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NANCY GRACE

Zimmerman Prosecution`s Last Witnesses

Aired July 5, 2013 - 20:00   ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


NANCY GRACE, HOST: Day nine of the George Zimmerman-Trayvon Martin murder trial. What a day. A lot went down in that Florida courtroom, all of it critical to the jury`s decision.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

BERNIE DE LA RIONDA, PROSECUTOR: Ma`am, can you state your name for the record, please?

SYBRINA FULTON, TRAYVON MARTIN`S MOTHER: Sybrina Fulton.

DE LA RIONDA: And could you spell your first name and last name?

SYBRINA FULTON: My first name is S-Y-B-R-I-N-A. The last name is Fulton -- F-U-L-T-O-N.

DE LA RIONDA: Are you married, ma`am?

SYBRINA FULTON: I`m divorced.

DE LA RIONDA: And do you have any children?

SYBRINA FULTON: Yes, I do.

DE LA RIONDA: And can you tell us who they are and their names?

SYBRINA FULTON: My youngest son is Trayvon Benjamin Martin. He`s in heaven. And my older son is Jahvaris Lamar (ph) Fulton.

DE LA RIONDA: Do you live in Miami, ma`am?

SYBRINA FULTON: Yes, I do.

DE LA RIONDA: And have you lived in Miami your entire life?

SYBRINA FULTON: Yes, I have.

DE LA RIONDA: And who do you live in Miami with?

SYBRINA FULTON: My son, Jahvaris Fulton, and my brother, Ronald Fulton.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. Was Trayvon Benjamin Martin your son?

SYBRINA FULTON: Yes, he was.

DE LA RIONDA: And was his date of birth February the 5th of 1995?

SYBRINA FULTON: Yes, it is.

DE LA RIONDA: Are you working at this time, ma`am?

SYBRINA FULTON: I am employed. I`m on leave right now.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. Where are you currently employed, or who are you currently employed with where you`re on leave?

SYBRINA FULTON: I actually work for Miami-Dade County public housing and community development.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. How long have you been working there, ma`am?

SYBRINA FULTON: I`ve been with the county for 24 years. I`ve been with the housing agency for about 10 years.

DE LA RIONDA: And prior to going to the housing agency, what did you do?

SYBRINA FULTON: I did code enforcement for 11 years.

DE LA RIONDA: And can you briefly tell us about your education background, ma`am?

SYBRINA FULTON: I have a bachelor`s degree with a minor in communications from Grambling State University was half of my courses, and I graduated from Florida Memorial University in Miami.

DE LA RIONDA: What was your major? I`m sorry.

SYBRINA FULTON: My major was English with a minor in communications.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. Was Trayvon Martin right or left-handed?

SYBRINA FULTON: Trayvon was right-handed.

DE LA RIONDA: Trayvon Martin had two tattoos on his body. Do you know where they were on his body?

SYBRINA FULTON: He had praying hands on his right upper shoulder, with his grandmother`s and great-grandmother`s name. That`s the first tattoo. They were praying hands and they had pearls going through them.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. And do you know where the other tattoo was?

SYBRINA FULTON: The other tattoo was on his left wrist. He had my name there.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. Prior to your son`s death, had you heard him crying or yelling prior to his death? Had you ever heard him while he was growing up and while you were raising him, had you every heard him crying or yelling?

SYBRINA FULTON: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. I want to play a recording for you, ma`am.

911 OPERATOR: 911, do you need police, fire or medical?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Maybe both, I`m not sure. There`s just someone screaming outside.

911 OPERATOR: And what`s the address (INAUDIBLE)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: 1211 Twin Tree (ph) Lane.

911 OPERATOR: Twin Tree Lane? (INAUDIBLE)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Yes.

911 OPERATOR: OK. And is it a male or a female?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It sounds like a male.

911 OPERATOR: And you don`t know why?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I don`t know why. I think they`re yelling help, but I don`t know. Send someone quick, please!

911 OPERATOR: OK. Does he look hurt to you?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I can`t see him. I don`t want to go out there. I don`t know what`s going on.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: (INAUDIBLE)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: They`re sending.

911 OPERATOR: So you think he`s yelling help?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Yes.

911 OPERATOR: What is your...

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: There`s gunshots!

