hospital. The Rays announce that all tests were normal and Cobb was diagnosed with a concussion. Now, from the hospital, Cobb tweeted, "can't thank everyone enough for the prayers. It was the only way for me to make it out of there OK. Look forward to getting back out there."

Now, definitely a scary moment, but --

KOSIK: Oh, my gosh, so crazy!

SCHOLES: Yes, good to see that he was well enough to get his phone out and do a little action on Twitter and tweet that he is OK and let everyone know.

KOSIK: Nice. He's got a hard noggin there.

SCHOLES: Yes. Right. Good thing to have a hard head in that situation.

KOSIK: All right, Andy Scholes, thank you.

Flash floods are the number one weather related killer in the U.S. and we're going to take you to the Midwest and the latest danger zone.

And if losing control of your bank accounts and online profiles weren't frightening enough, some life-saving medical devices, like pacemakers, are vulnerable to hacking. Full story ahead.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

KOSIK: Now for an update on mortgages. Rates climbed higher again this week. Look at this.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

KOSIK: Welcome back and thanks for starting your morning with us. And a special welcome to our troops watching on the American Forces Network. I'm Alison Kosik. It's half past the hour.

The intelligence community is trying to justify its surveillance of American citizens, sending a letter to Congress providing some details about its search of phone records. That letter said in part that searches must involve, quote, "reasonable suspicion" about a connection to a terror group, that telephone records were searched fewer than 300 times last year, and that all phone and Internet records must be destroyed after five years. The letter was given to CNN by a congressional source.

It was a violent night in Istanbul, Turkey. Turkish security forces stormed Gezi Park using water cannons and tear gas to force anti- government protesters out of the park and into side streets. And after hours of fighting, we see this, Gezi park completely clear and clean. Turkish Prime Minister Erdogan says he plans a counterdemonstration today after the anti-government message that was sparked over the past two weeks.

Three people were dead and two are critically injured in Nebraska after five violent shootings rocked southern Omaha, all within an hour. Among the dead, the suspect killed in a gun battle with police. Officials are now investigating if the shootings are related.

In Colorado, firefighters say heavy rain has helped them get a handle on the worst wildfire in that state's history. The Black Forest Fire is now 55 percent contained. Fifteen thousand acres have already burned. Two people have died. And authorities say the damage is catastrophic. Another large wildfire is 40 percent contained and others continue to burn.

Across Colorado, more than 1,000 people are battling the flames.

To Springfield, Missouri, where more rain is expected today after heavy storms Saturday triggered flash flooding. This SUV got trapped by the rushing water. According to CNN affiliate KSPR, as many as nine inches of rain fell in just a few hours. Water rescues and flooded homes were reported. KSPR reports traffic on the James River freeway slowed to a crawl as water spilled over the roads. Power was knocked out to hundreds of homes.

Forget your Twitter account. According to a new security warning, hackers could actually target important medical devices, implanted ones, like pacemakers, even hospital monitoring stations. CNN's Brian Todd has more.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

BRIAN TODD, CNN CORRESPONDENT: A cyber security firm has found major vulnerabilities that would allow hackers access to pacemakers, anesthesia devices, monitoring stations and other life-sustaining medical equipment, a threat so real, the FDA is taking action. It's the story line in a harrowing scene in the Showtime series "Homeland." terrorists send a signal to a pacemaker, an attempt to take down America's vice president.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Call the doctor.

(END VDIEO CLIP)

TODD: But it's not just the stuff of fiction. Stuart McClure of the firm Cylance shows another device, an insulin pump that could easily be compromised.

STUART MCCLURE, CYLANCE INC.: All you need is a simple little antenna, something like a 900-megahertz antenna that you plug into your laptop, and you develop a little program to connect to this wirelessly over radio, and then you can take over the actual system itself, increase the maximum bulles (ph), which is the maximum amount of insulin that can be dispensed, and then dispense that particular insulin to the patient. And that's how dangerous this stuff can be and how very, very real world it is.

TODD: McClure once demonstrated the technique on an industrial pump, over-pressurizing it remotely.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Unit, OK, I got that.

TODD: This is a wireless defibrillator and McClure says wireless devices can also be hacked. McClure and his team have just told the FDA what they have done and the FDA has just put out the word to manufacturers -- tighten the safety standards of all of these gadgets, from fetal monitors to defibrillators like this one. Make sure that your antivirus software and firewalls are up to date. Use biometrics and sophisticated smart cards. Make those passwords tougher to figure out.

The FDA says, so far, it's not aware of any patient injuries or deaths from the hacking of medical equipment. But McClure says almost everything's wide open. Pacemakers and other cardiac equipment can be slowed or disabled, monitors could shut off. At Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston a few years ago, a glitch, not a hack, slowed down fetal monitors for women with high-risk pregnancies. The computer systems for these devices are interconnected, wide open and widespread.

