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CNN NEWSROOM

Live Coverage of the Zimmerman Trial

Aired July 8, 2013 - 14:00   ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


MARK O'MARA, ZIMMERMAN DEFENSE ATTORNEY: Had been arrested?

DET. CHRIS SERINO, LEAD INVESTIGATOR IN THE CASE: Yes, sir.

O'MARA: OK. And were you sharing with them your progress, and what was done and what still needed to be done?

SERINO: Yes, sir.

O'MARA: And can you outline the setting, where you were when you had this conversation with the two of them?

SERINO: We conducted a meeting in the conference room that we have in the police department on the second floor. And I - and after that I went ahead and played the 911 recordings for him.

O'MARA: OK. Do you recall where that recording -- playing of that recording took place?

SERINO: It was at my desk.

O'MARA: OK. And that was, as testified to by a previous officer, sort of a cubby hole setup with two or three other desks in the close proximity?

SERINO: Yes, sir.

O'MARA: And can you then tell the jury how that was set up, where you were sitting, where Mr. Martin was sitting, if he was, and where Miss Green was sitting?

SERINO: OK. I was seated in front of my desk facing my computer monitor. Mr. Martin was to my rear left. And next to him was his girlfriend or fiancee, Brandy. And kind of like in that posture.

O'MARA: OK. So if I'm sitting at my screen right here, you were sitting down?

SERINO: Yes, sir.

O'MARA: Tracy Martin, then, was just over your left shoulder?

SERINO: Yes, sir.

O'MARA: And then Brandy Green just behind or next to him?

SERINO: Yes, sir.

O'MARA: OK. And what was the focus at that point?

SERINO: The audio portions of the recording that was played on my computer.

O'MARA: OK. We know -- and I want to focus you on what we have shorthand called the Lauer (ph) 911 call. Do you understand what I mean by that?

SERINO: Yes, sir.

O'MARA: And that is the call that has the screams on it and the gunshot?

SERINO: Yes, sir.

O'MARA: And did you play that for Mr. Martin and Miss Green?

SERINO: Yes, sir, I played all the recordings for him.

O'MARA: OK. Focusing on the 911 call we just talked about, the Lauer 911 call, tell me how you played that, what volume or how the setting of that occurred.

SERINO: I can't recall the number as far as the volume went, but it was audible, relatively clear, as clear as I had. It was played off of a - I believe off of a CD. It might have been digital, e-mail. I don't quite remember. But it was played. And it was audible.

O'MARA: OK. And what was Mr. Martin's response?

SERINO: Emotional. Understandably so. And I let him listen first.

O'MARA: I'm sorry?

SERINO: I let him listen first before I asked anything.

O'MARA: OK. And what did you ask him?

SERINO: I - I believe my words were, "is that your son's voice in the background?" or something - I think I said it a little differently than that, but I inquired as if that was, in fact, his son yelling for help.

O'MARA: And what was his response?

SERINO: He -- it was more of a verbal and nonverbal. He looked away, and under his breath, as I interpreted it, said "no."

O'MARA: Did he ever ask that the tape be played for him again at that time?

SERINO: I don't believe so.

O'MARA: Did he ever evidence to you any concern with being able to hear the tape?

SERINO: No, sir.

O'MARA: Had that occurred, would you have simply played the tape for him a second time?

SERINO: Absolutely, sir.

O'MARA: And Miss Green, what was her response?

SERINO: She was consoling him. I didn't hear a response from her.

O'MARA: Did you ask her specifically whether or not she believed it to be Trayvon Martin's voice?

SERINO: No, sir, I did not.

O'MARA: Did she offer any opinion voluntarily as to whether or not she believed it was Trayvon Martin's voice?

SERINO: Not that I recall, no, sir.

O'MARA: Do you know who else was present in the area sort of nearby within, let's say, earshot of the playing of the call?

SERINO: One of our sergeants was behind us. He was walking through and I guess he saw what I was doing and he took it upon himself to stop. And I believe that was the only person that I saw.

O'MARA: Do you recall what that sergeant's name was?