911 OPERATOR: You heard gunshots?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Ma`am, that screaming or yelling, do you recognize that?

SYBRINA FULTON: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: And who do you recognize that to be, ma`am?

SYBRINA FULTON: Trayvon Benjamin Martin.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: Who got the short end of the stick? Who got the long end of the stick? Trayvon Martin is dead, laying face down in the wet dirt as it rains on his body. Zimmerman walks away. Yes, his head is bleeding, but largely superficial wounds.

Now, all of that will be thrown into the pot as the jury mulls a verdict.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

MARK O`MARA, ZIMMERMAN`S DEFENSE ATTORNEY: Good morning, ma`am.

SYBRINA FULTON: Good morning.

O`MARA: Firstly, truly apologize for your loss...

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: (INAUDIBLE) improper. Not a question.

(CROSSTALK)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: You need to ask a question.

O`MARA: Excuse me?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: You need to ask a question.

O`MARA: You -- will you tell us the first time that you listened to that tape, when you listened to it? Where were you?

SYBRINA FULTON: I was here in Sanford. I believe it was the mayor`s office.

O`MARA: And that was pursuant to a request made by your lawyers to have that tape released, correct?

SYBRINA FULTON: That`s correct.

O`MARA: And my understanding is that it happened actually in the mayor`s office, correct?

SYBRINA FULTON: Yes.

O`MARA: And there were no law enforcement officers present?

SYBRINA FULTON: They were there, but they wasn`t actually in the room.

O`MARA: They were actually not allowed in the room, correct?

SYBRINA FULTON: I don`t know about that.

O`MARA: OK. Were you present there when Chief lee was talking to the mayor and to City Manager Bonaparte about the concern with having the tape released?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Objection (INAUDIBLE) hearsay.

O`MARA: I asked whether or not she was there.

(CROSSTALK)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Our objection is to hearsay, what somebody else said in her presence.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: That will be sustained as to hearsay. Rephrase your question.

O`MARA: Were you there during the time that Chief Lee, chief of police Lee, was having a conversation with the mayor and City Manager Bonaparte?

SYBRINA FULTON: No.

O`MARA: OK. When the tape was played for you, who played it for you?

SYBRINA FULTON: I`m not absolutely sure. I`m just trying to remember back. I think it was the mayor.

O`MARA: OK. It was not a law enforcement officer, correct?

SYBRINA FULTON: It was not.

O`MARA: And who was in the room when that tape was played?

SYBRINA FULTON: Trayvon`s dad, Tracy Martin, Jahvaris Fulton, Stephanie Sands (ph), Darius Sands (ph), Benjamin Crump, attorney Natalie Jackson. I believe Mayor Triplett was there, and there may have been one other person. I`m not absolutely sure, but I think Bonaparte was there.

O`MARA: When you say Bonaparte, that`s Sanford city manager Bonaparte?

SYBRINA FULTON: Yes.

O`MARA: Was the tape -- the first time you heard that tape, was it played at one time for everybody who was in the room?

SYBRINA FULTON: Yes.

O`MARA: Did any one of those witnesses listen to the tape individually, or was it all at one time?

SYBRINA FULTON: I don`t know if they listened individually, but that was my first time hearing it.

O`MARA: Well, had anybody indicated to you in that group that they had listened to the tape before?

SYBRINA FULTON: No.

O`MARA: Did Tracy Martin tell you he`d listened to the tape before?

SYBRINA FULTON: No.

O`MARA: Had you had any conversations with him about listening to the tape before that event?

SYBRINA FULTON: No.

O`MARA: Imagine that it was probably one of the worst things that you went through, to listen to that tape, correct?

SYBRINA FULTON: Absolutely.

O`MARA: And that if it was your son, in fact, screaming, as you`ve testified, that would suggest that it was Mr. Zimmerman`s fault that led to his death, correct?

SYBRINA FULTON: Correct.

O`MARA: And if it was not your son screaming, if it was, in fact, George Zimmerman, then you would have to accept the probability that it was Trayvon Martin who caused his own death, correct?

SYBRINA FULTON: I don`t understand the question.