DR. JOHN HALAMKA, BETH ISRAEL DEACONNESS MEDICAL CENTER: On an average day, Beth Israel Deaconess has 15,000 devices connected to its network, things you wouldn't normally think of as being connected to a network, like a monitor or an IV pump today are smart.

TODD: Dr. John Halamka says his hospital does firewall off its systems to prevent hacking, but even with the FDA tightening up on manufacturers, experts say it will be a long time before the manufacturers really get safer devices in place. The manufacturers may fight it because of the expense, and it may require recalls. Brian Todd, CNN, Washington

(END VIDEOTAPE)

KOSIK: Former President George W. Bush is safe at home in Dallas after an in-flight scare last night. He was on a flight from Philadelphia to his native Texas when the pilot reported smelling smoke. The flight was sent to Louisville where it landed without incident. Bush made it back to Dallas earlier this morning.

A huge three-alarm fire is under control this morning after destroying parts of an Indianapolis recycling complex and forcing evacuations of 100 homes. All that heavy black smoke could be seen for miles. Wow. The fire is expected to continue smoldering for a few more days. Its cause is still under investigation.

Unadulterated violence at a Pakistan hospital. Militants bombed, shot and killed. 28 people in a violent siege that targeted women this weekend. More on why and who's behind this.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK) KOSIK: Good morning, Washington, D.C. It's kind of a still morning there. I don't see much blowing wind there. A live look as the father-in-chief woke up on Pennsylvania Avenue this morning, and he and the family probably getting all packed up. This evening they're going to be spending the rest of Father's Day on Air Force One as they head over to Europe and the G-8 summit. It's going to be a nice day in D.C., though, for the most part, about 88 degrees, but thunderstorms expected to move in later today.

A bloody string of attacks, including a bombed university bus and a violent hospital siege in Pakistan this weekend, leaving dozens dead and growing fears of insecurity, especially for women who were the target of the attacks. In total, 28 people, including four militants, were killed. And according to a police official, the 14 bus victims were teachers and students, all women. Saima Mohsin, news in Islamabad with the latest.

SAIMA MOHSIN, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Alison, people in Pakistan still reeling from these devastating attacks. 14 women, teachers and students killed in a bus bomb at their university. And then, militants struck the hospital where the injured were being taken. Two suicide bombers and a group of militants went inside holding patients, doctors and nurses hostages, detonating their bombs outside the emergency room and operating theaters. Well, police and security personnel, paramilitary forces were dropped in, hundreds of them surrounding the building, eventually by nightfall taking control and securing the safety of everyone inside. Four nurses were killed during the operation and four members of the security personnel were killed, too. Ban Ki-moon has raised concerns. The U.N. Secretary- General says that he's concerned about the increase in attacks on educators and women here in Pakistan, and he wants to see Pakistan's government cracking down, holding those responsible and arresting them.

Well, meanwhile, Pakistan's government admits that this is home-grown terrorism. In fact, Lashkar e-Jhangvi is Sunni extremist group has claimed responsibility, saying this was a revenge attack for a security crackdown against their group. Pakistan's government, only newly elected, has huge challenges on its hands. Alison?

KOSIK: Saima Mohsin, thank you.

President Obama is departing for Europe tonight. He is heading to Northern Ireland ahead of the G-8 summit in Belfast. That's where we find Jim Boulden this morning. Jim, what is on the agenda for the meeting?

JIM BOULDEN, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Yes, good morning, Alison. Well, it's still about 24 hours until Mr. Obama makes a speech here in Belfast before the G-8. Then they move out to the southwest of the province where the G-8 meeting will begin in earnest Monday afternoon. It's very interesting because the agenda is going to be very economic. A lot of it has to do with tax havens, a lot of it has to do with corporate taxes, what they're calling corporate tax evasion by some of the large, multinational companies. That's very much on the agenda, but of course, things like Syria often take over when it comes to a G- 8 meeting, so very much we'll have bilaterals between Mr. Obama and the prime minister of the U.K, David Cameron. Syria will certainly come up in those bilaterals and France will have a very important role to play in that as well. So, there's lots and lots on the agenda. What's interesting, you know, Alison, here in Belfast, we saw demonstrations yesterday. Nothing like what we've seen in the past G- 8 summits where you've seen a lot of violence and a lot of mayhem. And that just hasn't taken place here. Yes, peaceful demonstrations through the streets of Belfast. A lot of unions are saying they don't want to see austerity cuts, they would like to see Guantanamo Bay closed down, for instance.

You've seen a lot of this kind of rhetoric and a lot of people marching the streets, but very peaceful. There is an unprecedented amount of security ahead of the G-8 summit, Alison. A large wall is built around this very remote golf resort where they'll be meeting. And it's very difficult for people to get even close to it, because of course, you have two reasons -- one is that in the past, as I said, you had G-8 - you had G-8 protesters, but also, this is Northern Ireland. This is an event that would be unprecedented even ten years ago with all the troubles that have happened here. Things have calmed down, of course, in the last ten years, but they're not going to take any chances, Alison.

