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CNN NEWSROOM

Plus-Sized Comedian Too Covered Up?; Doctor On Trial For Killing His Wife; Google Stock Tops $1,000 A Share; Police: Air Marshal Took Photos Up Skirts; Stanford's Season At A Crossroads; Buying Shares Of A Sports Star

Aired October 18, 2013 - 14:30   ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

BROOKE BALDWIN, CNN ANCHOR: Actress Melissa McCarthy knows how to do comedy as she proved in the awesome movie "Bridesmaids" and "Identity Thief." Roll it. My goodness, I just find her hilarious. While she gets praise as a funny lady, she is drawing some protests as a cover girl.

Take a look with me because McCarthy is featured in one of six November covers of "Elle" showcasing the top women in Hollywood. A big green coat, a beautiful cashmere big green coat covers much of her body. So most of the other stars featured like take a look, Reese Witherspoon, show much more skin.

So we went through the Twitter verse. One tweet said "Elle put Melissa McCarthy in a big coat to hide her body. The coat is gorge, aka gorgeous, but the difference in shots is sad." However, McCarthy reportedly says she loves the photo and she told OMG "Insider" she enjoyed the shoots.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

MELISSA MCCARTHY, ACTRESS: It was really, really fun. It was kind of amazing.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

BALDWIN: Joining me now, plus-sized supermodel and author, Emme. Emme.

EMME, PLUS-SIZED SUPERMODEL AND AUTHOR: Hi, Brooke.

BALDWIN: You saw this. What was your first reaction?

EMME: I was really happy that she was on the cover. I thought she personally looked incredible. I thought that there was a misstep with the choice in pictures because this is a monumental opportunity for someone that's above a size 2 or a 4 to be on the cover of a magazine, and we love Melissa. Love her.

BALDWIN: Yes, love, love. And my first reaction, too, was my gosh, she's gorgeous, and this is such a big jacket. Listen, this is what "Elle" magazine, they're responding to us. Quote, "on all of our shoots, our stylists work with the stars to choose the pieces they feel good in. This is no different. Melissa loved this look and is gorgeous on our cover." So listen, if she's happy with it, should people even be perturbed?

EMME: I think that if she's happy -- listen, Melissa -- if she's happy with it, that's great. I think this is all happening because a lot of women are so upset that, A, they're not -- they don't see themselves in covers of magazines. They don't get those opportunities to see those people who are in media, who are entertainers really frequently on these magazine covers.

So when you see your icon and even if Melissa probably doesn't want to be that icon, it's our one icon or few icons you go, why is she all wrapped up? We want to see all of her and celebrate her. It's not a personal affront to her. It's more of the anger and frustration that's going on in the culture being reflected there.

BALDWIN: In culture, you know, people can be irked with "Elle," but as a magazine, a business, don't they respond to the readership? So what does that say about we the reader? Does that say we're not ready to see Melissa McCarthy with a little bit more skin.

EMME: I think we would like whether you're a smaller or medium or larger, I think we want to see women on covers of magazines. I think that it's really important to just know that that's really what's going on in the culture. If the business, if the magazines, if the ad campaigns don't want to have diversified images representing them, that's the other story. And I think it's the deeper issue here.

BALDWIN: I'm sick of talking about photo shopping and big coats. Let's just show these women how they are. Emme, thank you very much. Though I think people disagree with us. Quickly, go ahead.

EMME: I met Melissa, she is gorgeous. We hugged each other and said hi and all this. So for her not to have that beautiful spark grace "Elle's" magazine cover --

BALDWIN: Maybe next time. Emme, thank you.

Coming up next, we are on the case, a Utah doctor is on trial for murdering his beauty queen wife. And just a short time ago, the jury heard from a neighbor who remembers the day the victim's young daughter knocked on her door begging for help. You will hear that plea next.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

BALDWIN: Now to Utah and that doctor on trial for murder, accused of killing his beauty queen wife of some 30 years just to be with their nanny. Prosecutors say Mark Macneill drug and drowned his wife Michelle in their bathtub six years ago. They say he was a cold- hearted husband who moved his mistress into the family's house not long after his wife's funeral.

A 911 operator took to the stand today along with several of Macneill's neighbors and one of them revealed what Macneill said to her days after his wife's death. She also remembered the day she got a knock on the door from Macneill's 6-year-old daughter. Take a listen.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

KRISTI DANIELS, MACNEILL'S NEIGHBOR: There was a knock on my front door, and it was -- I could tell it was a kid's knock because we get a lot of kid knocks. We were in the front room, so I went to the front door. It was Aida and she just said, my dad needs some help.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: OK. Do you recall what time this was?

DANIELS: No.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: OK. Will you tell us who Aida is?

