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Trump Faces Shutdown; NBA All-Star Game; Tom Brady Injury; Gymnasts Confront Doctor. Aired 6:30-7a ET

Aired January 19, 2018 - 06:30   ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

[06:32:24] ALISYN CAMEROTA, CNN ANCHOR: The Trump administration moving quickly on its plan to relocate the U.S. embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. Senior administration officials tell CNN they have decided to retrofit an existing consulate in west Jerusalem and upgrade security before moving in as early as next year.

CHRIS CUOMO, CNN ANCHOR: Now to a CNN exclusive. Trump appointee Carl Higbie has resigned after CNN uncovered racist, sexist, anti-Muslim and anti-gay comments he made on the radio. Higbie was serving as chief of external affairs for AmeriCorps, the federal government's volunteer service organization. What were the shocking comments? Here are some uncovered by CNN's K-File.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

CARL HIGBIE: It's a lax of morality. The taxpayers are tired of supporting government checks to -- going to these people who think that breeding is a form of employment.

I was called an Islamophobe the other day. I said no, no, no, I'm not afraid of them. I don't like them. Big difference. And they were like, well, you're racist. I was like, fine, if that's the definition of it, then I guess I am.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CUOMO: During the 2016 campaign, Higbie appeared as a guest on CNN and other networks as a Trump supporter.

CAMEROTA: Well, a brutal flu season is gripping America. The virus is spreading in every state but Hawaii. At least 20 children have died. The CDC reporting 149 out of every 100,000 Americans hospitalized. Doctors are urging people to get a flu shot even though the vaccine is not working as effectively as hoped this year. Missouri is the hardest hit state. It has more than 40,000 cases. This time last year, Missouri had just about 6,000 cases.

CUOMO: New details in the horrific case of 13 siblings who prosecutors say were held captive and tortured by their parents in their California home. The children enduring intense physical abuse, including being beaten, choked, tied up for long periods. Authorities also say most were severely malnourished. They accuse the parents of buying food but only allowing children to look at it. Several of the victims have cognitive impairment. The parents, David and Louise Turpin, have pleaded not guilty to all charges against them.

CAMEROTA: Oh, my gosh.

All right, President Trump marking one year in office by taking a victory lap, though his approval ratings are in the 30s and the government is hours from shutting down. So, what do his supporters think now?

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

[06:38:50] CUOMO: President Trump will mark his first year in office tomorrow. So what do the polls say? Well, they all have the president's approval rating holding steady, but steady around 37 percent, 38 percent. President Trump took a victory lap yesterday in Pennsylvania, touting the tax cut, saying that they would be a real revival for the American worker. But today he's facing the real prospect of a government shutdown.

Joining us now with perspective, Michael Caputo, a former Trump campaign adviser.

Good to see you, as always.

MICHAEL CAPUTO, FORMER TRUMP CAMPAIGN ADVISER: Good morning, my friend.

CUOMO: So did you pick up the phone and say, Mr. President, you can't leave. You can't go to Mar-a-Lago before the shutdown deadline. You've got to get in there, man. We need leadership.

CAPUTO: Well, no, actually, I didn't, but I'll tell you, we have seen these --

CUOMO: What?

CAPUTO: We've seen these -- I know. We have seen these government shutdowns, what, about 16 of them in the last couple of decades. Half of them end up happening over a weekend. All of them have very little impact on the essential services of the government.

I know the president doesn't want to have a government shutdown and he's working against one. But I, you know, frankly, I think that Republicans should man up, stand up for what they believe in, and force the Democrats to reject the continuing resolution and force a government shutdown and then make them pay for it.

[06:40:14] CUOMO: Well, let's look at how that works. I mean we've never had a shutdown with one party in control of everything. This would be the first. And McConnell doesn't even seem to have all his own membership on board with the meeting. So why do the Democrats lose if the government shuts down when they're in the minority?

CAPUTO: Well, not just the Democrats, but anyone who votes against the continuing resolution will lose. And that will include some Republicans. The fact of the matter is, there's a bill in front of them. They vote yes or they vote no. And that's rejection or approval of a continuing resolution. That, for example, funds 9 million children, their health care completely. And they're rejecting it over a non-spending issue, a non-germane issue about 700,000 illegal immigrants who -- and, you know, by the way, doesn't even expire until March. And some people say it goes on and -- past that. I think it's a bad political move on the Democrats' part.