SERINO: Sergeant Leon Seesla (ph).

O'MARA: OK.

Nothing further, your honor.

JUDGE DEBRA NELSON, SEMINOLE COUNTY, FLORIDA: You may cross (ph).

BERNIE DE LA RIONDA, PROSECUTOR: Good afternoon, sir.

SERINO: Good afternoon, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: Let's talk about the last thing you mentioned. Sergeant Seesla was walking by or you believe stopped, is that correct?

SERINO: Yes. No, he stopped, yes.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. And detective or Investigator Singleton (ph) wasn't around, as best you can recall, is that correct?

SERINO: No, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: She was not, correct?

SERINO: No, I didn't see her there. DE LA RIONDA: OK. Now, I assume by the nature of your profession that this is one of the most difficult things you have to do?

SERINO: By far, sir, yes, it is.

DE LA RIONDA: To have to talk about the death of a loved one to a parent.

SERINO: Yes, sir, it was.

DE LA RIONDA: Is there anything more difficult that you have to deal with as an investigator in a case involving the death of a person?

SERINO: Other than the initial notification, probably not.

DE LA RIONDA: And I gather you tried to, as best you can, to be as sensitive as you can, realizing the -- how sensitive this issue is or how traumatic an event it can be, correct?

SERINO: Yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: And did you attempt to do that as best you could?

SERINO: Yes, sir, I did.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. I gather you informed Trayvon Martin's dad that you were going to have him listen to some recordings?

SERINO: Yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. Did you tell him ahead of time that there would actually be a shot? In other words, that he would actually listen to the death of his son, in other words? Did you tell him ahead of time?

SERINO: I don't recall specifically informing him of that, no.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. But you played - I think you said five or six 911 calls, is that correct?

SERINO: Everyone that I had, yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. And at this time do you recall the order or how you played them, other than you played them all?

SERINO: I don't recall the order, but, yes, sir, I played them all.

DE LA RIONDA: And would you agree that some of those recordings, such as Mr. (INAUDIBLE) was gut-wrenching, in other words, for a parent to have to listen to when they're talking about the death of their son?

SERINO: Yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. They were pretty emotional?

SERINO: Yes, sir. DE LA RIONDA: And would you agree that Mr. Martin's reaction was appropriate in the sense of having to relive that, even though he wasn't there, but having to, again, understand that his son was no longer among us? In other words, that his son was dead, in heaven, hopefully?

SERINO: Yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. And would you agree that he reacted appropriately to that?

SERINO: Yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: So you played the recording in which Mr. Diak (ph) is -- and the jury's listened to it, so I'm not going to play it again - where she's describing the death of this kid, or describing what she heard, whatever it was, is that correct?

SERINO: Yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: And then you're playing other recordings in which other people are describing what they saw, correct?

SERINO: Yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. And I gather, as you're playing this, Mr. Martin's getting very emotional, would that be fair?

SERINO: Yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: Was he having a hard time dealing with this?

SERINO: In my opinion, yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. And I gather he didn't say, hey, hold on, you know, this is too difficult for me, let me come back another day. He went ahead and said, I'm going to listen to everything, because he wanted to know what was going on in the case. Would that be fair?

SERINO: Yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: And from your perspective, that was very understandable, correct?

SERINO: Absolutely. Yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: I mean his son has been killed, what, two days earlier, correct?

SERINO: Yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: And he's wanting some answers, as any parent should want. Wouldn't you agree with that?

SERINO: Yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: Wasn't that reasonable on his part?

SERINO: Yes, sir, it was.

DE LA RIONDA: That next thing he knows, he gets home and his son's not - is missing and then he realizes, his son's dead.

SERINO: Yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: And it's not just from natural causes. Somebody had shot him in the chest.

O'MARA: Let me object, your honor, outside the scope of direct examination.

DE LA RIONDA: Your honor, I think this is pertinent to the issue that I'm trying to establish, the scenario that Mr. Martin --

NELSON: Well, then get to your next question, please.

