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Awaiting Clinton, Trump Hours Before Polls Open; The Obamas and Clintons About to Take Stage in Philadelphia; New Polls: Clinton Gains Over Trump Day Before Election; Awaiting the Obamas and Clintons at Philadelphia Rally. Aired 7-8p ET

Aired November 7, 2016 - 19:00   ET


[19:00:16] ERIN BURNETT, CNN ANCHOR: OUTFRONT next, the final sprint. Hillary Clinton/Donald Trump making a mad dash across the country tonight hours before America heads to the polls. Can you believe it? Who will be the next president of the United States? It is a special election eve edition at last of OUTFRONT.

And good evening, I'm Erin Burnett. OUTFRONT tonight, we begin with the breaking news. Hillary Clinton/Donald Trump with a frenzy last- minute round of rallies fighting for every vote late into the night. Just hours before the polls open, our latest CNN poll of polls of the seven most recent national polls shows Clinton leading trump in all seven. The average is four points.

Both candidates rallying supporters in crucial states tonight. Clinton joined by President Obama, First Lady. Michelle Obama and Bill Clinton in Philadelphia. Bruce Springsteen, Jon Bon Jovi, also performing live there. Trump and running mate Mike Pence, meantime, appearing live soon in Manchester, New Hampshire. A state they believe they can win that would be crucial to Trump's path to 270. Trump barnstorming five states today. He will end very late tonight in Michigan. Trump's final appeal, get out and vote.


DONALD TRUMP (R), PRESIDENTIAL NOMINEE: We're beating everybody. Nobody's seen anything like what we're doing, so we don't want to blow it, we don't want to waste it. Go vote, go vote, because believe me, if we don't win, all of us, honestly, we've all wasted our time. Got to go out, we got to vote and we got to win. Change. Change.


BURNETT: Clinton sounding confident saying she wants to be president for all Americans. Sort of sounding like she thinks she's already got it if she's talking that way. Of course, she's talking after one of the most bitter presidential elections in history.


HILLARY CLINTON (D), PRESIDENTIAL NOMINEE: After tomorrow, the work will begin and one of the highest priorities that I feel an obligation to address is how we bring our country together. A lot of people say, we've got to heal our country or as the Bible says, repair the breach because we have so much divisiveness. We need more love and kindness in America.


Our reporters are fanned out across the nation covering this historic race in these final hours.

We begin with Jeff Zeleny at the Clinton rally in Philadelphia. And Jeff, a very big night, a very big roster. They're putting their last moments into that must-win state.

JEFF ZELENY, CNN CORRESPONDENT: No question, Erin. Democrats are viewing this as sort of the passing of the torch moment. Having the Obamas up there with the secretary, his former secretary of state, Secretary Clinton. And they're trying to make the pivot here to a more optimistic close, what has been a divisive and dark campaign. I am told by senior advisers she will continue the message, she has been saying throughout the day, saying it's a time for healing, it is a time for coming together and solving problems.

Now, on one hand, it looks liked, there she is looking ahead. But her advisers believe that that's a good closing message for people who are, frankly, sick of this campaign and will be voting tomorrow who have not early voted and they're looking for a bit of hope and a bit of, you know, optimism here. Now, there's no question the Clinton campaign is feeling more confident than they were a few days ago, but Erin, they are still eyeing several of those battleground states with a nervous eye. North Carolina and Florida in particular. So they do not feel that this is wrapped up by any means.


ZELENY: But her speech tonight, I'm told, will be an optimistic forward-looking message.

BURNETT: And Jeff, Clinton was asked today whether she'd speak to Trump after the election and what did she say when she was asked that directly?

ZELENY: Yes, she was asked that in a radio interview. And she said she would absolutely speak with Donald Trump after the election. She said that I hope he will play a constructive role here if she wins the election. And she did put that caveat in. So the reality here is, she is trying to show that she is someone who can bridge the divide. But Erin, that is a very open question here regardless of who wins on Tuesday, the idea of governing is a very serious one. And an open question, how any of these sides can come together given how rancorous this election has been.

BURNETT: All right, thank you very much, Jeff.

Now, let's go to Jim Acosta, because he's in Michigan in Grand Rapids. That will be Trump's final stop tonight. Trump with a pretty incredible schedule throughout the day today, Jim, and tonight, that is his big final closing argument in Michigan.

JIM ACOSTA, CNN SENIOR WHITE HOUSE CORRESPONDENT: That's right, Erin. And a Trump campaign official tells me that Donald Trump's closing argument is set. We will hear it again and again tonight. And Trump campaign aides are confident the GOP nominee is going to shock the world and pull of one of the biggest election surprises in American political story. But if you look at the election map, he faces a daunting task, he has to sweep nearly all of the battleground states and smash through Democratic firewalls like here in Michigan where like you said, he will have his final rally later on tonight.


ACOSTA (voice-over): It's the final day of the 2016 campaign. And Donald Trump can't mask his excitement.

TRUMP: Nice head of hair, I'll say thank you. Is there any place more fun to be than a Trump rally? Right? It's the last day of our campaign. Who would have believed this?

ACOSTA: But staring Trump in the face is the cold hard reality. The polls are close, but this unconventional candidate is the underdog heading into Election Day. So Trump is spending the final 48 hours of this race looking to create some electoral map magic. Hitting a batch of battleground states that nearly all sided with President Obama four years ago.

TRUMP: She is such a phony.

ACOSTA: Trump's closing arguments at his rallies and in his ads is that Clinton represents a Washington culture that has abandoned working class voters.

TRUMP: Our movement is about replacing a failed and corrupt political establishment with a new government controlled by you, the American people.

ACOSTA: While Trump has mostly stayed on script in this final stretch, there were moments when he veered off message going on at length against pop stars Jay-z and Beyonce for their performances for Clinton.

TRUMP: So she got Jay-z and Beyonce and the language they used was so bad as they were singing, singing, right? Singing. Talking? Was it talking or singing? I don't know.

