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CNN NEWSROOM

Protests Continue in Egypt; Edward Snowden Offered Asylum in Venezuela; Britain Awaits Royal Birth; George Zimmerman Trial Continues; Barbie Doll Gets Body Makeover; Paula Deen Threatened with Blackmail; Marion Bartoli Wins Wimbledon

Aired July 6, 2013 - 10:00   ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

SYBRINA FULTON, TRAYVON MARTIN'S MOTHER: My youngest son is Trayvon Benjamin Martin.

GLADYS ZIMMERMAN, GEORGE ZIMMERMAN'S MOTHER: My son George.

PAMELA BROWN, CNN ANCHOR: It was the testimony of two mothers that electrified the Zimmerman court Friday, but who will the jury believe?

VICTOR BLACKWELL, CNN ANCHOR: Just three days after a coup toppled the government, violence is erupting across Egypt. People are being killed in the streets. The death toll is climbing.

BROWN: And will it be a girl or a boy? Brunet or redhead? We're in full countdown mode for the royal baby.

Hi, good morning, everyone, thank you so much for joining us on NEWSROOM on this Saturday morning. I'm Pamela Brown.

BLACKWELL: And I'm Victor Blackwell. It's 10:00 here on the east coast, 7:00 on the west coast. You are in the CNN NEWSROOM.

Edward Snowden's luck may be changing.

BROWN: Yes, the onetime NSA analyst and current American fugitive now has at least one concrete offer of asylum. If he takes it, Snowden's new life will be in Venezuela. He should feel right at home there given the country's reputation for ticking off the White House. Another possibility for him is Nicaragua, which hinted it's open to granting him asylum as well.

BLACKWELL: But first he'll have to find a way to get to those countries from Moscow's airport. You know he's been there for two weeks. CNN's Rene Marsh is covering the story. Rene, we now have these offers, firm offers from Venezuela, potential offer from Nicaragua. Any comment from the Obama administration?

RENE MARSH, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Well, I will tell you, Victor, Pamela, so far all is quiet here in Washington, D.C., no comment from the White House and no comment so far from the state department on both Venezuela and Nicaragua's offer of asylum to NSA leaker Edward Snowden. Now, the president is spending the holiday weekend at Camp David but it's likely going to be a working vacation, and he's likely following these latest developments.

Now, these two countries making statements on the same day it appears to show a sort of united front against the United States. Several leaders in Latin America, they were angered after recent incident where the president of Bolivia's plane was not allowed through European airspace this week. And because -- that was simply because of suspicions that Snowden may be on board that plane, so they had no clear path to their destination. They were forced to land until it was confirmed that Snowden actually was not on board.

But, of course, that angered Bolivia's president. They blamed the United States for the incident, so lots of angry folks there, including the two that came out just yesterday saying that they would offer Snowden asylum in their country.

BROWN: And on that note, Rene, any idea how Snowden will get from Russia to south America?

MARSH: You know, this is -- this is the big question mark, and there's so many question marks in this story here, but this will not be any easy feat here as far as Snowden goes, because he still has to get out of the transit lounge. We know that. That is believed to be where he is hiding out. Then he's going to need to get on a plane, and he doesn't have the proper travel documents, we know that. His U.S. passport has been suspended, so it's unclear if Venezuela would provide the necessary travel documents.

The expected flight path would be through Cuba. But since there's no direct flights to Venezuela, it's unclear what Cuba would do. Would they turn him over?

But here's the bottom line, despite all the question marks, if he is able to pull this off and if he does indeed make it to Venezuela, at that point there will be nothing that the U.S. can do.

BROWN: All right, Rene Marsh, that sums it up, thank you so much.

BLACKWELL: Let's go to Egypt now. Protesters are gathering again in the capital.

BROWN: They're outraged that the country's first democratically elected president has been tossed out of power by the military. Today's demonstrations so far are calm, but just hours ago, take a look, Egypt's streets looked more like this.

BLACKWELL: A war zone, dozens of people are dead and a thousand or more are injured. And CNN's Reza Sayah is monitoring developments for us in Cairo. Reza, hello.

REZA SAYAH, CNN INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENT: Hi, Victor. What's been incredible about the political conflict is the emotional ups and lows, and today could be another one of those days. This morning was relatively calm but you can really feel the anticipation building and also the crowds building where we are right now, right in front of the headquarters of the presidential guard where these demonstrators believe their ousted president is being held in custody. The individuals, the leaders leading the cheers and the chants here say let's keep things peaceful, however, these same demonstrations where we were yesterday turned violent and deadly.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

SAYAH: Some of the most intense clashes have taken place where we are. That is the front entrance to the social club to the presidential guard. Of course, over the past few days state media reporting that's where the former president, Mohamed Morsy, has been held in custody. So many emotions here. People are angry. They're enraged. They're furious. And then you see people who are somber, who are sitting down with posters of Mohamed Morsy and they're praying. What do you plan to do now? What do you plan to do now?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We are planning to stay here.