DANIELS: Aida is the youngest of the Macneill family.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: OK. Will you describe her demeanor? How she was acting?

DANIELS: She seemed pretty calm to me, didn't seem out of breath or anything. She just said my dad needs some help.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Did you ever talk to Martin after Michelle's death?

DANIELS: Yes, we had a conversation that he told me that -- yes.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Can I ask you when this conversation happened?

DANIELS: Maybe one or two days after, but I don't know for sure.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: OK.

DANIELS: We were just out in the driveways, just in the common driveway part. And he said, he told me she died of some kind of heart problem, like the basketball player who just died over there on the court. And I don't remember any of the names of any of it, but that's how he referred to it, that I would know that a basketball player just died, but I didn't know that either.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: You didn't know about the basketball player?

DANIELS: Right, but it was some kind of heart thing. Then he said that, you know, the doctor had called. They had a conference call with the doctor and made sure that the family knew it was nobody's fault, it was just all natural.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

BALDWIN: Macneill says he may have accidentally overmedicated his wife after her facelift. He's accused of forcing her to get that surgery after a doctor advised her not to. Some of his own children believe he orchestrated a murder. HLN's Nancy Grace joins me live from the trial next hour. Coming up, Google, as Google hits a major milestone, has a lot of experts perplexed over this one.

Plus, you remember the big heart-palpitating space jump of Felix Baumgartner. That happened a year ago. Now they're releasing the video, the fall from space. Do not miss that.

And why is the Obamacare web site such a disaster? A tech geek is about to explain what went so wrong. Stay right here.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

BALDWIN: Google stock soaring to an all-time high, more than $1,000 a share today. That's up more than 40 percent this year. The search engine giant is super, super hot after its earnings and revenue blew past investors' expectations. Alison Kosik at the New York Stock Exchange for us today. Alison, what's going on? Why?

ALISON KOSIK, CNN BUSINESS CORRESPONDENT: Brooke, I'm looking at this stock keep on going higher and higher. It's at a jaw-dropping $1,011 a share and it's because of what you said. Google reporting solid earnings, sales beating expectations, specifically Google is doing well because of you and me. We're clicking more on the sites' advertisements.

BALDWIN: You're welcome, Google.

KOSIK: Get a little money over here, right? That's how Google makes the bulk of its money -- people who go ahead and click on these advertisements. So these results came after yesterday's closing bell. We saw the stock pop immediately. It continues going up today. Look how well the stock has done since it went public in 2004. Price of $85 a share.

Imagine if you bought a bunch of shares back then and sat on it until now. You would be sitting pretty now. You know, other companies, though, took a hit like Google back in 2008 because of the recession. You look at how well Google has done. It's weathered a lot of storms. It's really been a straight line up and analysts, Brooke, say this stock could go up to $1,200 -- Brooke.

BALDWIN: Do you even remember life before Google? I mean, it wasn't that long ago, but the world has changed. Alison, thank you.

KOSIK: It's a new verb.

BALDWIN: Coming up next, busted. An air marshal accused of taking pictures of women's skirts, shame, shame. We'll tell you how he was caught.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

BALDWIN: You know those federal air marshals who are tasked with keeping you safe while you fly? Well, at a Nashville Airport, one was arrested after a passenger busted him for taking pictures underneath women's skirts. Carol Costello is all over this story. When I heard this, this morning, I thought, why? Why do this?

CAROL COSTELLO, CNN CORRESPONDENT: I thought much the same thing. I mean, can you believe it? A federal air marshal armed with a weapon on a plane, supposedly protecting the passengers, actually had allegedly had his cell phone and placed it down here and was taking pictures up the skirts of women as they walked down the aisle of the plane. Unlucky for this air marshal, though, a passenger noticed and took care of that.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

REY COLLAZO, SOUTHWEST PASSENGER (via telephone): This man right here is taking pictures of ladies going down the aisle, under their dress. And she looked at him and said, sir, are you doing that? And he said, yes.

COSTELLO (voice-over): A passenger onboard a Southwest flight couldn't believe his eyes.

COLLAZO: His left hand was holding his phone, and it was in the aisle. In my mind, I said, I know he's not taking pictures of the girls as they're going by. Next thing I know, lady walked by, and the phone went to the aisle, and he -- click, click, click, click.

COSTELLO: Federal Air Marshal Adam Barge was on duty when he got caught pointing a camera up women's skirts and taking photos as they walked down the aisle of the airplane.

COLLAZO: And I looked at the guy and said, excuse me, you ought to be ashamed of yourself. You're a disgrace to a human being, to a man. I said, I mean, that's wrong. He looked at me, I said, you going to keep taking pictures of ladies as they are going by without them seeing you? And he held the phone securely between his legs, in between his knees. And looked at me, and I said, you need to turn that -- phone off.