ACOSTA: Even though his own warm-up act, rock star, and gun rights activist, Ted Nugent went below the belt in Michigan.

TED NUGENT, MUSICIAN: I got your blue state right here, baby. Black and blue.

ACOSTA: Trump's running mate, Mike Pence, tried a more mild-mannered approach in Minnesota, a normally solid blue state suddenly coveted by the GOP ticket, a move seen by some party strategists as a long shot.

GOV. MIKE PENCE (R), VICE PRESIDENTIAL NOMINEE: You here in Minnesota can close the history books on the Clintons once and for all by electing Donald Trump. As the next president of the United States of America.


ACOSTA: But it appears there are still some lingering questions for Donald Trump. He is not going to be releasing his tax returns it seems in this final day of the campaign, Erin. And one other big question is what Donald Trump will do tomorrow night if he loses. Aides don't want to talk about that. They don't want to answer that question because they're fully confident he's going to win. One thing that is certain, he will return to New York later on tonight. Cast his ballot in Manhattan in the morning -- Erin.

BURNETT: All right, Jim, thank you.

And now let's go to David Chalian who is in Washington. David, we have new polls. This is the final, this is it. This is the final polls. But they do show some moves here on the map.

DAVID CHALIAN, CNN POLITICAL DIRECTOR: There's no doubt about it, Erin, we got five national polls today that meet CNN's standards, in every one of them, Hillary Clinton had the edge from about three to six points and, again, our poll of polls, seven national polls, she has a four-point edge, 46 percent to 42 percent. But let's look as you know, it's a state-by-state battle. Let's look at some of the states where both candidates are campaigning today. The most recent poll out of Michigan, four-point edge for Hillary Clinton. Forty two percent to 38 percent.

In Pennsylvania, where that big rally you saw Jeff Zeleny out there, look at this, poll of polls in Pennsylvania, five-point edge for Hillary Clinton. Forty seven percent to 42 percent. Let's go up to New Hampshire where Donald Trump and Barack Obama on behalf of Hillary Clinton campaigning today. Forty four percent to 41 percent. Three- point edge in that poll of polls. And in critical North Carolina, again, seeing both candidates today where Hillary Clinton's final battleground rally will happen, she's got a two-point edge in the poll of polls there. Forty five percent to 43 percent.

BURNETT: All right. So obviously, though, that's a poll of polls. There's no margin of error on others, there may be. What is, in your view, the most likely path to 270 for each of them?

CHALIAN: Well, yes. Here we are, again, in our final battleground map, five remaining tossup states here. I just want to show you what would happen. We talked a lot about this blue wall, if it actually did crumble, if Donald Trump had some surprise victories. Watch here. First, remember, Hillary Clinton is only 268 -- Erin. She only needs two to get over. Let's give her Nevada. They feel very good about that according to the early vote. Let's give Donald Trump Arizona. Let's give Donald Trump North Carolina.

Now, what if he breaks through this blue wall? I'm going to give him Pennsylvania, I'm going to give him Michigan. If Hillary Clinton can win New Hampshire and Florida, even with Donald Trump getting Pennsylvania and Michigan, she's at 271. It shows you how steep a path it is for Donald Trump. He has to do in addition to breaking through, he needs a state like Florida to be able to actually get over 270.

[19:10:03] BURNETT: All right. Thank you very much, David.

And now our panel, David Gergen who served as adviser to four presidents, Reagan and Bill Clinton. Monica Langley, senior special writer for the "Wall Street Journal." She spoke to Donald Trump last night. Patrick Healy, "New York Times" political correspondent. Clinton supporter Bakari Sellers, former member of the South Carolina House of Representatives. Corey Lewandowski, the former Trump campaign manager. And Jackie Kucinich, Washington Bureau Chief of the "Daily Beast."

David Gergen, you see that map. Steep path for Trump. So, he needs Michigan but he also needs Florida and North Carolina, New Hampshire. He needs a lot of states that right now in the most recent polls he's down in.

DAVID GERGEN, CNN SENIOR POLITICAL ANALYST: It looks like mission impossible from a distance, but if you really think about what happened in one of those states earlier this year, in the primary in Michigan, you know, the experts said that Hillary had a 99 percent chance of winning that Democratic primary against Bernie Sanders. Guess who won? Bernie Sanders. So you can't count Michigan out. And you can't count out some of these other states. I think we have a very good sense of which direction it's likely to go. But until we see the votes, this is such a strange year. Who would have imagined that Donald Trump would even be here the night before this election?

BURNETT: And Patrick, you know, and they both have been, you know, flanking the country. But Donald Trump today obviously with fewer surrogates, five states, Florida, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, New Hampshire and Michigan. That right there says everything you need to know.


BURNETT: Those are the states they want and must win in almost all cases.

HEALY: Right. Right. And Donald Trump began this with the rallies. These rallies he loved, made him. That's where he got sort of his energy. That's where he created the persona that we saw talking about the wall and building a wall, who's going to pay for it. Now he's ending, you know, right where he began. Trying to stay on message. The key thing for the Clinton campaign is they have said, you know, for a while now, he could have the rallies, he could have the giant audiences.

It's our ground game, it's the -- it's the staff and the money that we've been pouring into these states for months and the ones you're talking about specifically, and they're counting on New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, even Florida to sort of cut their way mobilizing all those Hispanic voters. Mobilizing college-educated voters who responded to her from the debate performances. We'll see. We'll see if the Clinton ground game is really all it's been cracked up to be.

BURNETT: And obviously in a couple crucial states there, you mentioned Pennsylvania, New Hampshire, there was no early voting, right? It is going to come down to tomorrow. And Trump did, to your point, he did all of these rallies today. He sounded a bit nostalgic in some of what he had to say. Here he is today.


TRUMP: It's the last day of our campaign. Who would have believed this?