O`MARA: OK.. If you were to listen to that tape and not hear your son`s voice, that would mean that it would have been George Zimmerman`s voice, correct?

SYBRINA FULTON: I did not hear my son screaming?

O`MARA: Correct.

SYBRINA FULTON: Is that what you`re asking?

O`MARA: Yes, ma`am.

SYBRINA FULTON: I heard my son screaming.

O`MARA: I understand. The alternative, the only alternative, would you agree, would be that if it was not your son screaming, that it would be George Zimmerman, correct?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Objection as to speculation.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Sustained.

O`MARA: You certainly had to hope that that was your son screaming even before you heard it, correct?

SYBRINA FULTON: I didn`t hope for anything. I just simply listened to the tape.

O`MARA: And in your mind, as his mother, there was no doubt whatsoever that it was him screaming, correct?

SYBRINA FULTON: Absolutely.

O`MARA: Did you have any thought in mind how you would react if you believed or didn`t hear your son`s voice?

SYBRINA FULTON: I really didn`t know what the tape was all about.

O`MARA: And everybody else in the room, when they listened to the tape, who was the first one to react?

SYBRINA FULTON: I was.

O`MARA: And everybody else then reacted similarly to you, correct?

SYBRINA FULTON: Well, they also heard the tape themselves.

O`MARA: Correct. And every one of them then told you that they agreed with your opinion that it was Trayvon Martin`s voice, correct?

SYBRINA FULTON: They didn`t tell me anything.

O`MARA: When you mentioned a moment ago that you didn`t know what the tape was about -- nobody spoke to you to tell you that you would soon be listening to screams from the event that led to your son`s death?

SYBRINA FULTON: No.

O`MARA: Mayor Triplett never said anything like that to you?

SYBRINA FULTON: No.

O`MARA: Nor did any of your other family members?

SYBRINA FULTON: They hadn`t heard the tape at that time.

O`MARA: But the question is whether or not anyone told you to prepare yourself for the event, the trauma of having to listen to somebody scream moments before your son was shot.

SYBRINA FULTON: No.

O`MARA: Nobody mentioned that to you?

SYBRINA FULTON: No.

O`MARA: Tracy Martin never told you about that?

SYBRINA FULTON: No.

O`MARA: And you just listened to it one time, correct?

SYBRINA FULTON: That`s it.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GRACE: Day nine of the Zimmerman trial. What a day.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

DE LA RIONDA: You were asked about hope. Did you hope your son wouldn`t be dead, Trayvon Martin? You were asked by defense counsel about hope, didn`t you. Were you still hoping that he would still be alive?

SYBRINA FULTON: I hoped he was still alive.

DE LA RIONDA: And (INAUDIBLE) ask this, but I`m asking. Did you enjoy listening to that recording?

SYBRINA FULTON: Absolutely not.

DE LA RIONDA: Thank you. No further questions.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: OK, Ms. Fulton...

(CROSSTALK)

O`MARA: ... Ma`am, and (INAUDIBLE) I don`t mean to put you through this any more than necessary, than we need to. But you certainly would hope that your son, Trayvon Martin, did nothing that could have led to his own death, correct?

SYBRINA FULTON: What was your question again?

O`MARA: You certainly hoped -- as a mom, you certainly hope that your son, Trayvon Martin, would not have done anything that would have led to his own death, correct?

SYBRINA FULTON: What I hoped for is that this would have never happened and he would still be here. That`s my hope.

O`MARA: Absolutely. And now dealing with the reality that he`s no longer here, you certainly hope, as a mom -- hold out hope as long as you can that Trayvon Martin was in no way responsible for his own death, correct?

SYBRINA FULTON: I don`t believe he was.

O`MARA: Yes. And that`s the hope that you continue, correct?

SYBRINA FULTON: I don`t understand what you`re trying to ask me.

O`MARA: OK. I don`t need to put you through more than I need to. No other questions, your honor.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: Is Zimmerman`s story reasonable? Does it make sense? Does it make sense that a boy who was at one moment afraid of Zimmerman to the point he began to run -- does it make sense that that same boy would then turn around and come back on Zimmerman and attack him, jump out of the bushes?