COSTELLO: What Rey Collazo didn't know is the man with the cell phone was a federal air marshal. He says when he confronted the air marshal and told a flight attendant what was happening, he tried to delete the photos. That's when he said, no, you don't.

COLLAZO: He took his eyes off me and I snatched it right off him.

COSTELLO: Police say Barge admitted to taking about a dozen inappropriate photos. He faces a charge of disorderly conduct. He was released last night on $10,000 bail.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

BALDWIN: So the question I have is, was this guy fired or suspended because apparently, he admitted to doing this before.

COSTELLO: What's interesting you should ask that question because you would think the TSA would come right out and say if this guy is guilty of this, we're going to fire him, but they're thinking of just suspending him at the moment and by the way, we did reach out to this air marshal for comment, he's not talking -- Brooke.

BALDWIN: Are we surprised?

COSTELLO: No.

BALDWIN: No. Carol, thank you very much.

COSTELLO: Sure.

BALDWIN: Do you ever wonder what it's like to jump from the edge of space? Is this something you ponder? This may be the closest thing you may see to finding that out. I remember watching this, Felix Baumgartner, the whole free fall, gives me butterflies watching. He became the first human to break through the sound barrier with his own body, jumping from a capsule some 24 miles up.

So now, on the one-year anniversary of that space jump, the Red Bull team has released incredible video showing this entire jump from several different angles. One of the cameras strapped to his chest. Watch.

I just got dizzy, and I'm watching this on a teeny little 32-inch screen. Can you imagine doing that? He fell through space at a speed of 843 miles per hour.

Coming up, forget companies in gold. You can now buy stock in professional athletes, yes, athletes. This takes gambling to a whole new level. We are going to talk about that.

Plus, two inmates, they are convicted killers. They are on the run right now. Where do they go and how long can they elude the authorities who are hunting them down? Stay right here.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

BALDWIN: Once a top five team, Stanford, staring down the barrel of a season defining game tomorrow. The Cardinals lost last week in the last second upset to Utah knocking them out of the top 10. Tomorrow doesn't get easier as Stanford plays host to undefeated UCLA.

And here's something you definitely don't hear every day. You ready? You can now buy stock in a jock. You heard me right. A new exchange allows you in a way to own a piece of a professional athlete. And the first sports star offering shares of himself, Houston Texan running back Arian Foster.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Redefine what it is to be an athlete in our generation. Reinvent them as thinkers, businessmen, and CEO of their own brand and their own company.

(END VIDEO CLIP) BALDWIN: A start-up called "Fantex" is behind this new investment and it featured Foster in this online promotion. So how does this work? Zain Asher here to explain stock in a jock. How does it work?

ZAIN ASHER, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Exactly, basically, imagine owning a piece of Magic Johnson before he became so big. This company is offering you the chance to do just that. Basically buy shares in professional athletes. The share price would be linked to how well the athlete's brand is doing, so contracts, endorsements, memorabilia, that kind of thing. Only trading one athlete Arian Foster.

Here's how it's going to work. Foster is going to be basically getting a check for $10 million in exchange he's going to be giving up a 20 percent stake in his grand revenue. Sort of like fantasy sports. I asked the company why did you pick Arian Foster. They said it's about his diversity to generate revenue. I asked is this going to be lucrative. Here's what they had to say.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

ROBERT TUCHMAN, PRESIDENT, GOVIVA: The concept is great. I think they have a tall task ahead of them in signing up players to actually put themselves on the exchange. Initially that's going to be their challenge. With Arian Foster, I think that that's great that they got him to actually step up and do this deal. But I think with this deal, he's going to be the one that's going to benefit a lot.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

ASHER: So Arian foster is getting $10 million, but investors are taking a huge risk. What happens if he gets injured or does something to damage his reputation. Share prices will probably take a hit -- Brooke.

BALDWIN: They will need other athletes to sign on as well.

ASHER: They definitely do.

BALDWIN: Zain Asher, thank you very much.

An asteroid zips by earth and will again, so what happened? What does NASA do? What do we do if one of these starts heading in our direction?

I'm Brooke Baldwin. The news is now. Convicted killers on the run after a mistake sets them free so where do you go if you're on the lam?

The messy Obamacare sign-ups. Some states are doing far better than others. Find out why.

Plus --

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Wiggle it just a little bit. (END VIDEO CLIP)

BALDWIN: These rocks, yes, not so ordinary. And now these Boy Scout leaders are in serious trouble.

And all across America, students and parents right now panicking because their college applications may not go through.