Who would have believed it? Been some campaign, too. It's been some campaign. They say it's the single greatest movement, politically speaking, in the history of this country. Can you believe that? Can you believe that? That's quite an honor. And they say we'll get a tremendous amount of credit, win or lose. I said no, no, no, no, I don't want any credit if we lose. I'm not looking for credit. I'm not looking for credit. I'm looking to make America great again. Not credit.



BURNETT: As I said, a bit nostalgic. Monica you spoke to him last night. You asked him was it worth it, win or lose? And he sort of indicate there the way he always has, you know, no, not worth it. But what he said to you, you quote him, "It took massive amounts of work, incredible amounts of intrusion into my life, unbelievably unfair hits to my family, but the answer is very proudly, yes."


BURNETT: It was worth it.

LANGLEY: That surprised me because, you know, a lot of times he'll say if we don't win, it's been a huge waste of time and money.

BURNETT: Meaning a lot of his money. Sixty six million dollars. But, you know, which he'll be happy to tell us. But it really showed that he does feel that this had been something he can be proud of. Now, he was very high as a kite. I mean, these rallies, he feeds off them. I've been covering him for more than a year and he's also to the -- almost to the same place. You know, a man alone at the podium carrying this campaign on his back. He -- my first article about him in the "Wall Street Journal" was he was a man and a plane. He still is a man and a plane being his strategist, his star and the candidate.

BURNETT: And he also indicated to Monica, Corey, that there were things he might do differently but he didn't tell you what they were. He acknowledged that there were. Do you think there's interests moments now, you know him, where he's being in perspective in saying, hmm, geez, if I had done this three months ago, maybe I'd be ahead now, I made mistakes?

COREY LEWANDOWSKI, FORMER DONALD TRUMP CAMPAIGN MANAGER: Look, I don't think any candidate has even run a perfect campaign. When you look back in this Barack Obama's campaign, you know, and he was successful, with the things that they would have done differently, of course, George W. Bush always things you can do differently better. You know, reconnect with people. Spent more time -- of course every candidate, Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump is going to look back on this campaign and say, we could have done things differently.

BURNETT: But they really believe they can win right now? They really believe that tonight?

LEWANDOWSKI: Absolutely. Look, it is path difficult? Sure. Does it go through Florida? Of course it does. Where's he going to be tonight? He is going to be in New Hampshire, going to be in Michigan. He's been in North Carolina today, in Florida today, in Pennsylvania today. Look, you have to be a perfect candidate. This is the highest job in the world. And he's going to do something that no one else has ever done.

[19:15:12] He is a first-time candidate running for the highest office in the world. No one said he was going to be here. When we launched his campaign, his odds of becoming the Republican nominee according to, you know, 538, one-half of one percent. Today he's on the verge of potentially becoming the next president of the United States. It's a testament of the work that he has put into this campaign.

BURNETT: Bakari, Clinton making her closing arguments. Let me play how she put it today.


CLINTON: Tomorrow is the election, but that is just the beginning. We have to heal this country. We have to bring people together. Listen and respect each other.


BURNETT: Nice things to say, Bakari, but, of course, she has slammed Trump constantly. She's been part of the division. She called his supporters deplorables. How does she keep her word on that if she wins or loses?

BAKARI SELLERS, HILLARY CLINTON SUPPORTER: Well, I think what you're starting to see is that Hillary Clinton is moving a little bit towards the aspect of governing. I mean, we're not even 24, I guess we're 24 hours out. The proverbial cake is already baked. There's not much more you can do. You have to trust your plan. And so, whomever the loser is in this race, the onus is going to be on them as well as the next president of the United States to bring this country together. But I do want to tell you this.

I mean, Marlon Marshall -- who are running the field operations for the Clinton campaign, there are people over there who want to make a statement tomorrow night and they are working extremely hard to make sure that Florida, that North Carolina, that Ohio where they're not even really favored to win, that they win these states and they win maybe not a mandate, but they win with resounding numbers. And what we're starting to see are that African-American voters and Hispanic voters and college educated white women especially are coming out in droves in a lot of the swing states and that bodes very well for the next president.

BURNETT: Jackie?

JACKIE KUCINICH, WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF, "THE DAILY BEAST": You know, what struck me was listening to both candidates today and, you know, with all due respect to Corey, it seems like Clinton had shifted to a more positive message. She wasn't attacking Trump as much today. She wasn't really going after him as she has in the past, where Trump was sort of the --

BURNETT: She's the benefit of being up in all the polls.

KUCINICH: She does. She does. It's very true. And we saw her try this earlier and then have to go back to attacking him because she slipped.


KUCINICH: But Trump was sort of dwelling on Beyonce and Jay-z and their language and ripping Hillary Clinton, and it just -- it seemed like he was going off the sort of scripted path that we've seen him on the last couple of days. And that is just -- it's just striking because he was doing well on the prompter. And to see him veer off of that, you wonder is it because the Comey e-mail situation is sort of off the table at this point?

BURNETT: Right. So David, you know what's interesting though, to the point, in front of his rallies as Jackie's making, going back to what he loves about his rallies. He didn't like the prompter. He liked feeding off of the people that were there. He always talked about his crowd side. And today, he's not done all of these rallies. Right? We have got this one coming up in Michigan late tonight. But here he is at the rallies so far today.


TRUMP: This was set up so recently. Look at all the people. There's never been the crowds, there's never been the enthusiasm and there's never been the loyalty that we have. Never been in this country. Yesterday, they said I set a record. I had crowds, like, massive crowds. Thank you. But she's not getting any crowds. So she gets Beyonce and Jay-z. I like them. I like them. And you know what they do? I get bigger crowds than they do. True. I get far bigger crowds.


BURNETT: It's true, way bigger crowds than Hillary Clinton. And then some of even these massive pop stars. GERGEN: It (INAUDIBLE) narcissism. You know, having a plane, flying

in there, having thousands of people, you know, adore you. But the question becomes, if he loses, let me ask Monica this, if he loses, he's going to miss this. Will he come back and try to lead this movement or is he going to go somewhere else in life?