KOSIK: Jim, I'm expecting to hear a discussion on Syria after the news that the government is using chemical weapons against rebel fighters. Syria, I'm thinking, is going to be a topic of discussion?

BOULDEN: A very strong topic of discussion, because the U.K. has made it very clear and made it clear again this morning that they're not interested in arming the rebels. The U.K. has a different stance than the U.S. They're not saying the U.S. is wrong. They're just saying they have a different stance on this. They're doing what they call nonlethal support for what they say now is, to them, the legitimate government of Syria. So, there's a difference in opinion with that. And of course, the French would be very involved in this as well. So, many of the bilateral talks, especially when you think of Mr. Putin also being at Downing Street today talking to David Cameron, coming in from Russia before the G-8 summit. You would see Syria very much the top of the agenda with every single bilateral discussions going on around what is normally an economic summit, Alison.

KOSIK: You know, many skeptics of G-8 summit say a lot of this is discussion, nothing really concrete comes out. What do you say about that for this time around?

BOULDEN: I know, we debate that. We debate that, don't we? For years and years and years. I've been covering G-7s and G-8s for 25 years, really. What they always say is it's always better to have bilateral, face-to-face discussions. When you think about, when the G-7 didn't have Russia. Now it has Russia and it's called the G-8. Mr. Putin is very important in decisions like Syria, because obviously he's on the other side of, say, where the U.S. is on this. So, for them to be able to have an excuse to meet face to face I think is very critical, even if that wasn't officially on the agenda, Alison.

KOSIK: OK. Jim Boulden, thank you. Sarah Palin is back in the spotlight, speaking at the Faith and Freedom Conference. She is referencing Islam, making some surprising comments. More of that coming up.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

KOSIK: Ah, good morning, New York City. A live look at the Big Apple as Manhattan wakes up on this Father's Day. Brunch plans? Lunch plans? Any of those? Hopefully. Dads in the city, time for you to get spoiled. Looks like it's going to be a pretty nice day, at least for most of the day, but I'm hearing afternoon thunderstorms expected to move in later today.

Sarah Palin's back in the spotlight, ruffling some feathers, too. She headlined the Faith and Freedom Coalition Conference in Washington yesterday, a big gathering for social conservatives, and she shocked some people by referencing Islam when she said Obama shouldn't intervene in Syria.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

SARAH PALIN: I say until we have someone who knows what they're doing, I say let Allah sort it out.

(LAUGHTER)

KOSIK: After her speech, CNN asked her about her political future and if we'll be seeing more of her this year.

PALIN: Absolutely, more than ever we will be out there, because as I said in my speech, you know, time's a wasting. Things are moving really quickly, and if we don't get out there and defend this republic, then America will be transformed into something that we do not recognize. So, we will do all that we can to help make a positive difference.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

KOSIK: It's going to be a busy week in Washington as we could see some major decisions from the Supreme Court. CNN political editor Paul Steinhauser has your political week ahead. Paul?

PAUL STEINHAUSER, CNN POLITICAL EDITOR: Hey, good morning, Alison. The Supreme Court is back in the spotlight tomorrow, as it issues more opinions. By the end of the month, the high court's expected to rule on such contentious issues as affirmative action, voting rights and same-sex marriage. More big votes are expected this week by the full Senate on immigration reform bill supported by a bipartisan group of eight senators. If immigration reform eventually passes through the Democrat-controlled Senate, it will face even higher hurdles in the GOP-dominated House. They start action on their own bill this week.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

REP. JOHN BOEHNER, (R ), HOUSE SPEAKER: Immigration reform, it's a very difficult issue, but I don't intend to bring an immigration bill to the floor that violates what I and what my - embers of my party, what our principles are.

STEINHAUSER: With a week to go until a crucial special Senate election in Massachusetts, Democrats are bringing in another big gun to try and keep the seat in party hands. President Obama and former President Clinton already hit the campaign trail in the Bay State. This week, it's vice president Joe Biden's turn. Alison?

KOSIK: Paul Steinhauser, thank you.

So, let me ask you this, what do superman and Jesus have in common? Well, both have a pretty good chance of being discussed in your pulpit today. We'll tell you more.

But before we go to break, we want to pay tribute to our own dads this Father's Day. So, to all the dads of your very hard-working CNN weekend morning show team, happy Father's Day.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

KOSIK: Wildfires in Colorado, flash floods in Missouri. Will the sun shine on your Father's Day celebration? Let's go ahead and bring in meteorologist Jennifer Delgado in the CNN severe weather center. Jennifer, give us the forecast.