SAYAH: What do you want?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We're getting Mohamed Morsy from there.

SAYAH: You want to die, or get him? One of the demonstrators in tears is calling us to come over here. And he's saying this is -- this is the blood, this is the blood of someone who passed away.

Over the past hour, one after another we've seen apache helicopters go up above. Here's another one. Here's another one. Every time, every time, these choppers go up above they get a reaction from the crowd. This is as close as we've gotten to the front line. Here some of the demonstrators sitting down. And there you see some soldiers from the military. And interestingly enough, you see police, police officers, who appear to be absent during the past few days. When Mohamed Morsy needed them, when the Muslim Brotherhood needed them to protect the Muslim Brotherhood headquarters and they weren't there, they are out in force right now with the military protecting this barricade, the entrance to the social club of the presidential guard.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

BROWN: Certainly a volatile situation out there. Dangerous for the protesters, dangerous for our reporters over there covering the stories.

BLACKWELL: Yes. And Reza, is there any fear that this violence will spill over the borders into Israel, clearly a key U.S. ally?

SAYAH: I think there's always concern, Victor, but it's so important to stress that there's absolutely no indication that that's happening right now. You know, the focus and the concern is on Egypt. Domestically, these two sides, this divided country on one side to accomplish the mission of pushing aside this democratically elected president after one year.

Now you have supporters of that president that are digging in saying that this was a violation of the most basic democratic principles, and now we see what today brings, another round of demonstrations. And we're keeping an eye on a funeral procession that's coming here in the next few hours. One of the fatalities that happened here and you can be sure that will escalate tensions as well.

BLACKWELL: And Hosni Mubarak, former president of Egypt, in court today as well. Reza Sayah, thank you very much.

BROWN: A train carrying crude oil headed for Maine exploded sending residents of one town scrambling for safety. Look at this unbelievable video here. Firefighters are battling this massive blaze while authorities worry about an environmental disaster after a train derail in Canada's Quebec province. An affiliate there reports that some of the fuel on this train has actually spilled into a nearby river and there are reports of people missing, but officials people cannot confirm casualties. And we're told by police at least 1,000 people have been evacuated there, so still an unfolding, developing situation.

BLACKWELL: Unbelievable those flames, 80 cars on fire.

You know, Paula Deen just cannot avoid trouble.

BROWN: She can't stay out of the spotlight. But now the heat is on someone else.

BLACKWELL: Yes, besides all of her other issues the FBI has a man in custody who they say tried to blackmail Paula Deen.

BROWN: He threatened to release information about Deen unless he was paid a quarter of a million dollars. Our Jason Carroll is following this story. Jason, good morning to you. What do we know about the threat right now?

JASON CARROLL, CNN CORRESPONDENT: I can tell you it's another sort of strange twist in the story and it's spelled out in the seven-page criminal complaint. Basically this all happened on Friday when FBI agents arrested Thomas Paculis and charged him in what is this alleged extortion scheme.

And I want to show you a picture of him. He's 62 years old. There he is. Investigators say five days after Deen's now infamous deposition, you remember that one. That's the one where she admitted to using the "n" word. Paculis then apparently sent an e-mail to Deen's lawyer demanding money. He allegedly threatened to divulge information about Deen using the "n" word at her restaurant in Georgia.

One of the e-mails that he sent reads, "The statements are true and damning enough that the case will be won on its merit alone. As always there is a price for such information. You can contact me here if you feel that it is necessary or I can go public and we will see what happens then."

The criminal complaint says Deen's lawyer and Paculis exchanged e- mails and telephone calls. Eventually an amount of $250,000 was agreed upon. Paculis then allegedly sent another e-mail to a different attorney saying "The burning question is, do you want in. I still have the chance to bring this together, but time is slowly running out. I have them hooked, but reeling this sucker in is going to be hard without help. Give me a call." Investigators showed Deen pictures of Paculis. She told them she did not recognize him or his name. Before these extortion allegations came to light Deen's son came to their mother's defense on CNN.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

BOBBY DEEN, SON OF PAULA DEEN: Our mother is not the picture that's being painted. It's not -- well, look, life's not fair. It's inaccurate what people are saying about her. It's inaccurate. And the people that know us, know that this is untruthful. And I think in the end it's going to work itself out.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CARROLL: We'll see. Paculis used to live in Georgia but now she lives in upstate New York. He appeared before a federal judge on Friday and was released on bond. His next court date is scheduled for July 16th. We should also tell you that CNN did attempt to reach Paculis for comment by phone and by e-mail. neither were returned. But Paculis, at least according to the seven-page criminal complaint, I read through it, he might be in a bit of trouble.