LANGLEY: That's the big question. I have asked him this. Are you going to do Trump TV? Are you going to continue with your movement because it's clearly not the Republican Party. And he says, I have changed the Republican Party now. It's millions of people, it's more nationalist, it's more --

GERGEN: Where's he go?

LANGLEY: Yes, that's what I'm saying. What are you going to do? And he goes, I'm not talking about it because I'm going to win.


HEALY: But that's not the problem. The problem is, is that there's no, you know, he doesn't see himself as an establishment guy but after Election Day, the establishment kind of takes over. I mean, Paul Ryan will try to reassert himself.

BURNETT: Right. He doesn't want to be a politician. I mean --

HEALY: No, I mean, Ted Cruz will try to reinsert -- there will be all of these people stepping forward. The question is, he does have this history, though, of becoming kind of a permanent antagonist for certain targets. With Barack Obama, he seems sort of obsessed at times with the issue of Barack Obama's birth certificate, where he was from and he did like sort of being in the lime light. But whether he, you know, has sort of the -- frankly, the interest or let's say the stamina, you know, to keep this argument about whether she's corrupt --

GERGEN: Tech color right now --


[19:20:14] BURNETT: OK. Well, I'm going to just pause right now because you're all staying with me.

Next, live pictures because there's a free Bruce Springsteen concert for Hillary Clinton in Philadelphia. She is putting her final bet on Pennsylvania tonight. Trump is going to be in Michigan as I said. The President, the First Lady, Bill Clinton and Chelsea Clinton all going to be in Philadelphia with her tonight. We're going to go there live as that begins. And Donald Trump is about to rally supporters in New Hampshire. This is one of his final events.

And Jeanne Moos with the best of Saturday live taste on this historic race.




UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I brought you a check for the wall.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: It's so wonderful.


[19:25:00] BURNETT: All right. Breaking news. We're standing by for Hillary Clinton rally in Philadelphia. Chelsea Clinton will be there, Bill Clinton, President Obama, First Lady Michelle Obama. We're going to be taking that live. It is a crucial state. There's no early voting in Pennsylvania. It is all about turnout tomorrow. Another swing state that has yet to vote, Michigan. Both campaigns have spent a lot of time and resources in Michigan because it's all about turnout tomorrow.

Jessica Schneider is OUTFRONT live in Warren, Michigan. And Jessica, you've been speaking to voters there. Are they energized? What are they looking at in terms of turnout tomorrow?

JESSICA SCHNEIDER, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Well, you know, Erin, I've been out here in Michigan for four days and quite frankly, it is still a mix out here. Ranges from that grassroots excitement, to people excited about the possibility of a first female president, and it even goes so far as people who still don't like these two candidates. So now the mission of both campaigns as we head into the final hours here is to inspire and to motivate.


PRES. BARACK OBAMA (D), UNITED STATES: She needs to be the next president of the United States.

SCHNEIDER (voice-over): Hillary Clinton zeroing in on Michigan, with a lot of help from President Obama.

OBAMA: I need you to stay focused because I'm asking you to pull off another victory this week.

SCHNEIDER: The President hugely popular here among Democrats rallied at the University of Michigan playing off the football team's undefeated record. Clinton lost the state by one point in the primary to Bernie Sanders and the tightening polls showing Trump gaining momentum in the final week. Do you worry that there's an enthusiasm gap when it comes to Hillary Clinton?

MICHAEL WEISS, HILLARY CLINTON SUPPORTER: Well, a little bit. Only I think because it's such a unique election.

SCHNEIDER: Michael Weiss voted for Sanders in March but is now throwing his full support behind Clinton.

WEISS: I think there's going to be a lot of enthusiasm tomorrow and I'm actually going to be one of the people out there helping to take people to the polls or whoever it takes.

CLINTON: We got to defend the American workers' right to organize and bargain for better wages and benefits. We're going to get incomes rising here in Western Michigan and across this state.

SCHNEIDER: Clinton visiting the western part of the state Monday afternoon for the first time since the primaries. She's campaigned five days in Michigan since her party's convention. Donald Trump spending seven days in the state since becoming the nominee.

CLINTON: We will stop the jobs from leaving your state.

SCHNEIDER: Both focused on trade and jobs. But while the crowd showed up in full force for President Obama, will they show up for Hillary Clinton?

KEN FERENCE, MICHIGAN VOTER: To get enthused for this.

SCHNEIDER: And are you enthused for this?

FERENCE: Trying to.

SCHNEIDER: Trying to be. Has this been a tough election for you?


SCHNEIDER: A tough election for some, for others, a choices between two undesirable candidates.

RUQIAYAH MADLEY, MICHIGAN VOTER: Just like, seemed like a lot of drama in the media these days between the both of the candidates.


SCHNEIDER: So right now, it's all about closing that enthusiasm gap. Both campaigns need numbers from different demographics and Erin, with no early voting in this state, aside from the absentee ballots, tomorrow is really the only day that counts -- Erin.

BURNETT: All right. Thank you very much. And we are now as you can see about 12 hours away, less from polls opening in certain states in this country. Donald Trump making his way to Manchester, New Hampshire, right now. He's going to begin speaking shortly there. This is another state, people can't vote until tomorrow. First votes are going to be cast at three towns in about four and a half hours, only a few people but this is when it starts, four-and-a-half hours.

Sara Murray is OUTFRONT live in Manchester. And Sara, this is a crucial state. Poll of polls in New Hampshire, Trump trailing Clinton by obviously this does, again, all come out to turnout tomorrow.

SARA MURRAY, CNN POLITICS CORRESPONDENT: Well, that's right, Erin. This is a state where the polls have been very perplexing on both sides of the aisle. They've kind of been all over the place over the last few weeks. But it is a (INAUDIBLE) for the Trump campaign feels like they could eke out a victory and that's why when Donald Trump comes here, you're going, of course, see him make a robust pitch to get people to turn out to the polls tomorrow. They know how pivotal that is here, but he's also been commenting over the course of the day that he can't believe that this is last day of his campaign.