CUOMO: Each -- all right, let's look at that. Each party is essentially split on whether or not a shutdown works for their interests, right? The Republicans are at 50 percent. Shut it down if, you know, if it takes to hold to our principles. Democrats, 50 plus percent, shut it down if it doesn't hold to our principles.

What's the biggest principle we see in America right now in this current state of dialogue? DACA, helping the dreamers. Almost 90 percent of the American people.

So how can you say that's not a germane issue and why aren't the Republicans including it in their bill especially if the Democrats have all this leverage and that's their main ask?

CAPUTO: A continuing resolution is about -- about continuing the funding of the federal government. It's actually not very controversial until people attach non-germane issues, non-spending issues like DACA. And Republicans have attached demands in the past --

CUOMO: Sure.

CAPUTO: Which ended up being a sticking point. I mean this is a political football. And, really, at the end of all of this, Chris, we shut down the non-essential areas of government. As long as they keep an eye on the military and make sure, like President Obama did, to pass a pay our military bill so the military doesn't feel this, so the civilian employees of the Department of Defense don't have to go home, and so that, you know, essential workers, let's say maintenance workers of vital defense systems aren't sent home. And, by the way, as we all know, Chris, most of these people who are sent home, the non- essential personnel, end up getting paid for not working anyway.

CUOMO: They get back pay, though.

CAPUTO: Yes.

CUOMO: You know what, look, Michael, you know, thank God you and I aren't living paycheck to paycheck.

CAPUTO: Yes.

CUOMO: But if you've got to pay your mortgage and you don't have the money in the bank at that time, you know, you call the bank, they don't say, oh, get it to us when you can. You know, so back pay isn't always OK. You know, it doesn't always net out.

Let me ask you something. We started last week with this great kumbaya meeting that we all glazed at and the president got good and due credit for being people together in that room and getting them on television and go make a deal. From then on, are you disappointed in what he's shown in terms of deal making?

You know, he goes back on his promise two days later. Then he gets into it about the wall. Kelly goes out there, tries to move his position on the wall towards reasonable. He fights back in a tweet, says the wall hasn't changed. Then he says CHIP shouldn't be in the CR, which is the only thing that the Democrats saw as a carrot in it. And the White House had to correct him.

I mean that just doesn't sound like savvy at work there.

CAPUTO: Well, I mean, I disagree with that, of course. I think the president has a lot of experience negotiating and he changes his positions frequently when he was building, you know, billion dollar skyscrapers and I think he'll do the same things here.

At the -- at the end of all of this, though, we know that -- that DACA really isn't important to the Democratic Party because they chose leaking an allegation that the president used some kind of, you know, expletive during intense negotiations. They chose leaking that and ruing negotiations over getting a deal for DACA.

And, Chris, here's what I think. I believe the president --

CUOMO: What about your boy Lindsey? The president's golf partner.

CAPUTO: I get that. But Lindsey -- Lindsey Graham doesn't represent the Republican Party. Often times he's -- he's in agreement with the president.

CUOMO: What are you talking about, Michael? How can you say that about Lindsey Graham?

CAPUTO: I'm talking about Lindsey Graham being a -- Lindsey Graham, as a legendary, longtime critic of Donald Trump. They're friendly about it. But he's always been critical.

CUOMO: They've been golfing.

CAPUTO: No doubt. And the president doesn't have a problem going golfing or sitting down with people that he disagrees with.

CUOMO: Look --

CAPUTO: But Lindsey Graham doesn't represent the Republican Party as a whole.

CUOMO: The president said what we know he said and he expressed a preference for immigrants from Norway over basically anywhere that has brown people.

CAPUTO: Ah (ph)

CUOMO: That's what he said. CAPUTO: Ah (ph).

CUOMO: That's what he believes. It's consistent with like a half dozen other statements about immigrants.

CAPUTO: But you can't stand --

CUOMO: That's who he is, Michael.

CAPUTO: But you can't stand -- that's not true. But -- and you can't stand to step --

CUOMO: Of course it's true.

CAPUTO: To step back and let the president solve this DACA problem. The fact of the matter is, the president is probably going to --

[06:45:03] CUOMO: He left. He's going golfing. He's leaving to go to an anniversary party for himself today. Who does that?

CAPUTO: The president -- from -- from the -- listen, the president was -- is going to cut a DACA deal that even the Democrats can live with. And I believe he'll probably alienate some of his base with this DACA deal. The problem the Democrats have is they can't have the president in the lead on this issue. The president wants to give these DACA, these dreamers something to hang on to and a license to continue their lives.