BROWN: I would say so. Jason Carroll live for us in New York. Thank you.

BLACKWELL: Let's go to Florida now where the George Zimmerman case is in recess for the weekend.

BROWN: Yesterday the mothers of both Trayvon Martin and George Zimmerman took the stand, each talking about what they heard on a critical 911 call made the night Trayvon Martin was killed.

BLACKWELL: Let's bring in CNN legal correspondent Jean Casarez. Jean, it's I guess a coincidence, maybe it was planned, who knows, that both mothers were on the stand on the same day. But what do you take away from their testimony?

JEAN CASAREZ, CNN LEGAL CORRESPONDENT: Do you know the amazing thing to just really think about this for a minute and step back. As you know, this is a jury of all women, six women will be deliberating this case, five of the six women are mothers, one of them is a mother of eight children. So all of these mothers were sitting and listening to the testimony of the two mothers in the case yesterday. It's extraordinary. It really is.

And I wonder how much substantive testimony came from them versus the emotional impact of them being on the stand. I mean, the jury heard from Sybrina Fulton and the jury now knows she's worked for the county of Miami-Dade for 24 years. She's a college graduate majoring in English, and she said she heard her son yelling, she even said screaming. But we didn't hear examples of that and she knew it was her son's voice.

And then the mother of George Zimmerman, it's interesting. The defense didn't ask her background so the jury does not know she was a clerk of the courts for her entire career. But they just know that she testified as a mother the horror and the terror that she heard on that voice was her son's.

So, the defense wanted the jury to just look at the evidence and determine for themselves who was crying and screaming out on that tape, and that may be the end result of all of this.

BROWN: And you mentioned there both mothers said that is my son in that tape. Was there one mother from your perspective that was more convincing that might have helped either the defense or the state?

CASAREZ: You know, with Sybrina Fulton, what the defense brought out on cross examination it was at the mayor's office, there was a room filled with eight people, her attorney, her former husband and other people associated to the family all listening to the tape at the same time. And the jury heard from the senior audio engineer of the FBI that you don't do it like that. That you do a blind study, meaning somebody is alone listening to the tape so they don't have the influence of others in determining who they believe is the one screaming on the tape. So, it was probably diluted, the impact evidentiary-wise. But, still, the jury has to be thinking about these two women this weekend.

BROWN: Certainly the emotional impact of those two mothers will definitely, you know, I think influence the juries in some ways. As you said, Jean, five of the six are mothers.

BLACKWELL: Yes, and they connect. We'll talk more about this at the bottom of the hour. Jean Casarez, thank you very much.

CASAREZ: Thanks.

BROWN: And coming up here in out NEWSROOM, new leads in a six-year-old case.

BLACKWELL: Yes, Madeleine McCann disappeared while on vacation with her parents. Do you remember this face? We'll tell you why police say she could still be alive.

Plus --

BROWN: This week police found out that Aaron Hernandez had a second home, but who told police about it?

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

BLACKWELL: There are new leads in a six-year-old cold case.

BROWN: British police now say they think this little girl right here, Madeleine McCann, well, they think she might still be alive. She was just three when she disappeared at her family's vacation home in Portugal. CNN's Nick Valencia joins us with the very latest on this story. Nick, we've had promising leads in this case before, but this seems a little bit different. Do we know what evidence the police have?

NICK VALENCIA, CNN CORRESPONDENT: I spoke to the metropolitan police department in the U.K. earlier this morning, and they told me that this new evidence, these new leads is a result of combing over more than 30,000 pages of documents related to the case. This is, of course, welcome news for the parents. That investigation originally was launched in 2007 when Madeleine McCann went missing. It hit a dead end, and in 2008 it was stopped.

That led the McCanns to appeal to the U.K. government asking the prime minister for support. They got it. And two years later they now uncover 38 persons of interest, people that were in Portugal at the time Madeleine McCann went missing. But, of course, the big headline in this all is that police believe that she may still be alive. Pamela?

BLACKWELL: You know, Nick, there's been this photograph that we've seen and we just showed it of this little girl, a really young child kind of moving her blond hair out of her face, but this girl has grown. It's been six years now. There's a new photo, right?

VALENCIA: Yes. They've put out a new photo. They've advanced the age to represent what she may look like now. This is her, Madeleine McCann, at 10 years old. She would have celebrated her tenth birthday in May. This has been a very difficult time for her parents, the last six years, and they spoke about that last year at a press conference to the media where they talked about their two other children and how they're dealing with it.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

KATE MCCANN, MADELEINE MCCANN'S MOTHER: I don't really want them to have the burden of this, of having to keep looking and looking and looking and not being able to stop, you know? So, we need to find her now.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

VALENCIA: Now, Victor, the parents themselves they have not escaped criticism. They were at one time listed as suspects in the investigation in Portugal. They were, of course, cleared, but a lot of people asking the questions why they would leave their three children alone while they went off to dinner. That sliding glass door was left ajar allowing them to get in and out easily, and they believe, the parents believe, that a perpetrator may have entered that apartment resort and kidnapped their little girl. They're hoping this new U.K. investigation leads to new evidence and uncovers new leads.

