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CNN NEWSROOM

Continuing Coverage of the George Zimmerman Trial

Aired June 28, 2013 - 13:00   ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


WOLF BLITZER, CNN ANCHOR: The George Zimmerman trial is in recess right now but we'll bring it to you live once they return from lunch. They're getting back to business inside that courtroom.

You're watching CNN NEWSROOM. I'm Wolf Blitzer reporting from Washington. George Zimmerman's trial set to resume any minute now. They broke for lunch more than an hour ago. Jurors have been listening to a fifth day of dramatic testimony. The last witness on the stand offered a very different account from previous witnesses about what happened the night Zimmerman shot and killed Trayvon Martin.

George Howell outside the court in Sanford, Florida. Jane Velez- Mitchell of our sister network, HLN, is joining us from New York. George, first to you. Zimmerman's neighbor, John Good, he's a state witness but he clearly corroborates Zimmerman's story that he was being pummeled in that fight with Trayvon Martin. Tell us about that testimony that occurred today.

Unfortunately, we don't have George. But maybe Jane can brief us on what happened. Jane, are you there?

JANE VELEZ-MITCHELL, CORRESPONDENT, HLN: Yes, I am, Wolf. And essentially, this witness, Jonathan Good, is good for George Zimmerman, because he corroborates his story. Essentially, he said he heard a tussle. He goes outside, he looks and the person he describes as being on the bottom fits the description in terms of the clothing he was wearing of George Zimmerman. He also said he saw a ground and pound meaning the person on the top was grounding and pounding which he modified saying he didn't see anything with 100 percent certainty and that it was downward arm movement. But certainly this is good news for George Zimmerman. I have to say, Wolf, though, that his testimony was contradicted the night before. Just last night, we had another neighbor who came out and she said she looked over and she saw a man who fit the description of George Zimmerman on top. So, in essence, the only two people who really know what happened, one is dead, the other is charged with murder. And you have all these other witnesses, residents on a dark and murky night coming out, seeing fragments and telling different stories.

BLITZER: How unusual is it, Jane, for the prosecution to call a witness who is -- clearly, they know what he is going to say? He was clearly going to help the defense.

VELEZ-MITCHELL: Well, they had to co-op him because if they didn't call him, Wolf, the other side would and then it would like look he -- they were hiding something. Essentially, they tried to break down this witness as much as possible but he was very consistent. I will say this though, most killings don't have any witnesses so we have to realize that the prosecution does have quite a few witnesses to this event. If you think about it, most murders, and this is a second- degree murder case, occur in a quiet area where nobody sees anything. So, in a way, the prosecution has a lot of witnesses, a lot of evidence. The only problem is they're telling different stories. They are contradicting each other and they're even contradicting themselves because a lot of these people, like Jonathan Good, have given four or five versions of events and each time it's slightly different. So, the defense tries to capitalize on that.

BLITZER: They're back in the courtroom. We're waiting for the jurors to come back. They just had their lunch. You're looking at pictures of George Zimmerman right there sitting next to his attorney.

George Howell is -- I think we have him back with us. George, you've been covering this nonstop. What do we expect of the next witness? Do we know who is going to be called?

GEORGE HOWELL, CNN CORRESPONDENT: It's still unclear exactly who will be called in, Wolf. But I do want to go back to that point that Jane just mentioned. When you talk about what's happening with John Good, he did contradict himself in some places. He said, first of all, in the first statement -- and, you know, what? Let's go back now. We're seeing the first witness coming in. The next witness since the lunch break. And we can resume the conversation about John Good in a moment, but we don't want to miss the information here.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE (live): (INAUDIBLE.)

JONATHAN MANALO, WITNESS: Yes.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Thank you.

BLITZER: And what he might be able to add to this case. We'll listen in for a little while.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: You may proceed.

MANALO: OK.

BERNIE DE LA RIONDA, PROSECUTION: Can you state your name for the record, please, sir?

MANALO: Jonathan Manalo.

DE LA RIONDA: And could you spell your last name?

MANALO: M-A-N-A-L-O.

DE LA RIONDA: Are you married, sir?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: How long have you been married? I always make a mistake when I ask them.

MANALO: Seven years.

DE LA RIONDA: Thank you. And do you have any kids?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: A daughter?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. What do you do for a living, sir?

MANALO: I work for UPS.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. And how long have you been at that job?

