ad info

CNN.com
 MAIN PAGE
 WORLD
 ASIANOW
 U.S.
 LOCAL
 POLITICS
 WEATHER
 BUSINESS
 SPORTS
 TECHNOLOGY
 NATURE
 ENTERTAINMENT
 BOOKS
 TRAVEL
 FOOD
 HEALTH
 STYLE
 IN-DEPTH

 Headline News brief
 daily almanac
 CNN networks
 CNN programs
 on-air transcripts
 news quiz

  CNN WEB SITES:
CNN Websites
 TIME INC. SITES:
 MORE SERVICES:
 video on demand
 video archive
 audio on demand
 news email services
 free email accounts
 desktop headlines
 pointcast
 pagenet

 DISCUSSION:
 message boards
 chat
 feedback

 SITE GUIDES:
 help
 contents
 search

 FASTER ACCESS:
 europe
 japan

 WEB SERVICES:
US

Gangs find new recruits: girls

suspected gang members
Suspected gang members are questioned by Orange County, California, police  
August 22, 1998
Web posted at: 11:40 p.m. EDT (0340 GMT)

From Correspondent Rusty Dornin

SAN FRANCISCO (CNN) -- A growing number of girls are joining boys in showing their colors -- their gang colors.

Experts say the number of "girl gangs" are growing. One of those girls is a 15-year-old high school student named Monica. She says she joined a gang in San Francisco to be safe.

"We protect each other. We help each other when someone's in trouble," she told CNN. "We go help them."

In this case, help means beating up other female gang members.

Police gang investigator Sgt. Lou Perez says it may differ from city to city, but, in San Francisco, female gang members help their male counterparts.

"The boys basically are mostly violent," he said. "They commit the majority of violent crime, the homicides, the drive-by shootings, the robberies. The girl gangs act as their accessories. They will help them to commit these crimes. They will hide weapons for them, they'll hide narcotics for them, and ... sometimes they'll do sexual favors for them."

street
This young woman says she joined a gang for safety  

Sociologists at a seminar this week in San Francisco analyzed women's roles in gangs. One of the biggest differences they found is their choice of weapons.

"Though women fight as much as men, clearly there's a huge difference in one subject, and that's guns. Women don't like guns," said John Hagedorn of the University of Illinois-Chicago.

Monica saw a fellow female gang member shot dead, and now she wants out of the gang.

"I'm planning on getting out soon because I don't like it.... I want a family, I want to keep studying," she said.

But Monica says when she tries to leave, other gang members will beat her up. It's one of many obstacles faced by girls who decide to leave gang life behind.

Related stories:
Latest Headlines

Today on CNN

Related sites:

Note: Pages will open in a new browser window

External sites are not
endorsed by CNN Interactive.

SEARCH CNN.com
Enter keyword(s)   go    help

  
 

Back to the top
© 2000 Cable News Network. All Rights Reserved.
Terms under which this service is provided to you.
Read our privacy guidelines.