BROWN: We are all hoping for that. Nick Valencia, thank you so much for that report.

VALENCIA: You bet.

BLACKWELL: So many years and you think that when there are new elements, maybe some new evidence, we cover it. But they, as you said, look and look and look day after day.

BROWN: Don't give up. As I'm sure all parents would feel the same way if that was their child.

BLACKWELL: Yes. And hopefully they find her.

New England Patriots tight end Aaron Hernandez has been in spotlight since being arrested to murder last week.

BROWN: But away from that spotlight police have turned to a man much less known. He may have an important story to tell about the night that Odin Lloyd was killed. Susan Candiotti has more on this.

SUSAN CANDIOTTI, CNN NATIONAL CORRESPONDENT: Victor and Pamela, as potentially incriminating evidence mounts against former New England Patriot Aaron Hernandez, new questions arise about a man that may be playing a key role in the investigation.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

CANDIOTTI: Not much is known about Carlos Ortiz, but what we know is intriguing. The district attorney identifies Ortiz as one of two men in a car with accused murderer Aaron Hernandez the night Odin Lloyd was gunned down execution-style.

BILL MCCAULEY, ASSISTANT DISTRICT ATTORNEY, BRISTOL COUNTY: It was a conversation that occurred in the car when he gets into an argument with the victim.

CANDIOTTI: How might investigators know about what went on in the car? A law enforcement source tells CNN Ortiz is cooperating with authorities but won't go further.

PAUL CALLAN, CNN LEGAL ANALYST: If Ortiz is a cooperating witness, that's a big, big break for prosecutors.

CANDIOTTI: Ortiz for now faces only an illegal weapons charge for allegedly telling police he was carrying a gun the day Lloyd was murdered. Ortiz pleaded not guilty to the gun charge. His attorney declined comment to CNN.

According to a search warrant, Ortiz told police the day after Lloyd's murder, he and Hernandez drove to this two bedroom apartment. Police called it a flop house. Documents show the football player leased it almost 20 miles from his luxury home, no explanation why. A neighbor says she barely saw the famous renter.

CAROL BAILEY, NEIGHBOR: No suspicious activity, no girls, no -- nothing other than just typical guy stuff, you know? A little bit of loud. A little bit loud. A little bit of cigarette smoke. A little bit of maybe pot, but nothing that you wouldn't expect from a bunch of guys.

CANDIOTTI: Hernandez has pleaded not guilty.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

CANDIOTTI: Hernandez's troubles don't end there. In nearby Boston, police are examining an SUV registered to the former tight end. Discovered last week, sources say that SUV might be involved in an unsolved drive-by-double murder last summer. As for Lloyd's murder, CNN has learned a grand jury is already calling witnesses, some scheduled to appear within the next two weeks. Pamela and Victor?

BROWN: Thank you so much, Susan.

BLACKWELL: Patriots fans looking to unload their Aaron Hernandez jerseys have plenty of options. You can trade it in for free, but you might get a bigger payoff if you keep it.

BROWN: And Barbie's bikini body looking a little rounder than it used to, right, Victor?

BLACKWELL: Yes, indeed.

BROWN: It's the American icon reimagined.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

BROWN: Welcome back, everyone. Let's talk some business, shall we?

BLACKWELL: Let's do that. Aaron Hernandez arrested and charged with murder. Now I know after you say let's talk business, that's not what you expect us to say.

BROWN: No.

BLACKWELL: But, listen, New England patriots cut him from the team about an hour after he was arrested. His jerseys, the Hernandez jerseys, were 81 and 85, and fans who have jerseys can now exchange them for a new one.

BROWN: Others are trying to make a quick buck off of this, though. They're selling the jerseys online and they're actually getting bids as high as $1,000. Can you believe that?

BLACKWELL: Hence being in the business segment.

BROWN: Exactly.

BLACKWELL: You were looking online and saying some of the people are bidding but not because they actually want the jerseys.

BROWN: That's right, they're bidding but they're not paying. And basically it's their way of making a point of this, saying, look, you shouldn't be trying to make money off of this. This guy is arrested for murder. Why are you selling his jersey?

BLACKWELL: But should anyone be surprised really --

BROWN: No, this is what everyone will do, to try to make money. Exactly.

We were talking about the royal baby earlier --

BLACKWELL: Yes, golden potties.

BROWN: Any opportunity to make money, people will do it. But in this case they're not making any money off of it so far at least. BLACKWELL: No.