MANALO: Twenty years.

DE LA RIONDA: I'm not going to ask you about your current address but do you live in Seminole County, Florida, sir?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. How long have you lived in Seminole County, Florida?

MANALO: About 32 years.

DE LA RIONDA: I want to draw your attention back to February of 2012. Were you living at 2861 Retreat View Circle?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: And at that time, how long had you lived at that residence?

MANALO: Approximately three years.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. I want to focus on Sunday, February the 26th of 2012. Were you home at around 7:05, 7:10, 7:15 p.m.?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. And was anyone home with you?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Who was home with you?

MANALO: My wife and my daughter.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. What were you all doing?

MANALO: My wife was sitting on the couch, and I was on the floor with my daughter assembling a coffee table we had purchased earlier in the day.

DE LA RIONDA: Your wife has already testified about the layout of your residence back in February of 2012. My question to you is, sir, do you recall, in terms of outside the residence, was it dark outside at that time?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. And do you recall the weather conditions that evening?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: And what were they?

MANALO: It was raining.

DE LA RIONDA: Now, at around 7:10 p.m. or so did you hear something outside?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Could you describe to the jury what you first heard.

MANALO: It sounded like grunts. We thought, at first, it was a couple of dogs barking.

DE LA RIONDA: And were the grunts, as you described, loud or low?

MANALO: They were loud enough that I could hear it through the window but it was still indistinct. I couldn't make anything out of it.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. Did your wife do something?

MANALO: Yes, she looked through the window.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. And when she was looking through the window, did you tell her anything about whether she should be looking through or not?

MANALO: Yes. I said stay away from the window. Don't make it our problem.

DE LA RIONDA: Did she pay attention to you?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Did you yourself ever actually look out the window?

MANALO: No.

DE LA RIONDA: Did your wife look out the window several time that evening?

MANALO: I believe so. DE LA RIONDA: And in terms of what you recall her saying as she was looking out the window or right after, did she describe something going on outside?

MANALO: She just said there were two people fighting and she sat down and I think it was around the time she heard yelling or the gunshot is when she peered through the window.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. Did you yourself hear that gunshot?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: I know at some point you ended up going outside, but did you yourself actually ever look through the window through the sliding glass door outside?

MANALO: No.

DE LA RIONDA: In terms of when you heard the gunshot, did you take any action after hearing the gunshot?

MANALO: I went outside.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. If you could, tell the jury how you would have gone outside, threw the back, the sliding door or did you take another route?

MANALO: I went through the garage.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. And in going through the garage, did grow grab anything on your way out?

MANALO: A flashlight.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. After you went out through the garage, where did go and what route did you take to get to where you saw something?

MANALO: I went to the left toward the sidewalk, and then I just walked towards the back to the T.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. And when you got back there, did you see a man standing on the sidewalk?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. And did you know that man prior to that night?

MANALO: No.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. And do you know that person now to be George Zimmerman?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Do you see that person in the courtroom today, sir?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Is that be person that just stood up for the purpose of the record?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Your honor, may the record reflect the witness identifying the defendant, George Zimmerman.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The record will so reflect.

DE LA RIONDA: When you first saw him, was the defendant standing up or sitting down or laying down?

MANALO: He was walking towards my direction.

DE LA RIONDA: And did he walk directly towards you or did he stop or what happened?

MANALO: He directly towards me.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. Now, did you have your flashlight? Did you have it illuminating or on?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. And was it dark outside?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: When you observed the defendant -- did you say he walked toward you?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Did he have anything in his hands when you observed?

MANALO: As I came around the corner, I noticed that he had his cell phone to his left ear.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. And was he holding it just to his ear?

MANALO: Yes, it looked that.

DE LA RIONDA: And when you say up to his left ear, can you demonstrate?

MANALO: Like this.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. Did you notice any blood on him, sir?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: And where did you notice the blood?

MANALO: Down his nostrils, streaming down both sides of his lips, I believe.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: (INAUDIBLE.)

MANALO: Of his lips.

DE LA RIONDA: Could you tell whether there was any damage to his nose, sir?

MANALO: No.

DE LA RIONDA: And did you subsequently also see some blood on the back of his head?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Sir, did you end up taking some photographs using your cell phone?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Specifically, did you take a photograph of the back of his head?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Did you take a photograph of the person you now know has been identified as Trayvon Martin on the ground?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: And did you also take a photograph of a flashlight that was on the ground?