DE LA RIONDA: Yes. In other words, did you preface any of this - I know this is going to be very difficult for you, but please try to listen to all these recordings? I'm assuming you did that because you're a police officer that's been around the block a lot of times.

SERINO: I believe I did, yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. And he -- even though realizing it was going to be emotional said, I'll try to listen through this and try to go through it?

SERINO: Yes, sir, he did.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. And as he's listening through this, he's -- is the emotion kind of building up? Do you see that building up?

SERINO: It was a very emotional moment, yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. And then you play at some point the recording of the screams for help, correct?

SERINO: Yes, sir, I did. Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: But also, in that recording, there's actually a gunshot, correct?

SERINO: Yes, there is.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. And I gather you played, as a good investigator, you played all the recordings from beginning to end, correct?

SERINO: Yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: So that there would be no issue about what was going on, that you actually were thorough in your attempting to tell Mr. Martin what had happened.

SERINO: My objective was to share all the information I had with him on the tape.

DE LA RIONDA: So you were providing all those recordings?

SERINO: Yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. And I gather he's listening to these cries, and then he hears the gunshot, correct?

SERINO: Yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: And then you keep playing it, right?

SERINO: Yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: And I guess it was obvious in the way you were playing it that we were talking about his son having been shot.

SERINO: Correct.

DE LA RIONDA: I mean was there any dispute about that?

SERINO: No, sir, there was not.

DE LA RIONDA: That he understood that that was the death of his son?

SERINO: Yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: And I gather you being as sensitive as you can, based on these circumstances -- I'm assuming it was emotional for you, too.

SERINO: It was trying for me, yes, it was.

DE LA RIONDA: OK.

SERINO: Mm-hmm.

DE LA RIONDA: And obviously being a good investigative police officer, having done this for a long time, you were trying to be as sensitive as you could in dealing with the death of a young boy that the father was there, in other words?

SERINO: Yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. And then at some point you had to ask him some questions about the identification of the voice, correct?

SERINO: Yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: And you, as best as you could, even though you knew Mr. Martin was upset and emotional, you still felt you had a need to ask him at that point, correct?

SERINO: Yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. And I think you asked him something to the effect, do you recognize the voice? Or -- do I have it right, or am I misstating what you said?

SERINO: It was either do you recognize the voice or is that your son's voice in the background?

DE LA RIONDA: OK. And as this was going on, when you specifically asked him that, I think you described Mr. Martin, that his head was down, correct?

SERINO: It was more like looking away from me and the computer.

DE LA RIONDA: Like he didn't even want to deal with it?

SERINO: Yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: Is that how you interpreted it?

SERINO: Yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: And then you stated that it was under his breath. I gather - right? Did I get that right?

SERINO: Yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: And you interpreted it as he said "no," correct?

SERINO: Yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: I mean you didn't flat out hear the word "no" unequivocally, or did you hear it like something under his breath and he was distraught?

SERINO: I heard it and saw the movement of his mouth.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. So you believe -- your opinion is that he said "no"?

SERINO: Yes, sir, it is.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. Now do you know if that no was directed to the fact that you had just played literally not a videotape of his son's death, but an audiotape, or was it related to the identification of the voice, do you know?

O'MARA: Let me object, your honor. That would be speculation of this witness.

NELSON: Sustained.

DE LA RIONDA: Would you agree that when you asked him that, that was after you had played the recording in which you were asking him to identify the voice, but in that same recording he was hearing, for the first time, right, the death of his son?

SERINO: Yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: Right?

SERINO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: As far as you know, he had never heard this shooting before in terms of his son being killed?

SERINO: Yes. This was probably before it was released, so it had to have been the first time.

DE LA RIONDA: OK.

If I may have a moment, your honor.

NELSON: Yes, you may.

DE LA RIONDA: And, sir, I gather in all your years of doing this, when people hearing -- are hearing about the death of a loved one -- even when you go, like, to the door, when you go to their house or something, most people, they react like, oh, no, like, my God, something's happened to a son or loved one is no longer (INAUDIBLE). Is that a normal thing that people -- or do people just react, oh, OK, no big deal?