BROWN: Let's talk about something else. This is something that Victor and I have been sort of arguing.

BLACKWELL: This one got me in trouble earlier today. You go ahead and launch it.

BROWN: Barbie is not exactly -- I can say this.

BLACKWELL: You want me to do the one word?

BROWN: Do it. Take over.

BLACKWELL: Anatomically.

BROWN: There we go. I said it earlier. Well, she's not anatomically correct it turns out, no big surprise here. But if Barbie was a real life size woman she wouldn't even be able to function.

BLACKWELL: Poor Barbie.

BROWN: Take a look at this break down from Rehab.com. Barbie's next would be twice as long and six inches thinner than the average woman. She wouldn't even be able to hold her head up.

BLACKWELL: Yes, a 16-inch waist here. She has room for half a liver, a few inches of intestine. She has six-inch ankles, imagine that, a child size three foot, and poor Barbie would have to walk around on all fours. Now --

BROWN: Here we go.

BLACKWELL: -- this is the normal Barbie if Barbie were, quote-unquote, "normal." You she her on the right, she's a little bit more voluptuous. The word I used earlier was "thick." And it's a good thing, now you thought that I meant thick as in --

BROWN: Fat.

BLACKWELL: No. No. See this side shot is what I'm talking about.

BROWN: She has more meat on her bones. She looks great.

BLACKWELL: She looks really good.

BROWN: Nikolai Lam of MyDeals.com used a measurements from the CDC of a typical 19-year-old woman and this is what he came up with right here. So we asked him why did you do this? He said, "I created normal Barbie because I want to show that average is beautiful."

BLACKWELL: It is indeed.

BROWN: "And I think it sets a positive example."

BLACKWELL: I call her Barbara. BROWN: Barbara. The normal -- Barbara the thicker version.

BLACKWELL: Yes, and that's a good thing, though. We talked about it, I'm telling her, I had given her the off-camera definition of thick.

BROWN: He did.

BLACKWELL: I think you at home understand exactly what I'm talking about.

BROWN: We'll see if Mattel tarts making the normal Barbara.

All right, well, a daring rescue by people you've never met. We're going to have the story behind this video right here just ahead after this break. Stay with us.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

BLACKWELL: Welcome back to the George Zimmerman trial now. And it was a day we saw the mothers on the stand in the courtroom yesterday. Trayvon Martin's mother and George Zimmerman's mother were both called to the stand each. They were asked to talk about their sons and to identify the voices on a critical 911 recording.

Joining me now is attorney Tom Mesereau and Wendy Murphy, law professor and former prosecutor. I want to play a little bit of the cross-examination of Trayvon's mother first, and then we'll talk on the other side. Listen.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: You certainly had to hope that was your son screaming even before you heard it, correct?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I didn't hope for anything. I just simply listened to the tape.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: And in your mind as his mother, there was no doubt whatsoever that it was him screaming, correct?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Absolutely.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

BLACKWELL: Tom, I think everyone knows where Mark O'Mara was trying to go with that, is that in her mind no matter what she heard it was going to be Trayvon because she wanted it to be Trayvon, and that comes through preparation. Is it about what Sybrina Fulton said or her emotion on the stand in front of those jurors?

TOM MESEREAU, CRIMINAL DEFENSE ATTORNEY: I think it's a little of both. I don't think these jurors are going to hold anything against either of these mothers for what they said. Both support their sons in their own way. Both believe they're telling the truth. I don't see anyone holding anything against either of these witnesses. The question is, is Zimmerman going to be held responsible for a situation he appears to have created? He went to the location. He carried a gun with him, a deadly weapon for which he's responsible. He ignored the police when they said step back. He ignored the homeowner association rules, which were you do not confront. That's going to be the ultimate question.

I don't know if it's going to be second-degree murder. I don't know if it's going to be a lesser offense like manslaughter. But the key question will be should he be held responsible? And I think these mothers' testimonies will be accepted, appreciated, understood. Nothing will be held against either of these two mothers.

BLACKWELL: Wendy, let me play Gladys Zimmerman on the stand and then I've got a question for you out of it.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Were you able to hear that voice in the background?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Yes, sir. Yes.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: You heard, of course, a woman's voice in the foreground, correct?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Yes, sir.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Do you know whose voice that was screaming in the background?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Yes, sir.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: And whose voice was that?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: My son George.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: And are you certain of that?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Because he's my son.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

BLACKWELL: Any advantage for one mother or does one mother offer to one side or the other, Wendy?

WENDY MURPHY, FORMER PROSECUTOR: Well, you know, I agree with Tom that there's a great deal of sympathy for both moms, and in an ordinary case I'd say they strike each other out. But I do think George Zimmerman's mother gets a thumb on the scale in her advantage because objective other witnesses support that she's correct that the voice was that of George Zimmerman.