MANALO: Next to the body, yes.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. And I apologize. It was two flashlights. It was one big flashlight next to the body that you photographed?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. Did you use your cell phone to take those photographs?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: And did you take -- using your cell phone, did you use the flash from the cell phone or the flashlight you had with you?

MANALO: I used the flashlight.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. I'm going to ask you to, if you could, look at -- over here to the wall to your -- thank you, your honor. Let me just -- Setting up where you lived at that time back in February of 2012. Showing you, for the purpose of the record, state's exhibit one, that's been introduced into evidence. This is Google or aerial photograph of the Retreat at Twin Lakes. Do you recognize that? MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: And I'm going hopefully get this to work and show you the area that I'm going to focus on. Would your residence be right here where I'm pointing to, sir?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. The route you took, did -- you said you went out the garage, did you take this walkway that I'm --

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: -- pointing at the aerial and go back to the back here?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Do you recall approximately when you came into contact with the defendant when he was walking towards you where approximately you would have had contact with him? And I'm going to move the arrow around and you tell me where to stop.

MANALO: A little higher.

DE LA RIONDA: Higher?

MANALO: At the T.

DE LA RIONDA: Right here?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. Showing you state's exhibit number three. Can you see your residents from that photograph, sir?

MANALO: No.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. As state's exhibit three, in terms of how dark it was, is this area that I'm pointing to here establish how dark it was out there?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. State's exhibit number five, does that photograph in any way depict part of your residence, sir?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: And what part of your residence does that show?

MANALO: The back patio.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. And am I pointing the aerial there -- area to it?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: This light that's on, was that on when this shooting and this happened or did -- was that turned on after?

MANALO: That was off and it was turned on after.

DE LA RIONDA: And is this the area approximately where you came into contact with the defendant, George Zimmerman?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. Near where the T is or the dog trash receptacle?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: State's exhibit number six, would this have been your back porch or the pavement that's been described as like the back porch of your residence?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. State's exhibit number 10, what does that photograph show, sir?

MANALO: It shows the back of my house, the T.

DE LA RIONDA: And is this the area you came walking out of when you came into contact with the defendant?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: State's exhibit number 11, do you recognize that?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. What is that photograph show, sir?

MANALO: The back of the house and where the crime scene finally ended.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. When you came out there, was -- were all these markers out there when you first came out?

MANALO: No.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. Were you the first person after the shot that came into contact with anybody out there, the defendant and the victim on the ground?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. In other words, were there police officers out there when you came out there?

MANALO: No.

DE LA RIONDA: Did police officers arrive subsequently to you being out there?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. State's exhibit number 34, do you recognize what that is?

MANALO: It looks like the front of the house.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. And that would have been your residence back in February of 2012?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Yes. And state's exhibit 35, is that showing just a close-up of that area?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: State's exhibit 37, that's a daytime photograph. Does that show the area that you've been talking about?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: State's exhibit 40, tell us what that photograph shows.

MANALO: The sidewalk towards the T. That's where I had taken the path to the back.

DE LA RIONDA: When you left out from the garage you would have taken this route this way?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Thank you, sir. State's exhibit 76, did you take this photograph, sir?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Now, it was raining that night. Was it not?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Do you recall the position that you would have taken this photograph? it shows the back of the defendant Mr. Zimmerman's head. Was he sitting down, standing up, or how was he?

MANALO: He was squatting.

DE LA RIONDA: Was that after the officers came?

MANALO: This was before.

DE LA RIONDA: State's exhibit 77. What is that photograph show?

MANALO: I believe that's Trayvon Martin.

DE LA RIONDA: Is this the way you found the victim in this case Mr. Martin's body? MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Did you move the body?

MANALO: No.

DE LA RIONDA: When you observed Mr. Martin's body his hands were underneath his body? Is that correct? His torso?

MANALO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Did you tamper or mess with that at all? I know (INAUDIBLE) did you move his hands or turn him upside down?

MANALO: I never left the sidewalk, so no.

DE LA RIONDA: This photograph that you would have taken of Mr. Trayvon Martin's body, the light that's shining on there is that from your flashlight again?

MANOLO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: State's exhibit 78, you took this photograph too sir, using your cellphone?

MANOLO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: What were you trying to show in that photograph, sir?