JENNIFER DELGADO, METEOROLOGIST: Hi, Alison. Well, the sun isn't shining this morning on Father's Day across parts of the Midwest. Rainfall has been coming down like crazy, and some of these locations, look at this, we're talking eight to ten inches of rainfall. We saw images of flash flooding coming down through parts of southern Missouri, and we're going to continue to see those problems because we do have flash flood watches in place through parts of Kansas as well as Missouri. And you can still see on the radar rain through areas like St. Louis, Chicago. You're going to be drying out. You'll start to see the sunshine out there. Good for you dads up there. Now, for parts of the Ohio Valley, showers and thunderstorms in the forecast and the same for the northeast, but for the northeast, you have time to go outside and enjoy a little breakfast out there, say if you're in New York or Philadelphia. But then the clouds and the rain, that all moves in a little bit later into the afternoon as well as into the evening.

So, here's our wide view, pointing out to you in addition to the rain across parts of the Midwest, we're going to be looking at the potential for some severe storms out there, and some of those storms, we're talking for areas like Kansas City as well as into Omaha we're going to see some of these storms producing some damaging wind as well as some hail.

And then down towards the southeast, just really some pop-up storms across parts of Florida. Georgia, we're really going to keep some sunshine for you, and the same for California. That's your free gift for Father's Day. But there is just kind of a flaw in the forecast, and that is for the U.S. Open. It looks like rain is going to be in the forecast for today as well as tomorrow. And then for Monday, we'll add in a lesser chance with only a 20 percent chance of storms. Now, Alison, you know, we are following the weather, because so many people are going to be spending outdoors with their fathers out there, enjoying the day, you know? Maybe you can't afford to buy a gift, but you can always take him outside for a nice walk or something like that.

KOSIK: I agree. That's how it ..

(CROSSTALK)

KOSIK: Yes.

Did you know there's one more Kardashian to keep up with?

DELGADO: Yeah, I heard.

There's another one! They're multiplying.

KOSIK: Reality start Kim Kardashian given birth to a baby girl yesterday, that's according to "E" news. This is the first child for Kim and her boyfriend wrapper Kanye West and there are sources at the entertainment network who say West was right by her side when she delivered. I know there had been some speculation he wouldn't be there.

DELGADO: Right. He was (inaudible), promoting his album or something like that.

KOSIK: Yes. Apparently, the baby came a few weeks earlier than expected. So, now you know what's going to come.

DELGADO: Right.

KOSIK: Now, what's going to come is that money shot of the baby.

DELGADO: Right.

Who's going to get it ...

DELGADO: They're generous (ph) working on that right now.

(LAUGHTER)

KOSIK: And this poor kid is going to be stalked the rest of her life.

DELGADO: We'll put it in the spotlight.

KOSIK: Yes.

DELGADO: That's what happens.

KOSIK: The 40th annual daytime Emmy awards ...

DELGADO: You're excited about that.

KOSIK: Do you like - do you watch that? DELGADO: No.

KOSIK: Well, then ...

(LAUGHTER)

DELGADO: But I will ... because Robin Meade's going to be performing on there today. So, that makes it pretty exciting.

KOSIK: It does. She's good, she's very good. So, what this does, is this honors the best in soaps and talk shows, children entertainment. CBS is the most nominated network, mostly for "Young and the Restless," but CNN, as you said, is in the mix with our very own Sanjay Gupta. "Sanjay Gupta MD" is nominated for outstanding special class series. That's going to be very cool. So, you can watch, I think, if you're interested, if you're actually going to watch.

DELGADO: You know, I will because I want to see Robin. She's got a new album out.

KOSIK: OK, you can watch Day Emmy Awards on our sister network HLN beginning at 8:00 P.M. Eastern with special coverage from the red carpet. That begins at 7:30. And I have to ask Andy Scholes.

DELGADO: Do you think he's a fan?

KOSIK: He watches soap. Do you watch the soaps?

DELGADO: Are there soaps anymore to watch?

"All My Children." It's gone.

ANDY SCHOLES, CNN CORRESPONDENT: You know what, I grew up, you know, I got off from, you know, preschool at noon and my mom would make me lunch and we would actually sit there and she would watch "Days of Our Lives" every day.

DELGADO: Was that torture?

SCHOLES: And, no, to be honest, I actually started watching it and watched it for a good few years. I don't watch it anymore.

KOSIK: Which one you did?

SCHOLES: I did watch "Days of Our Lives" for a few years. I'm not going to lie.

KOSIK: A lot of them are off the air, did you feel sort of nostalgic when they were cut?

SCHOLES: You know, I think "Days of Our Lives" is still kicking, so ...

KOSIK: I think it is.

SCHOLES: So, you know, and that was the only one I had an emotional attachment to at some point in my life. But ...

KOSIK: Well, a guy who admits it.

SCHOLES: Well, yeah, that's probably a bad idea, just saying that, but ...

DELGADO: Mother-son bonding.

SCHOLES: Yes.

DELGADO: Right?

SCHOLES: Something to hold on to and be sentimental about, right?

DELGADO: Right.

(LAUGHTER)

KOSIK: All right. It's been fun, guys.