But when you hear Zimmerman speak, he is so lucid, he is so calm, he is so methodical in his story, and his story doesn`t change. This is going to boil down to a question of veracity, a question of credibility. Who will the jury believe?

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: You may proceed.

DE LA RIONDA: May I (INAUDIBLE) your honor? (INAUDIBLE)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Yes, you may.

DE LA RIONDA: Ms. Fulton, I want to show you part of state`s exhibit 149. And do you recognize this button here?

SYBRINA FULTON: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: And is this a button that your son always wore, Mr. Trayvon Martin, always wore?

SYBRINA FULTON: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Thank you. No further questions.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Any cross?

O`MARA: No. Thank you, your honor.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: OK, thank you. May Ms. Fulton be excused?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Yes, your honor.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: OK, thank you very much, ma`am.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN AUDIO CLIP)

GEORGE ZIMMERMAN, CHARGED WITH MURDER: This guy looks like he`s up to no good, or he`s on drugs or something.

DISPATCHER: Are you following him?

GEORGE ZIMMERMAN: Yes.

DISPATCHER: OK, we don`t need you to do that.

GEORGE ZIMMERMAN: OK.

911 OPERATOR: So you think he`s yelling help?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Yes. I don`t know why. I think they`re yelling help, but I don`t know.

911 OPERATOR: All right, what is your...

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: There`s gunshots!

911 OPERATOR: You just heard gunshots?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Yes.

911 OPERATOR: How many?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Just one. Just send someone quick!

(END AUDIO CLIP)

GRACE: Just when we think nothing could top the last witness, take a listen to this.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

JOHN GUY, PROSECUTOR: Good morning, sir. Could you please tell the members of the jury your name?

JAHVARIS FULTON, TRAYVON MARTIN`S BROTHER: Jahvaris Fulton.

GUY: Mr. Fulton, how old are you?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Twenty-two.

GUY: In what city do you currently live?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Miami.

GUY: Can I ask you to (INAUDIBLE) just a little bit so we can get you into that microphone? How long have you lived in the Miami area?

JAHVARIS FULTON: All my life.

GUY: Are you in school?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

GUY: Where is that you attend school?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Florida International university.

GUY: And what year will you be at FIU this coming fall?

JAHVARIS FULTON: This will be my senior year.

GUY: Do you have a major?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

GUY: And what is that?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Information technology.

GUY: And are you a full-time student?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

GUY: Are you related to Trayvon Martin?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

GUY: How so?

JAHVARIS FULTON: That`s my brother.

GUY: And are you older or younger than Trayvon Martin?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Older.

GUY: How much older?

JAHVARIS FULTON: About four-and-a-half years.

GUY: What is your mother`s name?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Sybrina Fulton.

GUY: And what is your -- are you related to Tracy Martin?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

GUY: How are you related to Tracy Martin?

JAHVARIS FULTON: He`s my dad.

GUY: Is he your biological father?

JAHVARIS FULTON: No.

GUY: Why do you call him your dad?

JAHVARIS FULTON: He`s the only dad I know. I grew up with him.

GUY: Did you and Trayvon Martin grow up together?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

GUY: And how would you describe your relationship with Trayvon Martin growing up? Were y`all close or what?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes, we were very close.

GUY: Despite the four years age difference, did the two of you, you and Trayvon Martin, do things together when you were growing up?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

GUY: Let me turn your attention to the month of February 2012. Were you and Trayvon Martin living together at that time?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

GUY: And who did you live with?

JAHVARIS FULTON: My mom, Sybrina Fulton, my brother and my uncle.

GUY: Let me turn your attention to Sunday, February 26th. Were you aware that Trayvon Martin was with his father, Tracy Martin, in Sanford, Florida, that day?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

GUY: Did you go to Sanford that weekend?

JAHVARIS FULTON: No.

GUY: At some point, were you notified that Trayvon had been killed in Sanford?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

GUY: And when were you told?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Monday.

GUY: And who told you?

JAHVARIS FULTON: My mother.

GUY: Since your brother`s death, have you had an opportunity to hear a tape that contains screaming and the gunshot?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

GUY: Can you estimate for the members of the jury approximately how many times you`ve heard that tape?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Anywhere between 10 and 15 times.

GUY: And how have you heard it? Have you heard it on a computer, on TV, on the Internet, or what?