MANOLO: There was an object next to him. I didn't see any other objects on the ground other than the little flashlight on the beginning part of the T. It stood out.

DE LA RIONDA: Am I pointing to it in this part of photograph, state's exhibit 78?

MANOLO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Is that it?

MANOLO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: The light showing on there is that from your flashlight?

MANOLO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Your honor, I'm through with -- thank you very much. May I approach the witness?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Yes, you may.

DE LA RIONDA: Mr. Manalo, back in February 2012, specifically February 26th, 2012, showing you state's exhibit 139 with would you residence have been 2861 where I already have your wife's name on there?

MANOLO: Yes. DE LA RIONDA: Is this area depict in terms of you going out the garage and coming out here?

MANOLO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Is that what you described earlier?

MANOLO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Thank you.

What I want to do now is have you elaborate what we talked about specifically your contact with the defendant. The flashlight that you saw on the ground that you photographed, was that flashlight on in terms of was it illuminating?

MANOLO: No.

DE LA RIONDA: When you observed the victim in this case Mr. Martin on the ground, Trayvon Martin on the ground was he moving at all or say anything?

MANOLO: No.

DE LA RIONDA: I apologize if I already asked you. Did you say his hands and arms under his torso, his hands were?

MANOLO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: If you could tell the jury when you first came into contact with the defendant when you observed him if you said anything to him and if he said anything to you. Tell us what happened.

MANOLO: Okay, I came around the corner and he was walking to me, and I asked him do I need to call 911? He says no. I just got off the phone with them. And then he asked me --

DE LA RIONDA: At that point did you see a gun, sir?

MANOLO: I did not see a gun.

DE LA RIONDA: Did you other than when the police got there, did you see a gun on the defendant?

MANOLO: No.

DE LA RIONDA: Did it appear to you as if the defendant had been in a fight, sir?

MANOLO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Did he speak to you, sir?

MANOLO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Did he respond to your questions? MANOLO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Did he appear as if he was out of it like not thinking clearly?

MANOLO: No.

DE LA RIONDA: Did you have any trouble understanding him when he spoke?

MANOLO: No.

DE LA RIONDA: Did you ask him something when you found out he had a gun, did you asking him anything about the gun?

MANOLO: I asked him what caliber he used.

DE LA RIONDA: What did he say?

MANOLO: 9 millimeter.

DE LA RIONDA: Did the police officer arrive?

MANOLO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Could you tell the jury what happened when the officer arrived?

MANOLO: He says for my safety I'm going to handcuff you. He says okay. He had his cell phone in his hand so he kind of like tossed it on the ground. He says can you call my wife.

DE LA RIONDA: Let me interrupt you. You say he had the cell phone, are you speaking of the defendant George Zimmerman?

MANOLO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: You said when the officer came he tossed it on the ground, he being Mr. Zimmerman tossed it on the ground?

MANOLO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Okay, I apologize. I interrupted you. Did the officer ask him who shot Trayvon Martin? I know he didn't use the word Trayvon Martin, but who shot the person?

MANOLO: I don't remember.

DE LA RIONDA: Did -- at that time when the officer -- I apologize I interrupted you -- the office asked him about a gun, what happened then?

MANOLO: He put him in handcuffs and asked me to call his wife.

DE LA RIONDA: Did the officer ask the defendant whether he had a gun on him? MANOLO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: The defendant indicated or pointed or did something related to where the gun was?

MANOLO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Tell us if you could the circumstances related to that?

MANOLO: He put his right arm up and said I have it here.

DE LA RIONDA: Had you seen a gun prior to him saying that?

MANOLO: No.

DE LA RIONDA: When the defendant put his right arm up and indicated he had a gun, at that time were you able to observe it?

MANOLO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Where was the gun?

MANOLO: Inside the waistbands holster.

DE LA RIONDA: Prior to that had you seen gun at all?

MANOLO: No.

DE LA RIONDA: Did you observe the officer handcuff the defendant and do something with the gun?

MANOLO: Yes, he put it in his utility belt so he would have control of it.

DE LA RIONDA: Did the officer tell the defendant he was going to put him in handcuffs?

MANOLO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: The defendant replied and said that was fine?

MANOLO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: You mentioned something about the defendant throwing the phone on the ground. Tell us what happened regarding that.

MANOLO: He asked me the call his wife. I said let him put you in handcuffs. Once he did that, I picked up his phone, put it in his pocket and I zipped it up and then I called his wife through my phone.