SERINO: It's extreme grief. So, yes, that is typical.

DE LA RIONDA: And the word "no" is like, I can't believe it, like he's dead. Isn't that a normal thing?

O'MARA: I object, your honor. That would be speculation.

NELSON: It's based upon what his experience has been. So in that regard, I'll allow it.

DE LA RIONDA: Right? It's normal for when you're telling them about the death of a loved one, people say, no, like, you know, like I can't believe it, that kind of stuff?

SERINO: It could be construed as denial.

DE LA RIONDA: Right? Like -

SERINO: Yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: That would be a normal thing, based on your experience, when people say "no," correct?

SERINO: Yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: Thank you, sir. No further questions.

NELSON: Thank you.

Redirect?

O'MARA: Yes, please.

When you talked about during all of the 911 calls, you played all those 911 calls, correct? SERINO: Yes, sir.

O'MARA: But it was only after and specifically after you played the Lauer 911 call that you looked at Mr. Martin and asked if that was the voice of his son screaming in the background, correct?

SERINO: It was the most graphic, yes, sir.

O'MARA: All right. And it was right at that precise time because you wanted to know what he thought of the voice on that tape, didn't you?

DE LA RIONDA: Objection, leading question.

O'MARA: What was the purpose of asking him?

SERINO: To clarify that it was, in fact -- if it was or if it wasn't his son's voice.

O'MARA: Right, because that was significant to your investigation, correct?

SERINO: Yes, sir, it was.

O'MARA: You were doing it, as Mr. De La Rionda just said, as sensitively as you could, but it was something you had to do as the chief investigator?

SERINO: Yes, sir.

O'MARA: Because you knew that if Trayvon Martin's father had said it --

DE LA RIONDA: Objection, that's a leading question.

NELSON: OK. You need to rephrase your question.

O'MARA: Was it significant in your investigation that Mr. Martin said it was not the son of his - the voice of his son?

SERINO: It became significant in the investigation because at that point in time there really wasn't much of a dispute at that time of where that voice came from.

O'MARA: Because it was your understanding in your investigation that other information - well, let me ask you this. What other information supported that that was George Zimmerman screaming?

DE LA RIONDA: Objection as to hearsay now.

O'MARA: Only to the extent that he was the chief investigating officer, your honor. He --

NELSON: (INAUDIBLE) speaking objections (ph), please.

O'MARA: Sorry, your honor.

NELSON: Overruled.

SERINO: It was statements that I obtained from the initial responding officers, coupled with statements provided by an eyewitness. You want names or --

O'MARA: Sure.

SERINO: OK. Officer Tim Smith. A statement that he had heard the defendant make. And John Goode (ph), who at that point had brought (ph) me with a (ph) statement, both in writing and I believe taped also, that it was his belief that it was George Zimmerman the one yelling for help.

O'MARA: So with that information in mind, you were presenting this to Mr. Martin with what idea? What did you want to accomplish by presenting this to Mr. Martin and having him listen to it?

SERINO: For my own clarification to make sure that everybody had it correct, or at that point the information that I had was correct.

O'MARA: And did that information -- did Mr. Martin's response fit into the other information you already had available?

SERINO: At that point in time, yes, sir, it did.

O'MARA: And to the extent that he said "no," you understood that to be what? When he said "no," what question do you think he was answering?

SERINO: That the voice in the background was not that of his son's.

O'MARA: Did he ever contact you in the days or weeks after that to ask you whether or not he could listen to the tape again?

SERINO: No, sir, he did not.

O'MARA: Did he ever say anything to you about, I want to change my mind and I want to listen to it again to see anything else about that tape?

SERINO: No, sir.

O'MARA: Did you question directly Miss Green in regard to her thought as to whose voice that was?

SERINO: Not that I recall, sir, no.

O'MARA: Did she counter or contest Tracy Martin's acknowledgment that it was not his son's voice?

DE LA RIONDA: Objection. Calls for hearsay and also an assumption on the part of Miss. Green.

O'MARA: I'll rephrase it.

NELSON: That objection's sustained.

