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STUDENT NEWS

How Scotland Became Part of Great Britain; Australia Faces ISIS Terror Threat; Face of Immigration; Arthur Bloom`s Music Therapy Program for Wounded Warriors

Aired September 19, 2014 - 04:00:00   ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: Hello and welcome to the September 19th edition of - come on, Friday`s are awesome. You wanted to hear it, I wanted to say

it. It`s good to have you watching CNN STUDENT NEWS. First up, Scotland, home to more than 5 million people, about the size of South Carolina.

Scots have contributed world-changing inventions related to bicycle tires, penicillin, television. Yesterday, they decided on a potentially nation

altering question: should Scotland be an independent country? The polls were closed when we produced this show, the vote was over. But it was

expected to be very close, and we don`t have results for you yet.

For the latest, teachers please visit cnn.com. We do have an excellent fact-filled look at how Scotland came to be the division of the United

Kingdom that it has been for the past 307 years.

BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: What we know as modern Scotland was formed in the 13 century when England and Scotland signed the treaty of York. Mapping out

Scotland southern border.

60 years later, the countries were at war, with the legendary Scottish rebel William Wallace helping to lead the charge. Wallace`s fight for

freedom was a subject of Hollywood blockbuster, Brave Heart. Years of war paid off for Scotland. IN 1328, England recognized Scottish independence

in the treaty of North Hampton. In 1603, Queen Elizabeth, the last of the Tudors, died at the age of 69. And that cleared the way for King James VI

of Scotland, son of Mary, Queen of Scotts, to become England`s king, too. It was known as the union of the crowns.

Just over 100 years later, parliaments of England and Scotland passed the Acts of Union. It joined the two separate states into one. The Kingdom of

Great Britain, one parliament, one monarch.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

AZUZ: Australia used to be part of the United Kingdom, and like the U.K., it`s an ally of the U.S. in fighting the ISIS terrorist group. Yesterday

Australia`s government said it had prevented a terrorist plot on Australian soil. Two men were arrested and charged Thursday. Australian officials

say they planned to kill a member of the public, a civilian, just like ISIS has killed some of its innocent victims in Iraq and Syria.

Australia`s Sydney "Morning Herald" says, dozens of Australians are fighting overseas on the side of terrorists groups, and that more than 20

of them had returned to Australia afterward.

For that reason, plus the fact that Australia`s military is helping in the fight against ISIS, the Australian government raised its terror alert level

to high last week. That its second highest level.

Meantime, some American lawmakers are giving President Obama the go ahead for part of his plan to fight ISIS. Earlier this week, the House of

Representatives voted 273 to 156 to authorize training and weapons for rebels in Syria. The Senate was expected to approve this as well.

Syria is in the middle of a civil war. ISIS terrorists have taken over some Syrian land. The rebels that the U.S. supports are fighting both

Syria`s government and the ISIS terrorists. So, the American plan is to help these rebels defeat both. Some lawmakers don`t support arming the

rebels. They say at war torn Syria, it`s not always clear who the rebels are and who the extremists are. And that the strategy of arming rebels has

sometimes failed in the past.

We are starting out West today on the CNN STUDENT NEWS Roll Call at West Heaven, UTA. Can you bear the grizzlies? They are all over Rocky Mountain

Junior High School.

One state northeast, we`ve got Wyoming on the roll. Kelly Walsh High School in Casper, home of the Trojans. And in Thief River Falls,

Minnesota, the Prowlers are on the prowl. They are stocking CNN STUDENT NEWS from Lincoln High School.

It looks like Sarah Saldana is about to make history. She is the president`s nominee to lead the U.S. immigration and customs enforcement

agency. She`d be the first Latino ever to hold the job, if she gets it. We say if because President Obama doesn`t have the final say. The

Constitution says he has to seek the advice and consent of the Senate. As part of that, the Senate held a confirmation hearing this week to interview

Saldana. Because it went smoothly, analysts expect she`ll get the job.

One responsibility of the ICE agency is to decide which illegal immigrants get to stay in the U.S. and which are deported.

BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Decades ago, the word immigration conjured of images of boats at Ellis Island, of course, the Statue of Liberty. Today, it`s a

different story. The issue is more heated, more politicized, more complicated. Immigrants are now entering the U.S. from every corner:

Miami to Seattle, L.A. to New York, and especially along the Mexican border. We are talking more than 40 million immigrants in the United

States right now. Both legally and illegally. That`s roughly 13 percent of our population, making America the number one destination for

immigrants.

So, who are these new arrivals? Well, (INAUDIBLE), 11 million are undocumented. A number that`s increased almost year by year since 2000.

Of those who become legal residents, you`d probably get some of them are from Mexico. You`d be right, 14 percent, but you might be surprised to

find out the next two leading countries of birth for new U.S. residents: China and India. Those are the two most populated countries on the planet.

As for work, the latest labor stat show by and large, immigrant workers are in the service industry. We are talking hotels, restaurants, gas stations,

and they are making a lot less than U.S.-born workers, about 160 bucks less per week.

So, regardless of how you feel on the issue, there is no doubt immigrants are here to stay and they play a huge role in the American economy every

day.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

AZUZ: Beyond all of the benefits of listening to music or creating it, it`s been shown to help heal certain brain injuries and decrease anxiety.

Today`s character study`s about a musician who believes music is medicine for the mind. His work has helped hundreds of wounded warriors.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

ARTHUR BLOOM: Music is my earliest memory. I never decided to be a professional musician. It`s just what I`ve always done. It feels great to

play music, but it`s also a mechanism for healing.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We were on this an early morning patrol, walking down the road. I`d never been hit by an IED before. It felt like I got hit by

a wrecking ball. I sat up, my legs were completely gone. What happens if you don`t quite get killed, and you don`t quite survive, you`re somewhere

in the middle? I was a shell of a man. Who I was was gone.

BLOOM (on camera): So, let`s take it right before the melody comes in.

(voice over): Our organization helps wounded warriors play music and recover their lives.

We match the injured troops with professional musicians who come visit at Walter Reed Medical Center and work with them on music projects. Learning

music, writing and performing.

BLOOM (on camera): We are going to try to incorporate (INAUDIBLE)

(voice over): I`m a music therapist, a musician. By injecting music into the space we can inject life.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Something survived that horrible injury in Afghanistan, and that was my ability to play the guitar.

Arthur and his program changed my outlook on what is possible.

BLOOM: Music has no stigma. The folks to work with, when they do music, there`s nothing injured about the way to do it. It`s just good music.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

AZUZ: Members of the Minnesota National Guard`s 114 Transportation Company just returned from Afghanistan. There`s some ceremony and procedure to

this. The troops stand in formation for a few moments, but a toddler just didn`t care. And that didn`t seem to bother anyone else either. After his

mother`s nine month deployment the boy decided he`d waited long enough, not long afterward everyone else got the chance to reunite with their loved

ones.

The happy homecoming brings together this Friday edition of CNN STUDENT NEWS. We hope to reunite with you next week, and if you are in a military

or you have a parent or a relative who is, thank you for your service. Have a great weekend, everyone.

END