And Erin, it's worth thinking back to just how unlikely it was that this billionaire businessman would crash through this very crowded Republican field and become the GOP nominee running against Hillary Clinton and what is the tight enough base to be giving both Democrats and Republicans heartburn. And New Hampshire was his first victory as a presidential candidate, this was his first win of the Republican primaries.

It will be interesting to see how just nostalgic he gets if he touches down here tonight. It was actually supposed to be his last rally here in Manchester before his campaign decided to tack on or actually be his last rally in Michigan this evening, a sign that they really want to want sprint through the finish. They don't want to take anything for granted in these final hours -- Erin.

BURNETT: Wants to feel like he put everything that he had, his heart and soul into it. Thank you, Sara.

And let me bring back my panel. Maria Cardona also joins me, Clinton supporter. Her firm does work with the pro-Clinton Super PAC.

[19:30:03] So Maria, let me start with you. You saw what Sara said. The polls have been perplexing in New Hampshire.


BURNETT: Look at Michigan since May 10 polls. Florida 25.


BURNETT: Michigan is under-polled. That's the Trump campaign bet as to why Clinton's lead of just four in recent polls could be wrong.


BURNETT: Could this state go for Trump?

Could this state go for Trump? I mean, the Clinton campaign put a lot of efforts there in the past few days

MARIA CARDONA, CNN POLITICAL COMMENTATOR: Well, I think the reason why they're putting a lot of effort there, a couple things. First of all, what you said, you know, the polls have been wrong in the past. She lost it in the primary --

BURNETT: After being up, what, 20 points in polling.

CARDONA: Exactly.

BURNETT: That's a big --

CARDONA: One of the things that has allowed Hillary Clinton because she's raised so much money is to make sure she takes nothing for granted on the ground. I talked to a couple colleagues of mine who are in Michigan and they say, yes, it's tight, but we feel really good because we are killing it on the ground in terms of really focusing and contacting and knowing exactly what voters they need to get to the polls.

Knowing it if, you know, Erin is going to go to the polls at 7:00 a.m., you're off the list. If they contact you at 7:00, if you don't go, they'll contact you at 8:00, if you don't go, they'll go to your house if you need a ride.

BURNETT: Sounds terrible.

CARDONA: This stuff -- this stuff is really --



CARDONA: Yes. You know what I mean. I mean --

BURNETT: I understand the point.

CARDONA: They will bug you until you go to the polls. And that kind of infrastructure really matters in the end.

BURNETT: OK, so you can see how that plays well for her, but, again, this is a state that hasn't been in play in 30 years which is obviously Trump's bet, Corey, and when he was earlier -- he says he's going to win Michigan. Here's what he said today.


DONALD TRUMP (R), PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: I mean, look at the crowds we had in Michigan. By the ways, Michigan is in play. You know, it hasn't been in play for Republicans for 30-something years. Michigan is in play because they're tired of watching their car factories be taken out.


BURNETT: Trump campaign have any internal polling in any of these states whether it be Michigan or North Carolina or New Hampshire that show that the standard polling is wrong?

COREY LEWANDOWSKI, CNN POLITICAL COMMENTATOR: Well, I don't work for the Trump campaign so I can't answer that question. I work for CNN.

But what I can tell you is that the Real Clear Politics average right now in Michigan is 3.4 points, is what race is. So, Hillary Clinton is up about three points in Michigan according to the Real Clear Politics. The last poll that came out that Real Clear is tracking, is counting, shows Donald Trump with a two-point lead, 49 percent to 47 percent. Where are those numbers coming from?

We see Stein and Johnson are going through the floor. Basically, they were getting 6 percent, they were getting 2 percent. People in Michigan are now breaking away from that, going to the traditional candidates. The state of Michigan is one where Donald Trump's message of bringing jobs back has resonated there.

State has directly impacted by bad trade deals. His message from day one, is I will bring manufacturing jobs back to our country. If that message works, it's going to work in Michigan.

BURNETT: So, it's Michigan, but it's also broader than Michigan. David, one of the most iconic images from the past is, of course, the one with Harry Truman holding up the newspaper, Dewey feats Truman. Everyone has seen this.

And here we are showing it again. 1948, "Chicago Daily Tribune", at the time ten days before the election, all polls showed Dewey ahead. That's why you've got the headline. They were all wrong. Can Trump do this again 68 years later?

DAVID GERGEN, CNN SENIOR POLITICAL ANALYST: Well, it's worth pointing out that polling has become a lot more sophisticated since 1948.


GERGEN: A lot of reporters were, you know, influenced --

BURNETT: Although now we have this whole thing called social media which polling does not incorporate, at least the polls we would report here.

GERGEN: I agree. I do think there are some real possibilities in states that are not -- haven't been polled very often to kind of be off. I think Michigan turns out probably to be the most -- the best target for Trump in taking a state away that's been in the Democratic stronghold.

Michigan voted Democratic six straight presidential elections. If you can pry that away, it does begin to change the dynamics of it. I think it's smart to go out there and see if he can do it.

There's one big thing different way they're campaigning today and the last days. Hillary is going around consolidating states. He's going around looking for openings. There's a big difference.

PATRICK HEALY, THE NEW YORK TIMES: A big part of his opening is fact that Hillary Clinton lost these two states to Bernie Sanders. I mean, those were two of the darkest days last winter for Hillary Clinton's campaign. And part of what her strategy is, and this is a dicey strategy, is in Michigan and in New Hampshire, she is basically hoping that people who may not, let's say, like her, you know, they didn't -- they weren't warm to her, they didn't have enthusiasm for her in those primaries will abhor Donald Trump so much that they will sort of, like, passively come over to her.