CUOMO: Give me one indication that the president wants to do that, one, and then I'll let you go for the weekend.

CAPUTO: Sure. First of all, he's told me that. He's said it several times on the campaign trail. He's been -- he's had some --

CUOMO: When did he tell you that? When did he tell you my priority is saving these dreamers? I feel terrible about it. I want a bill of love.

CAPUTO: He's told America --

CUOMO: You've heard him say that?

CAPUTO: He's told America that he wants that. He's told America that he wants that. And he told me that during the campaign.

CUOMO: I know he told -- he did tell them that and then -- and then he rejected the deal that was the closest thing to a bill of love two days later.

CAPUTO: Yes, but the -- the bill that came to him two days later was filled with deal breakers that the -- the Democrats knew were deal breakers. They -- they were poisoned pills, Chris.

CUOMO: They checked every box he asked (ph). It had -- it had Lindsey Graham and other Republicans behind it from the Senate. It checked every box. Not completely, but that's called compromise. CAPUTO: Yes, but Lindsey Graham -- Lindsey Graham. You keep going to Lindsey Graham. He's not an indication that there is widespread Republican support of anything, Chris. It is not.

CUOMO: And just to be clear --

CAPUTO: I mean he's a legitimate voice in opposition. He's a legitimate critic of the president, but he doesn't represent the majority in Congress. And the Republicans at all.

CUOMO: Most see him as an honest broker when he's -- when the president does the right thing, he's with him. When he doesn't, he's against them. Some would call that leadership.

And, remember, Mitch McConnell, the leader of the Republicans in the Senate, says he doesn't know what the president wants either.

But, Michael Caputo, you make the case and you're always appreciated here to do so. Have a good weekend. Enjoy the anniversary.

CAPUTO: Release the memo, Chris. Release the memo.

CUOMO: I was waiting for that. Tell me what's in it. You don't know?

CAPUTO: What's in it? Four pages. I don't know. But I want a reason why I can see it because we already know --

CUOMO: I know. That's what I'm saying. I've never heard congressmen talk so much smack about something offering nothing of what's in it. But, when it comes out, we'll talk about it, I promise you that. Be well.

CAPUTO: I'll be looking forward to that call.

CUOMO: Alisyn.

CAMEROTA: It sounded almost like you had the memo to release.

CUOMO: I have it right here.

CAMEROTA: I wish. That would be --

CUOMO: That would be a good -- a great show.

CAMEROTA: Yes, it would be.

CUOMO: I'm too tired to read it. I'd have to hand it over to you and then I'd take a nap.

CAMEROTA: I'll do a dramatic reading.

Meanwhile, as we all know, there have been so many women's issues that have come to the fore in this first year of the Trump presidency. So we wanted to know how female Trump voters and supporters feel about the president today and his approach to women, including those who have accused him of harassment. (BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Those women, we have yet to really examine them or know who they are.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: What about the president's own words about grabbing pussy. Excuse me for saying that.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Right.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: He did --

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Oh, because he's a man.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: He said it. And he said it. And there was --

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I've heard way worse than that.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Really?

CAMEROTA: (INAUDIBLE) what do you say?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The way his words are taken out of context over and over again.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CAMEROTA: What happens when die-hard Trump supporters get together with women who call themselves the resistance. That's ahead on NEW DAY.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

CUOMO: It will be team LeBron against team Curry in the NBA's new look all-star game.

Coy Wire has more in the "Bleacher Report."

What is the change and does captain handsome like it?

[06:50:04] COY WIRE, CNN SPORTS CORRESPONDENT: I like it, Chris. For the first time, no Eastern Conference versus Western Conference. LeBron James, Steph Curry going head to head as team captains who are going to pick their teams playground style for this revamped NBA all- star game. They were named captains because they received the most all-star votes from fans. And they're going to make their picks for next month's game in Los Angeles next Thursday. King James gets the first pick as he has the most votes. And with his 14th all-start selection, LeBron now has the most consecutive all-star starts in NBA history.

Patriots star Tom Brady did not practice again yesterday due to that injury to his throwing hand sustained at practice a couple days ago. He did some light drills. And there's no indication that he will not play Sunday's game against Jacksonville. Bur fans and media just had to know, Tom, how did he look out there? (BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

DEVIN MCCOURTY, NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS: Tom was excellent every day. One of the best looking people I've ever met.

QUESTION: Did he look like his hand was bothering him at all?