DELGADO: All right.

KOSIK: All right, judging by Friday's numbers, this weekend looks to be a good one for the box office. Let's look. "Fast and Furious 6" made $2.7 million. The horror film "The Purge" made almost $3 million. The crime thriller "Now You See Me" came in at number three with $3.3 million. Director Seth Rogen's film "This is the End" came in at number two with $19 million. And finally, "Superman's" return to the big screen came in with 55 million in the first 24 hours of its opening. This weekend will likely push that film over the $100 million mark. Love "Superman." And speaking of "Superman," marketers for the movie are hoping to bring the man of steel into the pulpit. They gave free early screenings to dozens of pastors across the nation. Discussion guides based on the film were also distributed to churches. Some pastors who have seen the film say they see parallels to the Christian faith. We should mention, "Man of Steel" is a Warner Brothers film, and just like CNN, it's owned by "Time Warner."

Thanks for starting your morning with us. We've got much more coming up on "CNN Sunday Morning," which starts right now.

Good morning, I'm Alison Kosik. It's 7:00 on the East Coast, 4:00 on the West. Happy Father's Day and thanks for beginning your morning with us. First, this morning, the government is providing major, new details about how it's keeping track of your phone calls and internet use. It insists the surveillance is not as extensive as some have claimed, and it says it helps to put key terror suspects behind bars.

CNN's Rene Marsh has more for us from Washington -- Rene.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

RENE MARSH, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Well, Alison, feeling the pressure, the NSA, National Security Agency, is trying to prove to Americans this method of tracking phone calls and collecting internet data has helped prevent terror plots. Now, this intelligence community document CNN just obtained says the surveillance program helped disrupt dozens of potential terrorist plots in the United States and in more than 20 countries around the world. The document also details the intelligence community's assertion that one of the thwarted attacks was the 2009 plot to blow up the New York City subway system.

Now, because of NSA phone tracking, it says that the U.S. intelligence was able to discover a Pakistan terrorist was in contact with someone in the U.S., conspiring to carry out the attack. The NSA tipped off the FBI, and Najibullah Zazi and his co-conspirators were arrested, the plot thwarted.

The head of the very secret NSA is promising to declassify more information about specific terror plots. Senator Dianne Feinstein says that that information could be released as soon as Monday -- Alison.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

KOSIK: Rene Marsh, thank you.

Snowden has seemingly vanished without a trace in a city of 7 million people.

Our senior international correspondent Nic Robertson is on the trail in Hong Kong.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

NIC ROBERTSON, CNN INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENT (voice-over): They came for Edward Snowden, to help protect him from possible prosecution.

CROWD: I blow the whistle! I blow the whistle!

ROBERTSON: A rally in the rain in the heart of the city he claims was targeted by NSA hackers. Organizer hoped for hundreds. They got maybe 300 -- about a third journalists covering the event.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It's a war of security.

ROBERTSON: This speaker one of three legislators, voicing concerns over Snowden's fate, not surprised by the low turnout.

CLAUDIA MO, HONG KONG LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL: The grassroots here just couldn't care less about this crazy foreigner, uninvited guest who just barged into Hong Kong. What's that about? And let the authorities deal with it.

ROBERTSON (on camera): Perhaps not the numbers organizers were hoping for and hard to blame it on the weather, too, but the Tiananmen Square protests took place just days ago. There were between 50,000 and 150,000 people and it was pouring down with rain.

When he broke cover in Hong Kong, Snowden gave away his most valuable asset: his location. Checking out of this hotel barely 12 hours later, he seemed to have second thoughts, or maybe not.

Perhaps hiding here in the shadows in Hong Kong was a carefully calculated choice. Searching from here could be like looking for a needle in a haystack. This is one of the most densely populated cities in the world, 7 million people live here, 5 million of them computer users with some of the fastest Internet access in the world. Could this be a cyber spooked nirvana?

DAVID HODSON, FORMER ASST. COMMISSIONER, HONG KONG POLICE: If he's trying to get his story out into the media, then that's a very wise choice.

ROBERTSON: David Hodson was assistant police commissioner here, says Snowden will need more than cyber savvy to dodge detection.

HODSON: You live in the real world, you have to eat food, you have to sleep. You know, in my mind, there is no such thing as a secret. Who knows?

ROBERTSON: Although he is still technically free, should an arrest warrant come, he'll go on a watch list, unable to leave legally.

HODSON: So, when do they all start looking and what information do they have already?

ROBERTSON (on camera): The clock may already be ticking.

HODSON: It may well be ticking. I would imagine it almost certainly has been ticking.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We're today all blowing the whistle in support of Ed Snowden.

ROBERTSON: Outside of the U.S. consulate, Snowden's supporters hand over a letter to President Obama. Still hoping they can muster enough outrage to keep Snowden out of jail.