That is a big bet. That's a tough one. And they, themselves, acknowledge. And they said even today, you know, Barack Obama, President Obama, to Michigan, he thought about going to Iowa, but Clinton campaign made it very clear, no, we need you in Michigan.

BURNETT: So, we talked about Michigan, we talk about New Hampshire, all that comes down to turnout tomorrow, because no early voting. And, obviously, the other one is Pennsylvania.

That rally going to begin moments away from the start of it. It is her final rally in that state, and really to get the pomp and circumstance, it's a smart play of the media. Bill Clinton will be there, Chelsea Clinton will be there, President Obama will be there.

[19:35:01] Michelle Obama will be there.

Michelle Kosinski is there. It's beginning in moments. We're going to hear Bill Clinton speak.

Michelle, it is unprecedented to see something like this, a sitting president spending this amount of time on the campaign trail.

MICHELLE KOSINSKI, CNN WHITE HOUSE CORRESPONDENT: Right, and so energetically, too. The kinds of speeches he's been giving, they're been lengthy. They've been emotional. He's been going into the overflow crowd areas and giving a special talk to people there.

It's clear that President Obama, first of all, sees importance of this and he seems to relish it. This will be his 17th and final campaign appearance for Hillary Clinton. We've seen him range from everything from making fun of Donald Trump almost like he's doing standup comedy, to issuing a dire warning to voters, telling them that the fate of the republic rests on their shoulders and the world is teetering in the balance and the choice is up to them.

Tonight, though, what we're hearing from the White House they want this to be something a little bit different. They're calling it an emotional pitch to the people he's met on the way. They want it to be a fresh pitch, something a little different, a little more personal. When you think back to the president's speech at the Democratic National Convention back in July, how that was a little more personal. Looking back to his time in office, looking back to when he was first elected. We expect him to do some more of that tonight, Erin.

BURNETT: All right. Thank you, Michelle.

And Pennsylvania as I said, a swing state, obviously. Doesn't allow early voting. We are, though, getting in some new numbers and these are the latest numbers you're going to get from the battleground states that do allow early voting, because honestly, early voting could determine the whole thing.

Some of these new numbers are good news for Hillary Clinton. Mark Preston is OUTFRONT at the CNN decision desk.

So, Mark, major surge so far in terms of Latinos voting.


You know, so far as you said, new numbers in, more than 40 million people in 39 states have already cast their ballots before Election Day tomorrow. They've already put their two cents into the race.

But let's look at the state of Florida when we're talking about the all-important Latino vote. Right now, more than 6.4 million, nearly 6.5 million people cast their early ballots in Florida. How did that break down?

Look right here, Democrats have a 2 percent edge on the early vote. If you go back to 2008, though, Erin, they had a 4 percent lead and, of course, that's a little bit troubling to Democrats because as you said, the early vote could decide the election, specifically for Democrats.

But let's look at the racial demographics of who actually participated in the early vote. If you look at 2016 to 2008, you're seeing an increase right now of 1 million more white voters voting from 2008 to 2016. African-American voters, about 90,000 more people, but this is the number right here, we're all going do be talking about after the election. It is the Hispanic vote.

More than 429,000 new Hispanics cast ballots in 2016 than in 2008. Hispanics voted overwhelmingly for Barack Obama in the past election. Let us now go up to the state of North Carolina and see how it's going there. Little more than 3 million people cast an early ballot in the state of North Carolina.

And the breakdown there was Democrats holding a lead there in the state. However, if you look at what happened in 2012, Democrats had 15 percent lead in returned early ballots. They only have a 10 percent lead going into Election Day tomorrow, but let's look at these demographics. This is where things get very interesting. If you look at the white vote right there, you're seeing an increase of about 400,000 new white voters from 2012 to 2016 actually cast their ballots.

We'll get this number right here, though, this is the troubling sign and why we saw Barack Obama out spending a lot of time on the campaign trail. This I 33,000 fewer African-Americans voted in 2016 in the early vote than in 2012, but, again, the bottom column, the year of the Latino right here, as you can see, more than 27,000 new Hispanics, Erin, had actually voted in 2016 than 2012 -- Erin.

BURNETT: All right. Mark Preston, thank you very much.

My panel back with me.

And, obviously, when you look at an absolute basis, when you look at a state like Florida, you can say, oh, there's a lot more white voters and millions, 429,000 Latino. But a lot of those Latino voters are now. That could be what turns it for Hillary Clinton.

Are we going to see the same thing tomorrow? Being successful in early voting with turnout is very different than being successful on Election Day?

CARDONA: Well, we'll see. But I think the trend is that you're going to see a historic surge in the Latino vote and I think this is going to be part of the new Hillary Clinton coalition. By the way, there's also historic surge in the Asian-American vote which I know has not gotten a whole lot of attention, but that is going do be a big part of it, too.

And if that happens, if she wins and it's going to be because of a huge turnout of Hispanic voters are, it's no accident. Yes, Donald Trump has served as a huge mobilizer of the Hispanic vote, but the Hillary Clinton campaign has put unprecedented focus, infrastructure and investments into getting out the Hispanic vote in a way that I have never seen before.

[19:40:08] BURNETT: And, of course, isn't a monolithic group, though, Jackie. You know? I mean, obviously, it does tend to vote overwhelmingly Democratic. But in the most recent "USA Today" poll, October 20 to 24th, 18 percent of Hispanics said they were undecided. OK. That is hardly, they're all mad about the wall and all going to straight vote for Hillary Clinton.

Eighteen percent, not enough to win, not even close -- probably half what he would need to win. But it does show that it isn't as simple as it seems.

JACKIE KUCINICH, CNN POLITICAL ANALYST: Well, and partially, that could be the Cuban vote which Cubans but in the Univision poll last week showed that Cubans weren't really gravitating to Donald Trump either.