O'MARA: Did Miss Green counter -- did she say anything that evidenced to you as the investigator that she disagreed with Mr. Martin?

SERINO: No, sir.

O'MARA: Though it was undoubtedly a very emotional time for Mr. Martin and also for you, do you have any concern that he understood your question and that he answered it by saying no?

SERINO: No, sir.

O'MARA: Thank you.

Nothing further, your honor.

NELSON: Thank you.

DE LA RIONDA: You were asked about information you had prior to that.

SERINO: Yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: And you mentioned Mr. Goode (ph), correct? You mentioned Mr. Goode and you mentioned the defendant, Mr. Zimmerman, correct?

SERINO: I didn't mention Mr. Zimmerman. That was an opinion of Mr. Zimmerman.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. You mentioned Tim Smith.

SERINO: Yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: That he had actually heard the call, or he just said this is what Mr. Zimmerman said?

SERINO: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. Right?

SERINO: Yes, based on what Mr. Zimmerman said to Officer Smith.

DE LA RIONDA: Right. And you recall when you played that recording to Mr. Zimmerman, that Mr. Zimmerman said, it doesn't sound like me. You recall that?

SERINO: Yes, I do.

DE LA RIONDA: In terms of -- you played that 911 call, and he told you, it doesn't sound like me, correct?

SERINO: I believe his words were, that doesn't even sound like me, quote/unquote.

DE LA RIONDA: Thank you. Thank you, sir.

And finally, sir, you were asked about Miss Green, who you knew as the fiancee or girlfriend of Mr. Martin, right?

SERINO: Yes, sir. DE LA RIONDA: And would you agree that she was consoling Mr. Martin, correct?

SERINO: Yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: So in terms of what she said she heard or not, she was focusing on providing whatever comfort she could.

SERINO: Yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: To the father of the death -- the father of Trayvon Martin?

SERINO: Yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: Would that be accurate?

SERINO: Yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. Now, I gather in all your experience, you've never had a recording such as this where you don't just have a voice, but you also have the shooting itself all in one recording, or have you had that before?

SERINO: No, this is the first.

DE LA RIONDA: That's the first time?

SERINO: Yes, sir.

DE LA RIONDA: So it's pretty emotionally draining for you, too, I'm assuming, having to play that for the victim's dad?

SERINO: That and the circumstances surrounding the entire incident. Yes, sir.

(END LIVE FEED)

BRIANNA KEILAR, CNN ANCHOR: We are watching key -- a key witness here, the lead investigator in the case, Detective Chris Serino, talking about really the heart of this issue. Whose voice was on that tape and what he heard from Trayvon Martin's father when he first heard the tape. We will come right back to this after a quick break.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

KEILAR: So you are watching the George Zimmerman trial. And as we watch Officer Doris Singleton get on the stand here, we want to get some input from our panel on the witness that we just saw, his second time on the stand, Detective Chris Serino, the lead investigator in this. With us now, we have Michael Greco (ph), who is a criminal defense lawyer, and CNN legal analyst Sunny Hostin.

So, guys, this was pretty fascinating because what you've seen here in the last few days is loved ones in the camp of Trayvon Martin or George Zimmerman and they've all said the same thing, which was, it was my loved one whose voice that I hear on the tape. This is very important, this 911 tape, who was screaming before the gunshot because it really goes to the heart of the question in the case, who was the aggressor?

What we've seen here from Mark O'Mara, the questions that he has thrown at Detective Serino here, we're seeing the detective say that he spoke with Tracy Martin, Trayvon Martin's father, and the first time he heard the 911 tape, when asked if it was his son's voice, he said "no." I mean how damaging do you think this may be, Michael, or was -- do you think the prosecutor here, Bernie De La Rionda, was able to kind of, I guess, fix some of the damage?

MICHAEL GRECO, CRIMINAL DEFENSE LAWYER: No, I think it's very damaging. I think that by bringing somebody in and bringing -- being able to bring out the testimony of the father, without actually having to put the father on the stand, and show to the jury that before anybody knew there was going to be a trial, before this had gotten any media attention, the father said, that's not my son's voice. That's a very big deal. That brings us all the way back to the first couple of weeks of this investigation. And I do not think the prosecution did any - I don't think they were able to cancel out any of the damage that the defense was able to do.