JAHVARIS FULTON: I`ve heard it from a computer and from TV.

GUY: And do you recognize any voices on that tape?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

GUY: Whose voice do you recognize?

JAHVARIS FULTON: My brother.

GUY: Trayvon`s?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

GUY: What parts of the recording do you recognize as your brother`s voice?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yelling and screaming.

GUY: Had you ever heard Trayvon Martin yell or scream as the two of you were growing up?

JAHVARIS FULTON: I heard him yell, but not like that, but yes.

GUY: Your honor, that`s all I have. Thank you.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GRACE: Day nine of the Zimmerman trial. What a day. A lot went down in that Florida courtroom in the last hours. Let`s go into the courtroom now.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

O`MARA: Good morning, sir.

JAHVARIS FULTON: Good morning.

O`MARA: You actually were not as certain that it was your brother`s voice when you first heard it, correct?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Correct.

O`MARA: And in fact, you had talked to a reporter about whose voice it may have been, correct?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

O`MARA: And you told that reporter, Gio Benitez, on March 31st of 2012 that you weren`t sure, correct?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

O`MARA: You said that, honestly, really haven`t listened to it. I heard it, I think it was my brother, but I`m not completely positive, correct?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Uh-huh.

O`MARA: You have to answer out loud.

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

O`MARA: So having listened to the tape -- the first time you listened to it was in the mayor`s office in Sanford, correct?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

O`MARA: And your mom was there, correct?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

O`MARA: And other family members and at least two attorneys, correct?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

O`MARA: OK. And during that time, you listened to it along with everybody else, correct?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

O`MARA: And from having listened to it, it was your thought that it might be Trayvon, correct?

JAHVARIS FULTON: When we heard it in the mayor`s office -- how do I explain? I wasn`t -- I guess I didn`t want to believe that it was him. So that`s why during that interview, I said I wasn`t sure. I guess it was listening to it was clouded by shock and denial and sadness. I didn`t really want to believe that it was him.

JAHVARIS FULTON: Sure. Do you recall the date or thereabouts that you listened to that? Middle of March, March 16th of 2012, would that be about right?

JAHVARIS FULTON: I don`t remember.

O`MARA: Let me ask it this way. It was a full two weeks before you had your sitdown with the reporter, Benitez, wasn`t it?

JAHVARIS FULTON: I`m not sure.

O`MARA: OK. If I were to -- I mentioned a moment ago that the interview was on CBS Miami channel 4 on March 31st. Would you have any reason to contest that?

JAHVARIS FULTON: No. I`m not sure of the dates.

O`MARA: OK. And I mentioned also that the tape -- and we`ll find this out from other witnesses, but the tape was played for the family on March 16th or thereabouts. So would you have any reason to contest that?

JAHVARIS FULTON: No.

O`MARA: So if that was about two weeks, did you listen to the tape in between?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Probably not.

O`MARA: In the two weeks...

JAHVARIS FULTON: (INAUDIBLE)

O`MARA: I`m sorry?

JAHVARIS FULTON: (INAUDIBLE) no.

O`MARA: Well, the reporter actually played the tape, didn`t he, when you were there?

JAHVARIS FULTON: I`m not sure. Actually, could you -- I`m not sure of the time you`re talking about anymore.

O`MARA: OK. Do you -- let me ask it this way, then. Do you recall sitting down with Gio Benitez, a reporter for CBS Miami channel 4, and talking to him about who you thought may or may not have been on the tape?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

O`MARA: Do you remember that event?

JAHVARIS FULTON: I remember.

O`MARA: I`m sorry?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes, I remember.

O`MARA: And that was the event I talked about earlier, where you first answered to him -- his question was, Who did you hear crying for help? Do you remember that question?

JAHVARIS FULTON: I don`t remember the question.

O`MARA: OK. Then what I`d like to do with the court`s indulgence is to play that recording for you and ask if that -- if you remember the call (ph) at that point, or the TV program at that point.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Judge, I object to that being improper impeachment.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We would need to do that first outside the presence of the jury.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: I believe crucial to the state and to the defense to see George Zimmerman immediately after the shooting, when he comes into the police station with blood shooting out the back of his head. He`s speaking without a lawyer, cooperates fully. The defense is going to use that to their advantage. And how!