And the support, the corroboration, if you will, from an uninterested third party who says, look, the screams were coming from the guy on the ground. The guy on the ground was wearing a red jacket. It is undisputed that the guy on the ground in the red jacket was George Zimmerman. He's also the one with injuries, so the objective corroborative evidence lends extra weight to George Zimmerman's mom. In this contest of moms on the question who really was screaming on the tape, I think she prevails.

BLACKWELL: But, Wendy, they will have to balance that with when the shot was fired the screaming stopped, and that would lead itself to the person who was screaming was the person who was shot. I mean, they're going to have to make a decision between the mothers listening to a tape and what is actually on that tape that the screaming stops when the shot is fired.

MURPHY: Yes. Do you know what, Victor, I think that cuts both ways. If the screaming stopped, it's because either George Zimmerman no longer felt threatened or if it was Trayvon Martin, then the screaming stopped because he was dead. I don't think you get much out of that analysis.

And, you know, I agree with Tom that they're going to ask really tough questions and they're going to debate seriously whether Trayvon Martin bears responsibility for any of this. But at the end of the day, if they believe that George Zimmerman was screaming and that he had a right under Florida law to defend himself because he reasonably feared not just death but serious bodily harm, and most people would say with those injuries he at least feared serious bodily harm, then he had an absolute right to defend himself with lethal force. I think that will be their focus.

BLACKWELL: Hey, Tom, I want to ask you about one of the witnesses who there has not been a lot of discussion about, and that is Jahvaris Fulton, Trayvon Martin's brother. He initially said he wasn't sure, and then later he said, yes, it is his brother. I want to kind of take it away from the content and actually talk about the style. Seeing him there, juxtaposed to Rachel Jeantel, this young man very articulate, very elegant, he has been described. And the jurors seeing Rachel Jeantle, maybe that's the kind of teenager that Trayvon Martin was, or is he more like his brother? What will the presentation of Jahvaris Fulton mean to this jury?

MESEREAU: Well, there's a factual component in a trial and there's an emotional component, and people are governed by conscious and subconscious issues within themselves. We don't know what biases these jurors will bring to the courtroom, but I do have to -- I do believe that he humanized the situation. He humanized Trayvon. And I think this jury is going to have a lot to think about when it comes to the Martin family, the loss of this child, and that's really what he was.

And, you know, there's a lot going on here that is going to be the subject of tremendous discussion in the jury room. You know, there was -- there's discussion about whether or not Trayvon grabbed his gun or not. Well, you don't grab a gun unless you see a gun. Why do you see a gun? Because George Zimmerman brought a gun to the location. Should he have? I see no reason why he should have.

Even if Trayvon got into a scuffle with him and even if Trayvon tried to grab his gun, if George Zimmerman stalked me and pulled a gun on me, I would try to grab it, too. So there's going to be a lot of discussion about who really set in motion the chain of events that resulted in death.

But in answer to your question, certainly the Martin family has brought a very human side to the equation, has brought emotion, and tragedy into this courtroom. This is a horrible loss. And I think the jury's going to have to really take into account who's responsible for setting in motion this tragedy. And I don't think it was Trayvon.

BLACKWELL: All right, Tom Mesereau, Wendy Murphy, thank you. Testimony resumes Monday at 9:00 a.m. eastern.

BROWN: Well, this is an incredible story. It's out of China and it really is a miracle. Take a look at this. A 15-month-old baby pulled from the rubble of a house that collapsed in a landslide. The infant was buried alive for seven hours. Officials discovered her cradle by her grandmother, who was killed. Her body was crushed against concrete and beams, but there was enough room for her granddaughter to survive.

And talk about beating the odds. A woman in Prague falls off a subway platform onto the tracks just as a train entering the station rolls over her. Look at this. Somehow she survived. Police say she fell into a deep groove between the subway rails avoiding the impact of the train. The woman walked away unscathed and she told police she just felt, quote, tired. Wow. Talk about luck.

And another fall on the tracks, this time in Atlanta. An apparently intoxicated man tumbled onto train tracks. Several bystanders immediately jumped into action forming a human chain to pull him to safety. We're told the man is OK, but he's been charged with reckless conduct and public drunkenness. Amazing to see how everyone came to his rescue there.

BLACKWELL: Why are people just falling onto the tracks?

BROWN: I don't know.

BLACKWELL: It seems like we've seen several of these.

BROWN: There are several examples in New York City.

BLACKWELL: At least the good news is we're seeing the rescues and we're seeing people pulled out. But we're seeing so many people falling onto the train tracks.

BROWN: Or pushes others onto the train tracks.

BLACKWELL: Trains aren't new. Perhaps they'll put in some safety or security measures.

BROWN: There's been talk about that but, of course, it will be costly.