Nic Robertson, CNN, Hong Kong.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

KOSIK: To Springfield, Missouri, where more rain is expected today after heavy storms Saturday triggered flash flooding. This SUV got trapped by the rushing water. According to CNN affiliate KSPR, as much as nine inches of rain fell in just a few hours. Water rescues were reported as well as flooded homes. KSPR reports traffic on the James River freeway slowed to a crawl as water spilled over the road. Power was knocked out to hundreds of homes.

To Colorado now, where firefighters say they've turned the corner on what's being called the worst wildfire in that state's history. The Black Forest Fire is 55 percent contained this morning, and no more lives have been lost, but authorities say the damage has already been done is catastrophic.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP) SHERIFF TERRY MAKETA, EL PASO COUNTY, COLORADO: It looks like a nuclear bomb went off in some of those areas, and you can't even recognize whether it was a house or some other kind of structure.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

KOSIK: Another large wildfire is 40 percent contained, and others continue to burn. Across Colorado, more than 1,000 people are battling the flames.

Whether a house burns down in a wildfire is often a quick decision made by firefighters whose own lives are on the line.

Our Martin Savidge visited Black Forest, Colorado, and he caught up with some of the experts who have to make the tough calls.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

MARTIN SAVIDGE, CNN CORRESPONDENT (voice-over): No firefighter wants to let a house burn, but sometimes there's no choice.

LT. CHRIS BENOIT, FIRE DEPT.: And that's the hard part. I mean, it is a gut check doing this job, that you know going to a home, there might be some that you just can't save.

SAVIDGE: Other than life or death, one of the hardest decisions a firefighter will make is whether or not they can save a home -- demand a big fire like this, it's a decision they have to make a lot.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Go ahead.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I've got an address for you.

SAVIDGE: Todd Legler has to make that call from his truck while riding in the fire. It's based on training, experience and how he reads the land.

(on camera): You can quickly read that terrain potentially dangerous for firefighters.

TODD LEGLER, TASK FORCE LEADER: Correct.

SAVIDGE: This terrain over here, simply different topography, safer.

LEGLER: Correct.

SAVIDGE: That house could be saved.

LEGLER: Correct.

SAVIDGE: This one you might have to let go.

LEGLER: Yes.

SAVIDGE: Mike Garman also has a safe. After all, it's his crew fighting the flames. He reads the house itself. MIKE GARMAN, ENGINE BOSS, BROADMOOR FIRE DEPT.: Stucco, wood, wood roofs, tile roof, you know. If it's combustible materials, it's definitely going to be a harder home to defend.

SAVIDGE: That may sound cold or insensitive, but in the past, firefighters have stayed too long simply because it was a home and died trying to save it.

Another deciding factor is the big picture -- balancing, say, saving a home versus saving a subdivision. That's James Schanel's call.

JAMES SCHANEL, STRUCTURE PROTECTION SPECIALIST: Although a single resident as his property is dear to that person, we have to look at the overall picture of the community in general.

SAVIDGE: And remember all of this from Todd to Mike to James, it's all done in just minutes in the heat and chaos of a roaring blaze, and they say it's never, ever easy.

It's going to be the difference, in some cases, of whether a homeowner comes home to a home or not.

LEGLER: It is a tough decision to make, because you don't ever want to see anyone lose their home, but the tougher decision is, will all the firefighters come home at the end of the day?

SAVIDGE: If they could, firefighters say they would save every home. The greatest pain is knowing they can't.

Martin Savidge, CNN, Black Forest, Colorado.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

KOSIK: Such a tough job for them.

It sounds like a scary urban legend. A mom says a man snuck into her minivan and lunged at her with a knife while she was driving. This story has got a happy ending.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

KOSIK: Good morning, Atlanta.

A live look right outside the studio here in downtown Atlanta, and we want to make sure everyone knows about CNN's newest program, "NEW DAY." It launches tomorrow on CNN beginning at 6:00 a.m. very exciting. If you can't watch it, I say DVR it.

He's one of America's most notorious mob bosses, James "Whitey" Bulger. After a 16-year manhunt, the reputed mafia kingpin now sits in a courtroom facing 19 counts of murder and allegations of racketeering, extortion and money laundering.

Deb Feyerick is in Boston following the trial for us -- Deb.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE) DEBORAH FEYERICK, NATIONAL CORRESPONDENT: Alison, this is a trial that many people here in Boston thought they would never see. Now, James "Whitey" Bulger, who spent most of his life trying to avoid attention, is front and center for everyone to see.

(voice-over): These are some of the images seen by the jury. Whitey Bulger 30 years ago at the height of his power, a crime boss feared throughout Boston. Prosecutors introduced clip after clip of Bulger meeting with members of both the Italian and Irish mafia here at a garage where Bulger ran his criminal enterprise.

That enterprise, said his own lawyer, was made up of drug trafficking, extortion and loan sharking, and was worth millions upon millions of dollars.