Now, here`s the thing. Zimmerman is a would-be police officer. OK? He feels an affinity with the people that are interviewing him or interrogating him. He repeatedly refers to Trayvon Martin as "the suspect." His frame of mind is very coherent. He`s extremely lucid.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

O`MARA: (INAUDIBLE) outside the jury. I think that he has now denied the question and answer, and I think it`s proper impeachment to play his own words for the jury.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I think he said he wasn`t sure, and the rules of impeachment require that you show the witness the statement or let them listen to the statement, and that`s done to themselves, and since that`s going to be played in open court, the jury needed to be removed. So you can play it for him and we go from there.

O`MARA: Yes, your honor.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: And judge, just for the record, I believe the witness`s answer was that he told the reporter that he wasn`t positive that it was his brother`s voice. So I think this is not going to be proper impeachment because I think it`s consistent with what he said (INAUDIBLE)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Well, let him listen to it.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

GIO BENITEZ, REPORTER: Obviously when you heard those calls -- and I know that you mentioned these -- the cries for help. When you heard those calls and those cries for help, who did you hear crying for help?

JAHVARIS FULTON: I`m not sure. Honestly, I`m not sure. I haven`t really even listened to them that good. But like, I`ve heard it, but -- I mean, I would think it was my brother, but I`m not completely positive.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: So whether he remembered the question as a collateral matter, his answer was the same, had he told the reporter that he wasn`t sure, whatever words were used. So that`s not necessarily -- that`s not impeachment as a collateral matter of what the reporter may have asked. And it did not differ.

O`MARA: And I would renew my request that it be played in front of the jury for a couple reasons. One, his equivocation just now, and two, that the best evidence actually is his own words that he spoke to the reporter, shows his inflection, it shows his hesitation, and rather than having just the colloquy...

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: What is the purpose? Is it for impeachment? Because the court`s finding is it`s not impeachment. Is there another legal basis for playing that recording?

O`MARA: It`s the best evidence of the event that happened back then, your honor. And even if he testified to it now, he`s testifying, quite honestly, in a very different attitude and inquiry...

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: That`s not a legal basis.

O`MARA: I understand the court`s concern.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: OK? So for impeachment purposes, no, it may not be played because his answer is the same today as it was then, so that`s not impeachment. His not remembering the reporter`s question is a collateral matter because it`s not the question that matters it`s the answer that`s given. So your request is -- the objection is sustained.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GRACE: Day nine of the Zimmerman murder trial. What a day in court.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

O`MARA: ... your memory of the question that Mr. Benitez asked you, and I think what you said was you didn`t remember the question specifically, is that correct?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

O`MARA: OK. But leading up to that, we had talked about that you had listened to the tape in the mayor`s office in Sanford, sometime a couple weeks before, would you agree?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

O`MARA: And that was with all the other family members?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

O`MARA: And the civil attorneys representing the family...

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: (INAUDIBLE)

O`MARA: Civil attorneys representing the family, Ben Crump and Natalie Jackson, correct?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

O`MARA: OK. You actually listened to it more than once that day. You listened to it at least twice, correct?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

O`MARA: OK. And it was -- it had been played for other family members more often than twice, right?

JAHVARIS FULTON: I`m unaware of that.

O`MARA: OK. You don`t recall whether or not you had listened to it between the first two times you heard it in the mayor`s office and your conversation with Mr. Benitez?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: (INAUDIBLE)

JAHVARIS FULTON: I don`t remember.

O`MARA: It was, of course, available to you, correct?

JAHVARIS FULTON: What do you mean by available?

O`MARA: Well, at that point, the city of Sanford made the decision to release the calls to the general public, correct?

JAHVARIS FULTON: I don`t know. But I never had the tapes myself.

O`MARA: OK. Did there ever come a time in between the first two times that you heard it and your conversation with Mr. Benitez that you wanted to listen to it again but couldn`t?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Say that again?

O`MARA: OK. In the two-week period between the first two times that you listened to it and the time that you talked to Mr. Benitez about that, during that period of time, did you ever ask someone to listen to it again and be denied?