BLACKWELL: The world awaits, the newest addition to the British royal family. We'll talk about what life will be from someone that grew up inside the palace.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK) BROWN: We have a women's final winner at Wimbledon. Today's final featured two players, Sabine Lisicki of Germany and Marion Bartoli of France, who had never won a Grand Slam event. Amanda Davis is live for us from Wimbledon.

AMANDA DAVIS, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Hi, Pamela. Yes, it is the 15th seed Marion Bartoli who has just been crowned the 2013 Wimbledon ladies champion. She is celebrating on center court just behind me, having been handed the Venus Rosewater dish, her first grand slam title as you said. She beat Savine Lisicki 6-1, 6-4 in really a more one sided final than we've possibly been exacting. Bartoli had been in the final here once before back in 2007. She barely made an impact there and was definitely trying to make amends for that today. Her first title since 2011, and what a title.

BROWN: I would say. Amanda Davis at Wimbledon, thank you so much for that. Victor?

BLACKWELL: Royal baby watch 2013, are you ready? We're heading to London where the country awaits their future king or queen.

BROWN: But first, making it through an intense cross fit routine is no cakewalk for anyone. But imagine you have muscle coordination problems and impaired motor function because of cerebral palsy. Dr. Sanjay Gupta has a story of a woman who despite all those odds is meeting cross fit head-on.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

DR. SANJAY GUPTA, CNN CHIEF MEDICAL CORRESPONDENT: Cattle bells, pull- ups, sit-ups, squats, just completing a cross fit workout is impressive for anyone. But for Steph Hammerman, the feat is more than impressive, it once was unconceivable.

STEPH HAMMERMAN, ADAPTIVE ATHLETE: I was born three months premature. I lost a lot of oxygen and a bunch of blood through that process.

GUPTA: Steph has cerebral palsy, and that develops because of trauma to the brain during or after birth. People with the condition are often unsteady on their feet, they have impaired motor function and muscle coordination problems, and all of this could make cross fit training dangerous. But for Steph it's just another obstacle to overcome.

HAMMERMAN: All of my other brothers and sisters are completely able- bodied, and growing up in that world there was no other way to live.

GUPTA: She was always active, but the inevitable freshman 15 in college made her really want to get in shape.

HAMMERMAN: So, I found a gym. I walked in. I said, I want to become stronger. I hear cross-fit's awesome. Would I be able to do this?

GUPTA: Within an hour she was hitting the mats. With each push-up, she got stronger, with each pull-up, more intense.

HAMMERMAN: I'm determined to prove not only to the world but to myself that I'm good enough to do this.

GUPTA: Not only is she good enough to do it, she's now good enough to coach.

HAMMERMAN: Fight for it, guys, let's go.

GUPTA: Earlier this year she became the world's first certified cross fit trainer with cerebral palsy.

HAMMERMAN: There's no reason in this world that people have to say they can't do something. If somebody really wants to do something, they're going to find a way to make this work.

GUPTA: Dr. Sanjay Gupta, CNN, reporting.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

BROWN: Welcome back, everyone. London's St. Mary's hospital getting ready for the royal birth. Prince William and his wife Catherine preparing to welcome their baby any day now. And if that hospital doorway looks familiar, that's because it's the same wing where both William and Harry were born.

So, what lies ahead for the prince or princess, that's the big question. Victoria Arbiter joins us from New York. She's a royal commentator for CNN. Victoria, you offer an interesting perspective here because you actually sort of grew up in Kensington Palace. Tell me, from your experience what will it be like for William and Kate's baby growing up royal?

VICTORIA ARBITER, CNN ROYAL COMMENTATOR: Kensington palace is a very lovely location, it's near high street and Kate likes to pop down to go shopping and it's on the edge of Kensington Garden, and there's a large park on the far end is a pirate playground, there's a big pirate ship which is a playground in memory of Diana, princess of Wales. And I'm sure William will like to take the baby up there.

To give it some perspective it's like a Melrose place sort of idea, that the Duke and Duchess of Kent, the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester, Prince and Princess Michael of Kent, and Prince Harry all live there, it's a little community but it feels very homely although it's in the center of London.

BROWN: Being a royal is anything but normal, but it has been reported that Kate actually wants a normal childhood for her baby. But let's be real, is that going to happen?

ARBITER: Really, yes, William and Kate are very keen to have their child as normal a childhood as it is possible to have as members of the royal family. You have to remember that Kate grew up in a house when her mother was waiting for her when she came home from school, and she'll be keen to emulate that to the best of her ability with this child. The fact that they haven't hired a nanny is quite telling in terms of how hands-on they want to be. It is inevitable at some stage they'll have to have a nanny simply because royal work will be calling.

But I think certainly in the beginning if they need anyone to watch the baby they'll be calling on Grandma Middleton for the time being, and they hope to enjoy time with their baby early in childhood as much as possible. And really the fact that William is only second in line to the throne means the pressure isn't on him like it was with Charles when he was a baby.