But I wanted to say something also about, I mean, the Hispanic vote has as much to do with Hillary Clinton, as it has to do with Donald Trump. When you're talking about the African-American vote, that has to do with President Obama and he's never shown to be able to get out the vote for anyone else but himself.

BURNETT: But himself.

KUCINICH: And so that's going to be the test. He's actually never tried as hard as he is trying right now.

BURNETT: And, Monica, that's a key point. Donald Trump says he's being underestimated by both groups. I gave statistics on Latinos, how they're not at all -- a lot of them are undecided.

But you saw 33,000 fewer votes in North Carolina, and by God, Barack Obama has spent a lot of time in North Carolina and that vote was still down. It could change tomorrow, but so far, 33,000 less than last time. And he lost last time.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I've talked to Trump and his advisers and they believe that we, the media, are being unfair about lumping all the Hispanics and African-Americans as pro-Hillary. He believes that they want jobs more than they care about a wall. And he says, I'm the one person who is promising them jobs. So that's their position. He thinks that he can get not enough of them maybe --

(CROSSTALK) CARDONA: I can knock down that myth really easily and that is if Hispanic don't hear you talking about the community in a respectful and inclusive manner, they're not going to listen to you on anything else.

BURNETT: I want to pause for a moment.

HEALY: Data about where the counties are that are turning out these votes of African-Americans, Hispanics. They tend to be right.

BURNETT: They have a database.

HEALY: They tend to lean very Democratic.

BURNETT: All right. Jon Bon Jovi performing. We're going to be going there live. Bill Clinton is going to be speaking in moments.

And, of course, our all-day coverage of election day tomorrow.

OUTFRONT next, live pictures from Philadelphia and Bon Jovi. As I said, Mrs. Obama will be there, president will be there, Chelsea Clinton and Bill Clinton will be there. And Donald Trump narrowly trailing in North Carolina but counting on this tomorrow.


REPORTER: So you think there is a hidden, like, closet Trump voter?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Absolutely. Absolutely.


BURNETT: And Jeanne Moos on "Saturday Night Live" channeling the candidates and even this show.


UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Good evening. Welcome to a special edition of OUTFRONT. I'm Erin Burnett.


BURNETT: And this is Hillary Clinton arriving right now in Philadelphia. Going to that rally where Jon Bon Jovi is performing at this moment. Bruce Springsteen going to be there. Of course, Bill and Chelsea, the president and Mrs. Obama.

Hillary Clinton's plane there, I don't know, as I'm speaking, she's going to get off at this moment. But we do have our pool shot up. We'll be right back in a moment.


[19:47:12] BURNETT: And the breaking news, Hillary Clinton about to speak in Philadelphia. Moments ago, she walked off the plane. There she is. Bill Clinton was behind her. They are heading to rally with President

Obama and Michelle Obama. There he is. Sorry, he was in front of her. Want to be accurate here.

Chelsea Clinton will be there. Michelle Obama, Barack Obama. They're then going to be heading to North Carolina, a state crucial to both campaigns. New CNN poll of polls shows Trump trailing Clinton by just two points. There was a lot of early voting. It's about turnout tomorrow.

Victor Blackwell is OUTFRONT. He's in Raleigh tonight.

And, Victor, that is the bottom line. It's all about turnout, turnout, turnout. That will determine the winner tomorrow.

VICTOR BLACKWELL, CNN CORRESPONDENT: It is, Erin. We got the final early voting totals for North Carolina and this state has set a record -- 3.1 million early and absentee votes cast out of 6.9 million registered voters puts the state at about 45 percent before Election Day, and now the candidates and their campaigns are working to turn out millions more.


UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Mr. Trump needs you help. It's almost not enough just to go vote.

BLACKWELL (voice-over): In the final hours before the polls open in the battleground state of North Carolina --

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Sweetheart, hey, do you want to make some phone calls tonight in Wake County?

BLACKWELL: Donald Trump supporters are scrambling outside the Trump event in Raleigh to get out the vote. This volunteer has come all the way from Texas.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We're here to help you pull North Carolina into the win column.

BLACKWELL: The latest CNN poll of polls shows Trump trailing Clinton by two points. But if you ask some of his most loyal supporters, Trump is ahead in North Carolina.

(on camera): The only way he gets to 270 electoral votes is through this state. Do you think he can pull it out and how does he do it?

GAIL BOZIK, DONALD TRUMP SUPPORTER: Yes, he's already done it. He's already done it, honey.

BLACKWELL: So, you think there's a hidden closet Trump voter?

BOZIK: Absolutely. Absolutely.

BLACKWELL: If he does not win North Carolina, will you accept that result? BRENDA MOSS CLIFTON, DONALD TRUMP SUPPORTER: I will accept that

result, but I am behind him believing that the media is damaging Mr. Trump.

BLACKWELL (voice-over): Inside, Trump repeated his incendiary claim that the election is rigged.

DONALD TRUMP (R), PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: We're in a rigged system, folks. We're in a rigged system. You got to go. You got to vote, got to make sure that vote gets registered in there.

BLACKWELL: This is Ken Williams' fifth Trump rally. He's confident Trump voters will go to polls but fears Trump may lose if votes are stolen.

KEN WILLIAMS, DONALD TRUMP SUPPORTER: I lived in Illinois, Ohio, both require IDs. What's the matter with North Carolina? You need an ID. You shouldn't be able to walk into a poll and vote. Just because you say I live here. That's garbage.

BLACKWELL: At the Democratic headquarters across town, the time for convincing voters to support Hillary Clinton has passed.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Polling place, according to the records we have.

BLACKWELL: They're now making sure their supporters know where to cast their ballot and have a way do get there.

[19:50:02] The Clinton campaign has 33 field offices and more than 130 staging areas across the state.

The Trump campaign did not answer questions about how many they have.

SEN. TIM KAINE (D), VICE PRESIDENTIAL NOMINEE: I know you guys are doing canvassing today and phone calling and knocking on doors so that tomorrow will be a big day here.