KEILAR: And, Sunny, we'll get right to you in a moment, but let's first listen to what Officer Singleton is saying on the stand.

(BEGIN LIVE FEED)

NELSON: (INAUDIBLE) cross?

DE LA RIONDA: Good afternoon again, Officer Singleton.

You recall actually Tracy Martin saying that was not his voice, that is not his son's voice?

OFFICER DORIS SINGLETON, SANFORD POLICE: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. And you clearly heard him say those words?

SINGLETON: I don't know his exact words, but he was telling us that it was not his -- he was telling Chris that it was not his son's voice that was screaming for help.

DE LA RIONDA: I mean you -- he said words, in other words, like you're saying?

SINGLETON: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. And then after that he put his head down is what you're saying?

SINGLETON: I think it was even while listening to it.

DE LA RIONDA: OK.

SINGLETON: That he was already crying. Because you could hear the gunshot.

DE LA RIONDA: And so, obviously, you were sensitive of that, too, the fact that they were playing this recording to the father of the person that's being shot on the tape, correct?

SINGLETON: Yes. I was - I was choked up myself. I had to stand back and I felt -- you know, I could feel how he must feel because I have children. And I was choked up by it (INAUDIBLE). I felt horrible for him.

DE LA RIONDA: And you could see that and sense that in Mr. Martin?

SINGLETON: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: OK. And now were you there for the playing of all the recordings or just part of it?

SINGLETON: I don't know if there was more recordings. I just -- that really stuck out in my mind because I remember feeling so awful for him, that he would have to hear that.

DE LA RIONDA: So as far as you can recall, the only that you - the only one you recall is the one where they were playing the recording of the screams, but also the shooting of --

SINGLETON: Yes.

DE LA RIONDA: Mr. Martin's son?

SINGLETON: Yes. And that's why it stood out in my mind.

DE LA RIONDA: And what stood out in your mind is the pain that that father must have been going through at the time?

SINGLETON: Yes. To know that he was hearing the sound that ended his son's life was tough to watch.

DE LA RIONDA: And did he, in your opinion, react as any grieving father would react?

SINGLETON: Yes. He was very sad.

DE LA RIONDA: Now, he didn't get up and start screaming or anything, correct? He just basically put his head down and just started crying, right?

SINGLETON: He was - he was - I could see him wiping tears from his eyes. And, I mean, he didn't -- he didn't lose it. I'm sure he was trying to hold himself together. He's in the middle of a police department. But you could see that he was -- he was upset, of course.

DE LA RIONDA: And as you indicated, even while you were doing it, even from a distance away, it was hard for you to listen to that, correct?

SINGLETON: Yes. And I had already heard it.

DE LA RIONDA: And I think you've already stated you felt awful for him, correct?

SINGLETON: I can't imagine having to go through that, because I have children and I couldn't imagine.

DE LA RIONDA: Thank you, ma'am.

NELSON: Thank you.

Any redirect?

O'MARA: Briefly.

As sad as it was, both for you to listen to and obviously for Mr. Martin to go through, is there any doubt in your mind that he had said that that was not his son's voice that he heard screaming?

SINGLETON: No, there's no doubt that he was telling us that that didn't sound like his son to him.

O'MARA: Nothing further, your honor.

NELSON: May Officer Singleton be excused?

O'MARA: Yes, your honor.

DE LA RIONDA: Subject to (INAUDIBLE).

NELSON: You're excused, subject to being re-called.

SINGLETON: Today?

NELSON: Today?

DE LA RIONDA: No.

O'MARA: No.

NELSON: They'll call you. Thank you.

Call your next witness, please.

O'MARA: The defense would call Adam Pollock.

KEILAR: You are watching the George Zimmerman trial. We're going to take a quick break as we await the next defense witness to be called. We'll be right back.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)