JAHVARIS FULTON: No.

O`MARA: So in your mind, listening to it the first two times was what you needed to hear, correct?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Not what I needed, but I didn`t want to listen to them again.

O`MARA: OK. And yet your answers earlier remain the same, of course. You said what you said to Mr. Benitez about not being sure who it was on the tape, correct?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

O`MARA: And though you said a moment ago that you didn`t want to listen to it more, you actually have listened to it many more times since, haven`t you?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

O`MARA: OK. Was there a reason why, in between these two first two weeks, you didn`t want to listen to it, but you were OK with listening to it 10 or 15 times afterwards?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes. It`s emotional. I didn`t want to listen to them again.

O`MARA: But you have listened to it at least 10 times since, correct?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes. Well, no, in total 10 times. So if that was two, maybe eight separate occasions.

O`MARA: OK. Now, you said a moment ago that you lived in the house with Sybrina Fulton and Trayvon Martin, correct?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

O`MARA: Tracy was not there living there at that point, though, correct?

JAHVARIS FULTON: No.

O`MARA: So when you say that you consider Tracy Martin to be your dad, he actually left the home a long, long time ago, correct?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

O`MARA: How old were you when he actually left the home?

JAHVARIS FULTON: I was 9 or 10.

O`MARA: And that would put Trayvon at approximately what age, Trayvon Martin?

JAHVARIS FULTON: I was 9, he might have been 5.

O`MARA: You -- the two of you didn`t really hang out together, did you, you and Trayvon Martin?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes. But I mean, it depends what you`re talking about.

O`MARA: OK. You didn`t have the same friends, correct?

JAHVARIS FULTON: No.

O`MARA: So that if you were to go out somewhere, you might go out and do something with your set of friends, and he would go out and do something with his set of friends.

JAHVARIS FULTON: Correct.

O`MARA: Certainly, as brothers, I think you said, you would do things together, whatever that might be, correct, but you didn`t run in the same circles, did you?

JAHVARIS FULTON: No.

O`MARA: You didn`t interact with him on Facebook?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Not really, no.

O`MARA: Nor on Twitter?

JAHVARIS FULTON: No.

O`MARA: But you did interact, of course, with your other friends and -- on those social media sites, correct?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Occasionally, yes.

O`MARA: OK. When Tracy Martin left home, he actually got remarried, didn`t he?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes. Some years later, yes.

O`MARA: And was Trayvon Martin, then, spending a lot of time -- the new wife was Alicia (ph), correct?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

O`MARA: OK. Did you spend a lot of time with your dad over at that house?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

O`MARA: OK. And did Trayvon Martin, as well, spend a lot of time over at that house?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

O`MARA: He was more living there a lot of the time in the last few years, wasn`t he?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Not really.

O`MARA: What do you mean by that?

JAHVARIS FULTON: He -- well, how it went -- let me see, I guess growing up, we usually spent the weekends over there, or whenever we wanted, I guess, we could go over. And towards the end, we -- I don`t know. It was about the same.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN AUDIO CLIP)

GEORGE ZIMMERMAN: This guy looks like he`s up to no good, or he`s on drugs or something.

DISPATCHER: Are you following him?

GEORGE ZIMMERMAN: Yes.

DISPATCHER: OK, we don`t need you to do that.

GEORGE ZIMMERMAN: OK.

911 OPERATOR: So you think he`s yelling help?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Yes.

911 OPERATOR: All right, what is your...

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: There`s gunshots!

911 OPERATOR: You just heard gunshots?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Yes.

911 OPERATOR: How many?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Just one.

(END AUDIO CLIP)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

GUY: Mr. Fulton, you were asked about listening to that 911 call with your brother`s screams on it for the first time at the mayor`s office. Was that emotionally difficult for you to hear?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

GUY: Were you still sort of in denial about your brother`s death at that point?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

GUY: And then you don`t recall listening to that tape again between the time you heard it in the mayor`s office and the interview that you were asked about it, is that what you`re saying?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

GUY: But you did tell the interviewer that you would like to think it`s your brother`s voice, but you weren`t completely positive. Is that what you told him?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

GUY: And then...