Bulger has pleaded not guilty to charges he killed 19 people. Prosecutors emphasized those murders in opening statements, saying, "This, ladies and gentlemen, is what this case is about," underscoring the violence that characterized Bulger's so-called reign of terror from the '70s to mid-'90s, prosecutors presented an arsenal of weapons found at Bulger's hideout. Those weapons included dozens of fully- automatic machine guns and military rifles, sawed-off shotguns, semiautomatic pistols and double-edged knives, enough to go to war.

Bulger's role as an FBI informant is central to this trial. One of the first witnesses to testify was retired Massachusetts Police Colonel Thomas Foley. He led the Bulger investigation in the '80s and said he felt betrayed by corrupt FBI agents who, quote, "put a higher priority protecting their informants than on protecting public safety." The most colorful testimony came from a former bookmaker who said he paid Bulger thousands of dollars every year for nearly 14 years.

Richard O'Brien, seen on the right, described a meeting between Bulger and a man who owed him money.

(on camera): O'Brien testified that when the man balked at paying, Bulger apparently replied, "We have a business besides bookmaking, killing people like you."

O'Brien used a racier word than people, and Whitey Bulger, who had shown little emotion through the first days of the trial, threw his face back and laughed, seeming to enjoy a good story by a friend not afraid to look him in the eye -- Alison.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

KOSIK: Thanks, Deb.

A huge, three-alarm fire is under control this morning after destroying parts of an Indianapolis recycling complex and forcing evacuations of 100 homes. All that heavy, black smoke you see there could be seen for miles. The fire is expected to continue smoldering for a few more days. Its cause is still under investigation.

KOSIK: And an Orlando mother is now free on bail after being accused of using a stun gun on one of her own children because -- this is real -- her oatmeal wasn't made correctly. Oh, my gosh.

A witness apparently called the sheriff's department on Thursday when they found a note by the child saying, quote -- they didn't want to live anymore. More on this bizarre case as it develops.

This next story may remind you of an urban legend. Dorothy Baker and her two kids were driving home from the supermarket when she says a man with a knife was hiding in her back seat. He demanded $200 and then started threatening her kids. She quickly called 911 and he lunged at her, but she wrestled the knife away from him and punched him in the face!

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

DOROTHY BAKER, MOTHER: I told him to get the hell out of my car. And he said, fine, he got out and he started running. And the next thing I thought was, if he gets away, he can do this to somebody else.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

KOSIK: Good for her! She sped after him, ending up running him over. Police identified him as 53-year-old Ismail Martinez. They say he was convicted of rape in 1976. He's still in the hospital in stable condition.

Russian President Vladimir Putin may be one of the most powerful men on the planet, but he's accused of pocketing a $25,000 super bowl ring! I'll tell you who accused Putin of stealing it.

But before we go to a break, we want to pay tribute to all of our own dads on this father's day. So, to all the dads of your very hard- working CNN weekend morning show team, happy Father's Day.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

KOSIK: Good morning, Washington, D.C. A live look as the father in chief may be waking up on Pennsylvania Avenue this morning. He and the family, they're getting all packed up. This evening they're going to be heading over to Europe and the G-8 Summit.

In the meantime, though, hopefully, they'll enjoy Father's Day. Looking to be a nice day in D.C., for the most part. I think it's going to get up to about 88 degrees today, but thunderstorms are going to start rolling in later today.

Russian President Vladimir Putin is accused of stealing one of the most prized possessions in America. Patriots owner Robert Kraft says Putin stole his diamond-encrusted Super Bowl ring during a 2005 meeting in Russia. That's according to a report in "The New York Post."

Kraft says he tried to get the White House to intervene but was told it was better to say it was a gift in the interest of U.S./Russian relations. Putin's spokesman maintains the ring was, indeed, a gift.

A familiar face has the lead heading into today's final round of the U.S. Open. Andy Scholes joins us now with more in the "Bleacher Report." Good morning!

ANDY SCHOLES, BLEACHER REPORT: Good morning, Alison. Well, no one knows more about the drama during the final round of the U.S. Open than Phil Mickelson. He's never won the event, finishing second a record five times. But today, Mickelson is in position to finally get over that hump.

The course at Merion Golf Club has wreaked havoc on most of the field, but not Mickelson. He's had at least a share of the lead after every round so far. Mickelson's the only golfer under par through the first three rounds of play. He's at 1 under. He's going to tee off at 3:20 eastern this afternoon.

Now, three golfers are one shot back of Mickelson, and Tiger Woods is not one of them. Tiger had a rough third round, shooting 6 over par. He's now 9 over for the tournament. The final round kicks off later this morning.

Well, what would a Bruins/Blackhawks Stanley Cup Finals game be without overtime? Last night, with game two of the series, and they would once again need extra time to settle it, tied at 1 in overtime, Daniel Paille with the game-winner. Bruins take game two, 2-1, to even the series at a game a piece. Game three of the Stanley Cup finals is Monday night in Boston.