MCCOURTY: I -- when you look at Tom, I mean, the facial -- it's hard to look at anything else. So I really only saw his face.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

WIRE: He is a good looking man. He is no Chris Cuomo but he knows all about the primetime. He's leading those Patriots to their seventh straight AFC championship game.

CAMEROTA: Even other players are just hypnotized by his face. Wow.

CUOMO: That was a good answer, though.

CAMEROTA: It was great.

CUOMO: It was. And it's true.

CAMEROTA: It was great. And that guy was a good looking guy. So --

CUOMO: It's true.

CAMEROTA: For sure.

OK. On that note, we have to get to this story.

He abused more than 100 girls, including our nation's young role models. Now victims of the USA Gymnastics doctor are sharing their anger to his face and to us, next.

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[06:55:01] (BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

JAMIE DANTZSCHER, FORMER USA OLYMPIC GYMNAST: I'm here today with all these other women, not victims but survivors, to tell you face-to-face that your days of manipulation are over. We have a voice now. We have the power now. There is no therapy, no cure and no healing for monsters like you. You are pure evil.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CAMEROTA: That was former USA Olympic gymnast and bronze medalist Jamie Dantzscher confronting Larry Nassar, the man who sexually abused her and scores of others while he was the team doctor for USA Gymnastics and Michigan State University. More than 100 women testifying at his sentencing hearing.

And Jamie Dantzscher joins us now.

Good morning, Jamie.

JAMIE DANTZSCHER, FORMER USA OLYMPIC GYMNAST: Good morning.

CAMEROTA: Jamie, I have heard a lot of victim impact statements, but never one quite like yours. You gave the statement that all of us hope we would have the coverage to give if confronting, you know, an abuser in the courtroom. What was it like for you to look directly at him and say your piece?

DANTZSCHER: Well, it felt obviously very good. And not only good, but very empowering to be able to face him and say what I've wanted to tell him for so long. And, you know, as a victim of his sexual abuse, I couldn't have done it alone without, you know, over 140 women coming forward and feeling that strength together as one. That is why I think we felt so empowered and grateful for the opportunity to speak to him directly.

And I also think what's important for people to know is, you know, taking down Larry Nassar is just the beginning of what I think is a very important movement, but also it's time for the next step, which is to hold accountable the people responsible that allowed him to get away with his heinous acts for so long.

CAMEROTA: And because you believe that they haven't been held accountable and that it's still happening?

DANTZSCHER: Yes. I mean Larry Nassar's just one of many we need to take down. But, like I had, he wouldn't have been able to get away with this for so long if the people in charge, you know, didn't allow him to for so long. And that's what people need to understand is that -- is that they're like, how -- how did he do this for so many years? I mean he should have been -- he should have been put away over 20 years ago.

You know, there's victims that I know starting from like 1988. And they tried to say they didn't know about it. They did know about it. And they covered it up and allowed him to keep abusing children.

CAMEROTA: Yes. I mean, listen, it --

DANTZSCHER: For years and years after they knew about it.

CAMEROTA: That came out in the trial that there were reports of sexual misconduct by Nassar reached at least 14 different Michigan State University representatives but they didn't do anything about it at the time.

So what was it that you went there to say to him? What was the most important thing that you wanted to get across?

DANTZSCHER: Well, I wanted to tell him I knew that -- you know, he's obviously a monster. And I wanted to tell him that face-to-face. And, like I said before, I'm grateful for the opportunity that, you know, all of us women have this opportunity to speak to him directly, which has been extremely empowering. But also that, you know, USAG and MSU and the people that allowed him to get away with this, they need to be held accountable now. And, you know, I think we're -- we're moving in the right direction with him going to prison. But, like I said, it's just -- it's one of many and it's time for people to really know why he got away with this and they need to be --

CAMEROTA: And so what do you want to see happen to those -- to the people who knew, what do you want to see next?

DANTZSCHER: For -- I mean for me personally, I want to see some change in, you know, in the system. And that people that have been in charge for so long, they need -- they need to clean house there. They need to get rid of these people in charge. The president is still at USA Gymnastics and the people there that knew about it, they need to get rid of them and start over and put people in charge that actually want to protect children and want to put children first.

[06:59:55] CAMEROTA: Yes. After you spoke, Larry Nassar complained to the judge in a six-page letter that it was too hard for him to have to sit there and listen to all of this. The judge, just on this final note, said, that's delusional. You need to talk about these issues with a therapist. And that's not me.