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Objection, your honor. Oh, I`m sorry. (INAUDIBLE)

GUY: And then since that time of the interview, you had an opportunity, you said eight, possibly more times to listen to it?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

GUY: Do you now believe it`s Trayvon Martin`s voice yelling for help on the tape?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

GUY: You were asked about growing up. How old were you, approximately, when your mother, Sybrina Fulton, and Tracy Martin divorced?

JAHVARIS FULTON: About 9.

GUY: And as I understood what you said, after that point you primarily lived with your mother, but you would visit Tracy Martin on the weekends?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

GUY: And any other time you wanted to?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

GUY: And would Trayvon go with you to Tracy Martin`s house to visit?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

GUY: You now go to FIU, correct?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

GUY: Where did you go before that? Did you go to a different college?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes, I went to FAMU.

GUY: And where is that located?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Tallahassee.

GUY: All right. When you were at FAMU in Tallahassee, would you come home and stay with your mother and Trayvon Martin?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

GUY: Were there occasions that Trayvon Martin, your brother, went to visit you in Tallahassee when you were in school there?

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

GUY: OK, but back in, I guess the fall of `11, in the first months of 2012, you were actually at FIU back in Miami.

JAHVARIS FULTON: Yes.

GUY: All right. Thank you, sir.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Thank you. May Mr. Fulton be excused?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Yes, ma`am.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Thank you very much, sir. You may be excused.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: George Zimmerman has basically sat there like a lump throughout the whole court proceedings. You know, Zimmerman, he`s got to give the jury something, you know? Even if this entire scenario was unintended -- which I don`t think Zimmerman went out that night intending to commit a murder. I don`t.

Show some sympathy. Show some empathy, for Pete`s sake. Even if the whole thing was a big accident, show some empathy for Trayvon Martin`s family! Please, throw me a bone!

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

GRACE: In the courtroom in the last hours, high drama.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Mr. De La Rionda?

DE LA RIONDA: Your honor, the state will to introduce into evidence state`s exhibit 213, which is a weather report (INAUDIBLE) notice taken, and then also state`s exhibit 193, which is a timeline of the printed (ph) phone calls and the gunshot and the officer (INAUDIBLE) by car.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: OK, based upon the court`s prior rulings, they will be admitted into evidence.

DE LA RIONDA: The state will then announce that we`ll rest our case.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: OK.

O`MARA: Good afternoon, ma`am.

GLADYS ZIMMERMAN, GEORGE ZIMMERMAN`S MOTHER: Good afternoon, Mr. O`Mara.

O`MARA: Tell us your name.

GLADYS ZIMMERMAN: Gladys Zimmerman.

O`MARA: And I know that you would rather not state your address, correct?

GLADYS ZIMMERMAN: Correct.

O`MARA: But tell me, you live in Seminole County?

GLADYS ZIMMERMAN: I live in...

O`MARA: Or in central Florida?

GLADYS ZIMMERMAN: Central Florida, yes.

O`MARA: Thank you. And how long have you lived in central Florida?

GLADYS ZIMMERMAN: Six years.

O`MARA: And of course, you know George Zimmerman, correct?

GLADYS ZIMMERMAN: Yes, sir.

O`MARA: And tell me how -- tell the jury how you know him.

GLADYS ZIMMERMAN: He is my son.

O`MARA: Have you listened to a tape that has the 911 phone call by Ms. Lauer (ph) with screams in the back of it?

GLADYS ZIMMERMAN: Yes, sir.

O`MARA: OK. As I begin that, I`m going to presume that you were around with George most of his life, correct, as he grew up as a child?

GLADYS ZIMMERMAN: Yes, sir.

O`MARA: Had an opportunity to hear him in all different voices, laughing, screaming, yelling, crying?

GLADYS ZIMMERMAN: Yes, sir.

O`MARA: OK. Do you think that you have enough knowledge of his voice that you would be able to tell his voice if you were to hear it?

GLADYS ZIMMERMAN: Yes, sir.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

GRACE: There are many scenarios under which the defense would not call witnesses. I think it`s the old adage, Put up or shut up. They`d better get in there and put something up. And yes, I know the Constitution says there is no burden on the defense. But practically speaking, this is their one swing at the ball, their one bite at the apple. They`d better go for it.

END