Well, scary moment last night in the Royals/Rays game. In the fifth inning, Eric Hosmer is going to hit this pitch right back at Alex Cobb, strikes him in the head near his right ear. Cobb was taken out on a stretcher but did remain conscious the entire way to the hospital.

Rays announced that all tests were normal and Cobb was diagnosed with a concussion. From the hospital, Cobb actually tweeted. He said, "Can't thank everyone enough for the prayers, was the only way for me to make it out of there OK. Look forward to getting back out there."

And, Alison, it's good to see that after getting hit like that, he was able to get his iPhone out or whatever phone he has at the hospital and get on Twitter.

KOSIK: It's really amazing. When I saw that video, I just wanted to duck, like the ball's coming at me.

SCHOLES: Scary moment.

KOSIK: Hazard pay, right?

SCHOLES: What did you say?

KOSIK: He gets hazard pay, I'm sure.

SCHOLES: I think they get paid pretty well in Major League Baseball.

KOSIK: Yes, that's what I meant.

All right. Tick, tock, guess what? We're less than 24 hours away from the launch of CNN's newest show. I'm going to talk with the anchors of "NEW DAY." But first, let's check in with Dr. Sanjay Gupta for a look at what's coming up on "SANJAY GUPTA, M.D." at the bottom of the hour.

Good morning, Sanjay.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

GUPTA: Well, Alison, the decision on the Plan B morning after pill may get a lot of people nervous. Even the youngest teens are going to be able to buy this over the counter without parental consent. I'm going to explain how to get the right message across about sex to your kids.

Also, some surprising advice I found on fruits and vegetables. They may be a lot less nutritious than you think.

All that coming up at 7:30 Eastern.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

KOSIK: Something's brewing here at CNN. We are just a day away from the launch of CNN's newest show called "NEW DAY." It begins tomorrow morning at 6:00. And I got a chance to chat with anchors Chris Cuomo and Kate Bolduan, who gave me a little preview of what we can expect.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

CHRIS CUOMO, CNN ANCHOR: We know this, here's the headline -- news is back in morning news when "NEW DAY" starts. We're really going to emphasize story count, having the broadest palette, letting people know what's going on not just here, but around the world. It will be an obvious emphasis right from jump.

KATE BOLDUAN, CNN ANCHOR: And it's going to be a broader definition of news. Obviously, the big headlines of the day, those drive are -- will drive the show as it drives any show, but there's also going to be a variety of stories that maybe viewers haven't seen in the past. So, there's going to be a little bit for everybody, or I would actually argue, a lot for everybody, because everyone has a variety of interests and we're going to pack it all in.

We have three hours, as you well know, Alison, so there's a lot of time to pack a lot of things in.

KOSIK: Is this show going to redefine morning TV from what we know now?

BOLDUAN: I think that's setting a high bar for us.

CUOMO: Yes.

BOLDUAN: I think if morning news is morning news. We're not going to be reinventing the morning news wheel. I mean, it is what it is. But we're going to be doing it our own way. It's going to have a very different feel from other morning shows in the past. And I think there is space in morning TV for that. Every show's got its niche and every show's got its own angle and we're going to be finding ours as well.

We've got a big team of people to be playing off of. It's not just Chris and I. It's also Michaela Pereira as well. So, the three of us bring our own perspective and our own background to each of the stories that we approach, and we're going to be playing off of that a lot during the show.

CUOMO: Every show, Alison, you know, distinguishes itself by the people who are doing it and the choices that it makes so that, over time, they start to distinguish themselves. But you know, at the bottom of the analysis, we're all trying to do the same thing. We're all trying to get information out to as many people as possible and take up their cause. How you do it, how often you do it how well you do it, that's what will define "NEW DAY."

KOSIK: Well, I'm excited to watch on Monday. Chris and Kate, very psyched for this show. Once again, I will be watching. Thank you.

BOLDUAN: Thanks, Alison.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

KOSIK: OK, so "NEW DAY" with Chris Cuomo, Kate Bolduan, Michaela Pereira, debuting tomorrow morning, 6:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. Eastern. Don't miss it.

The 40th Annual Daytime Emmy Awards are happening tonight, honoring the best in soaps, in talk shows, children's entertainment, too. CBS is the most nominated network, mostly for "The Young and the Restless." I actually used to watch that. I can admit that.

But CNN is in the mix as well with our very own "SANJAY GUPTA, M.D.," nominated for outstanding special class series. And you can watch the Daytime Emmy Awards on our sister network, HLN. That's starting going to be starting at 8:00 p.m. Eastern with special coverage beginning on the red carpet at 7:30 p.m.

All right, I'm going to see you back here at the top of the hour, 8:00 Eastern. But first, Dr. Sanjay Gupta tells us how to sit down and have a meaningful conversation with your kids about sex before someone else does.

"SANJAY GUPTA, M.D." starts right now.