DE LA RIONDA: He asked you to call his wife meaning the defendant asked you to call his wife?

MANOLO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: You stated you picked up the cell phone and you put it in whose pocket?

MANOLO: Zimmerman's pocket.

DE LA RIONDA: Do you know which pocket?

MANOLO: Left side pocket.

DE LA RIONDA: Why did can you pick the left pocket?

MANOLO: Why did I pick that pocket? It was closest to me.

DE LA RIONDA: The defendant, Mr. Zimmerman, asked you to call his wife. Did you do that?

MANOLO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Did you know her number?

MANOLO: No.

DE LA RIONDA: Did you know her before him telling you to call her?

MANOLO: No.

DE LA RIONDA: How were you able to get the number?

MANOLO: He gave me her number.

DE LA RIONDA: Did you actually dial her number?

MANOLO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Did can you call her?

MANOLO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Did you talk to her?

MANOLO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Tell us the circumstances of what happened when you, what did you tell her? What did she say and if the defendant said anything while this was going on?

MANOLO: Okay. I had a connection with her right away and said your husband is involved in a shooting. He's being handcuffed and will be held for questioning at the Sanford police department. And around that time, he kinda cut me off and he says "just tell her I shot someone."

DE LA RIONDA: He cut you off, the defendant cut you off?

MANOLO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: He said what now?

MANOLO: Just tell her I shot someone.

DE LA RIONDA: Did you respond to that?

MANOLO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: What did you say?

MANOLO: Okay. He just shot someone.

DE LA RIONDA: You're saying to his wife on the phone?

MANOLO: Yes I was saying it to his wife.

DE LA RIONDA: In terms of when he said that, how would you describe the defendant's demeanor?

MANOLO: Like I was taking too long to say what I had to say.

DE LA RIONDA: You mentioned you saw the victim's body, the person you now know as Trayvon Martin. Did you see any movement at any time out there?

MANOLO: No.

DE LA RIONDA: Did you ever hear him say anything?

MANOLO: No.

DE LA RIONDA: Now in terms of when you heard the shot and when ended up going outside, if you could estimate, how long did it take you upon hearing the shot, go out the garage and go outside and come into contact with the defendant Mr. Zimmerman?

MANOLO: It could have been ten, 20 seconds.

DE LA RIONDA: When you first observed was your first observation he had been in a fight and beaten?

MANOLO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Did you remain outside while the officers arrived?

MANOLO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Do you -- were you present when they attempted to revive or safe the life of Trayvon Martin?

MANOLO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Could you tell us what you recall seeing or observing about that?

MANOLO: The first officer arrived and turned him over. I think more were starting to come. He was asking for a bag to do compressions on his chest. I watched them perform CPR.

DE LA RIONDA: Regarding the bag, did you go somewhere and get a bag the assist the officers?

MANOLO: I went through the garage and my wife handed me a bag.

DE LA RIONDA: Walmart bag?

MANOLO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Did you come back out and provide that to the officer in an attempt to save Trayvon Martin's life?

MANOLO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Prior to that night had you ever met George Zimmerman?

MANOLO: No.

DE LA RIONDA: Had you ever met Trayvon Martin?

MANOLO: No.

DE LA RIONDA: Were you ever involved in a neighborhood watch program at all?

MANOLO: No.

DE LA RIONDA: Why not?

MANOLO: I have work. I have other things that I have to do. I have a 6-year-old to take care of.

DE LA RIONDA: When you first came into contact with the defendant that evening, did he appear to be in shock?

MANOLO: No.

DE LA RIONDA: What is your opinion based on, sir?

MANOLO: He wasn't acting like anything different. He was coherent. He was responding to my questions like any other person.

DE LA RIONDA: In your actions there before the officer came, did you observe the defendant any time look back at the body of Trayvon Martin?

MANOLO: No.

DE LA RIONDA: Did the defendant appear calm?

MANOLO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Thank you, sir. I have no further questions.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Thank you. Mr. O'Mara?

MARK O'MARA, DEFENSE ATTORNEY: This is Mr. West, your honor.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Mr. West.

WOLF BLITZER, CNN ANCHOT: All right, as we get ready to hear the cross-examination right now from the defense attorney Don West. We'll take a quick break. We'll resume our special coverage. A lot more going on in this George Zimmerman trial. Stay with us.

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