BLACKWELL: Vice presidential nominee Tim Kaine thanked volunteers at a staging area in Raleigh today.

KAINE: Let's go win.


SARAH MILLER, HILLARY CLINTON VOLUNTEER: We have to get out and vote. This is critical. This -- I mean, you've heard it said many, many times, this is going to be the election that everyone talks about for decades to come.

BLACKWELL: Both camps working to win the crucial battleground state that could decide this election.


BLACKWELL: And Hillary Clinton, Bill Clinton and Chelsea Clinton will be holding their final event of the campaign here in Raleigh at North Carolina State University at midnight. They'll be joined by Lady Gaga and Bon Jovi. It's a get out vote event just hours before polls open on Election Day -- Erin.

BURNETT: All right. Victor, thank you very much.

My panel back.

Jackie, you look at this, Trump trailing in polls by just a couple points. It's a poll of polls. We don't have a margin of error on that. But the early voting down for African-Americans voters from last time around. Barack Obama, of course, didn't win it last time around.

So, you put those two things together, does tomorrow favor Trump?

KUCINICH: It depends on who comes out. That's why they keep sending the president back there. And, you know, for this White House, this is a bit of a -- they want it back. They didn't like that they lost that to Mitt Romney. They want -- so it's a little bit of a personal grudge that they want that back in the Democratic column.

But it really comes out to turnout game and I will say, you know, the Clinton campaign has put a lot of money and a lot of resource and they built this for Election Day.

BURNETT: And, Corey, 38, 33, I'm sorry, 33 field offices. Trump campaign not saying how many they have. That matters because tomorrow it's, you know, you got the hesitant voter, the votes who thinks their vote doesn't matter. Who's knocking on the door, who's making the phone call for the Trump campaign?

LEWANDOWSKI: Here's what we know. We know that Mitt Romney went into North Carolina on Election Day down 450,000 votes and came out on Election Day winning by 77,000 votes. That's a massive swing.

What we also know is that the RNC has the most aggressive field program they've ever put in place, working North Carolina and Florida and working with the Trump team. There is no light between those two. They have over 6,000 people doing doors in the key battleground states right now.

If I were the Trump campaign and I'm looking at North Carolina, knowing that my numbers are only from where Romney was, he was down 450,000. Trump is down 100,000 right now in early voting. That looks like a big pickup or a hold at least going into North Carolina for tomorrow.

BURNETT: Does that argument carry water with you, David?

GERGEN: Yes, it does, actually.


GERGEN: But I think what's not counted in all of this is -- all of us sort of kind of gasped when we heard 49 percent of the registered voters in North Carolina have already voted in the pre-voting? Usually it's around a third of registered voters.

What that suggests is we're going to have an avalanche of voters in this campaign, much bigger than anybody predicted. I think that's going to introduce an unpredictability factor.


HEALY: One other factor in North Carolina, there's a very competitive governor's race there right now.

BURNETT: Yes, good point.

HEALY: We have lot of energized Democrats who want to get out there, beat the Republican independent -- excuse me, Republican incumbent. That could be a real help for North Carolina.

BURNETT: All right. Thanks to all.

And next, live pictures of Hillary Clinton's rally there Philadelphia. We're going there live. President Obama and the first lady expected to take the stage any moment.

And "Saturday Night Live" goes OUTFRONT.


UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Good evening. Welcome to a special edition of OUTFRONT. I'm Erin Burnett.



BURNETT: This election has been so bizarre and unpredictable that the jokes have written themselves except for they've been reality, but there's still an art to impersonation.

Here's Jeanne Moos.


JEANNE MOOS, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Like the real Clinton and Trump --


ALEC BALDWIN AS DONALD TRUMP: I think it's her sniffs.

MOOS: They have sniffled and shimmied. They have lurked and stalked.


MOOS: Through this endless campaign.

MCKINNON: Women can be charged more than --

MOOS: By the next "SNL" -- MCKINNON: And number four.


MOOS: One of these two will have won the presidency.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Secretary Clinton, what do you think about that?

MCKINNON: I think I'm going to be president.

MOOS: Te last "SNL" before the election had Erin Burnett asking the questions --

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Mr. Trump, everyone can see your tweets.

BALDWIN: Really? And I'm still in this thing?

MOOS: But comedy could barely keep up with reality.

BALDWIN: The FBI is not trying to help me. The FBI doesn't like me. I mean, what even is the FBI?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I'm going to go grab some coffee, you want some coffee?

BALDWIN: No, I'm good. Thanks, sweetie.

MOOS: The very next day, the FBI director gave Hillary's e-mails the all clear. The real candidates -- -- made appearances.

HILLARY CLINTON (D), PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: Donald Trump? Isn't he the one that's, like, uh, you're all losers?

MOOS: One "SNL" skit actually predicted a meeting between the Donald and Mexico's president ten months before it happened.


TRUMP: Enrique.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I brought you the check for the wall.

TRUMP: So wonderful.

MOOS: Not since Tina Fey have comedians been so identified with the candidates they impersonate.

MCKINNON: He's either not that rich.


MCKINNON: Not that charitable.


MCKINNON: Or he's never paid taxes in his life. BALDWIN: Warmer.

MOOS: Hillary liked it.

CLINTON: I thought I was going to fall off my chair.

MOOS: The Donald didn't.

TRUMP: He's portraying somebody who's very mean and nasty and I'm not mean and nasty.

MOOS: Alec Baldwin and Kate McKinnon even came out of character to complain about the campaign.

BALDWIN: Don't you guys feel gross all the time about this?

MOOS: And then off they went together. Hugging each other's supporters.

Just don't expect the real Donald to carry the real Hillary around on his back after we finally get this election off our backs.

Jeanne Moos, CNN, New York.


BURNETT: All right, everyone. It's time. Thanks for joining us. We'll see you tomorrow at a special time, 2:00 to 4:00 p.m. Eastern. Get out, cast your vote.

"AC360" starts now.