BROWN: And on that note, how would you say the royal baby's life will be different from William's childhood?

ARBITER: Generations and expectations change. Yes, Diana is largely credited with sort of changing the face of the royal childhood, but the generations and times then allowed it to be different. And I think William will be keen to have things as relaxed as possible for this child, but we live in a multimedia age, and I think it will be very difficult for him given that every member of the public has a camera phone these days. It's 30 seconds someone sees Kate in Starbucks ordering a coffee, that picture is up on Twitter. So the public has almost become more of a hindrance that the paparazzi, and that's a road that William's going to have to navigate.

BROWN: You wonder what the whole experience is like for Kate being pregnant, going through this. I have to ask, Victoria, before it was announced the duchess were pregnant, the laws were changed over who can take the throne. Tell us what that means and why this is so important.

ARBITER: Well, historically, historians and feminists are hoping desperately that this child is a girl because of these changes in the laws to succession that have been pushed forward, meaning if William and Kate have a daughter first, she will take precedence in the future when it comes to taking over the throne from any younger brothers. And really this is very significant. We will have had King Charles, we would have had King William. People are certainly hoping that we will have a queen. Historically women have done very well in the top job. But since 1066 we've only had six queens.

So, I think really it's very exciting, the prospect of having a girl. It means that really we can see are archaic laws pushed to the side and see a very modern future for the monarchy, which is what is wonderful about the monarchy. It's constantly evolving and developing.

BROWN: Very exciting indeed, Victoria, thank you so much.

ARBITER: Thank you very much.

BLACKWELL: Staying fit when you're 90, not 19, 90 -- nine-zero. No problem for this Indiana man. He has a secret to staying young and he's anxious to share it.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

BLACKWELL: So, this cutie, if you can use that adjective, is Gladys, five-month-old western lowland gorilla living at the Cincinnati Zoo. She's exploring the yard with her family here for the first time. BROWN: And Gladys, well, she's that being raised by surrogate parents, a mother and daughter team of gorillas who are taking over from the humans who raised her. You can see all three of them at the Cincinnati zoo. I think "cutie" is a safe way to describe it or Gladys. I think she's adorable.

BLACKWELL: I'll let you have it.

This is one I wanted to see. Out of all the videos on the web we picked out the one you have to see this morning. This one is about fitness. Before you roll your eyes, trust me, this clip will get you motivated to get you to work out. This is the puppy workout created by Fitness Blender who posted this video online. Canine crunches, Labrador lunges, Shih-Tzu squats.

BROWN: That's pretty clever. My dog wouldn't put up with it.

BLACKWELL: Explain that.

BROWN: He's a Lhasa-poodle mix. He would not put up with it.

This is an amazing video here. A sideline interview was turning a sports reporter into a viral headline. Amy Campbell was covering a high school recruiting event when she got bowled over during a play. Check it out.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: A kid like Cameron Robinson -- oh.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

BROWN: Every time I see that I cringe.

BLACKWELL: Here it is.

BROWN: Replay. Slow mow. Here we go.

BLACKWELL: Boom, right to the shoulder. Oh, man, she said her knee was bruised when wide receiver lane collided with her. Afterward this is what she tweeted. Emon Lane taught me yesterday that maybe I do need insurance.

BROWN: And maybe a helmet.

BLACKWELL: And back up a little bit.

BROWN: I can't believe she only injured her knee. I thought it would be worse than that.

BLACKWELL: Eddie Winters, you have to watch this. He's 90 years young, and the way he stays that way is roller skating. You can find Mr. Winters every Thursday night at Skate Land. Couples skate. He said skating is the key to living because it gets him moving, and Eddie Winters just keeps rolling along in style. I love this.

BROWN: I do, too, 90 young.

BLACKWELL: My first time on roller skates -- wow. He's going backwards.

BROWN: He's got dance moves.

BLACKWELL: Is that him?

BROWN: I was about to say.

BLACKWELL: Wait a second. Come on, now, at 90 years old he's going backwards. Mr. Winters, clearly I missed something.

BROWN: All right, well, on that note that will do it for us today. That was inspiring for a moment for me, too.

BLACKWELL: I'm not doing what I'm supposed to be doing if Mr. Winters is --

FREDRICKA WHITFIELD, CNN ANCHOR: Oh, my god, you don't want to see me a roller skates.

BLACKWELL: Me neither.

WHITFIELD: But that was great, nonetheless, that was very inspiring. You have a great day. Did you say good-bye? Did I barge in on your conversation?

BROWN: No. You take it.

BLACKWELL: No we're done you're going to take it, you take it.

WHITFIELD: All right. Have a good one.

BLACKWELL: You, too.

WHITFIELD: Thanks, Pam and Victor.