Opinion

Give President Trump the chance that Ronald Reagan got

By Tom Barrack
Tom Barrack, a friend of the president, writes that if people stop judging Trump and his administration on every word that is uttered, every hour, and instead hold him accountable over time for the implementation of policies under which he ran, confusion might turn to clarity.
US President Donald Trump is joined by the Congressional leadership and his family as he formally signs his cabinet nominations into law, in the President's Room of the Senate, at the Capitol in Washington,DC on January 20, 2017. 
From left are Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., Donald Trump Jr., Vice President Mike Pence, Jared Kushner, Karen Pence, Ivanka Trump, Barron Trump, Melania Trump, Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, D-Calif., House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif. / AFP / POOL / J. Scott Applewhite

Is Donald Trump's legislative agenda empty?

By Julian Zelizer
Donald Trump will address Congress in what should be a crowning moment for the GOP, but there's much worry about his lack legislative momentum, says Julian Zelizer.

Why Trump is skipping the WHCD

By Dean Obeidallah
Donald Trump's taking a pass on the Correspondents' Dinner because hates being a punch line, but if he thinks he can censor comedy, he's dead wrong, writes Dean Obeidallah.
President Donald Trump holds an African American History Month listening session attended by nominee to lead the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Ben Carson (R), Director of Communications for the Office of Public Liaison Omarosa Manigault (L) and other officials in the Roosevelt Room of the White House on February 1, 2017 in Washington, DC.

How Trump's privilege makes him blind to bigotry

By Michael D'Antonio
Why is the president widening divisions, not healing them? His failure to recognize his prejudices comes from him being isolated by wealth and power his whole life, writes Michael D'Antonio.
Reporters leave after failing to get access to an off camera briefing with White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer and a small group of reporters instead of the normal on camera briefing at the White House on February 24, 2017 in Washington, DC.

Why punishing media will backfire on Trump

By Errol Louis
Excluding select news organizations that reliably report on the Trump White House's fables and foibles reflects an administration that, for all its bravado, feels cornered by the truth. And it won't work, writes Errol Louis.
Angela Rye

Angela Rye: I always knew I was black

By Angela T. Rye
I never had a moment of realization about my blackness — I just was. Blackness was a central thread of my experience as a child and as an adolescent, as it is now that I'm an adult.

How Trump can bridge the racial divide

By Sophia A. Nelson
On Tuesday, President Donald Trump honored Black History Month by visiting the newly-minted National Museum of African American History and Culture. Amid the fanfare and praise that Trump's visit was "a step in the right direction," one question still remains: Is he serious about fixing the racial divide in this country?
lethal injection death penalty explained mg orig_00004409.jpg

I'd like the firing squad, please

By Austin Sarat
The Supreme Court's recent refusal to hear an Alabama death row inmate's appeal highlights growing legal and social uncertainty about methods of execution, says Austin Sarat.
US President Donald Trump speaks following a tour of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, DC, February 21, 2017.

Trump rejects anti-Semitism? Prove it

By Ruth Ben-Ghiat
After a campaign that trafficked in bigotry, Trump should rid the White House of alt-right influences, reject considering a plan that would limit terror probes to Muslim-linked acts.
President Donald Trump smiles as he prepares to speak at his "Make America Great Again Rally" at Orlando-Melbourne International Airport in Melbourne, Fla., Saturday, Feb. 18, 2017.  (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Why Trump's supporters still love him

By Timothy Stanley
He maintains a striking consistency between who he was as a candidate and is as the President, says Tim Stanley, and has cannily stoked hostility to the media to rally his troops and create an enemy to blame for his failures.
President Donald Trump, shakes hands with Army Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster, at Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Florida on February 20, 2017, where he announced that McMaster will be the new national security adviser.

Can McMaster steer Trump clear of ISIS disaster?

By David A. Andelman
There is a great, potentially existential, danger lurking deep within the next critical decision President Trump will have to make -- the one he has said would define his presidency: how to do away with ISIS.
US Army Lieutenant General H.R. McMaster looks on as US President Donald Trump announces him as his national security adviser at his Mar-a-Lago resort in Palm Beach, Florida, on February 20, 2017.

What McMaster needs to say to Americans

By Gayle Lemmon
A good start as H.R. McMaster begins his work would be helping our country's citizens to recognize this: We are a nation at war, writes Gayle Lemmon.
Blind Sheikh Omar Abdel Rahman sits and prays inside an iron cage at the opening of court session in August 1989 in Cairo. Abdel-Rahman, the spiritual leader of Egypt's fundamentalist group Jamaa Islamiyya, was jailed for life in January 1996 for his role in terrorist attacks, including blowing up the World Trade Center in New York in February 1993 and an assassination bid against Egyptian President Mubarak.

The cleric who altered the course of modern history

By Peter Bergen, CNN National Security Analyst
Omar Abdel-Rahman, the Egyptian cleric who died in an American prison on Saturday, was also the spiritual guide and inspiration behind the 9/11 attacks, writes Peter Bergen.
President Donald Trump introduces Gene Huber on stage to speak during a campaign rally at the AeroMod International hangar at Orlando Melbourne International Airport on February 18, 2017 in Melbourne, Florida. President Trump is holding his rally as he continues to try to push his agenda through in Washington, DC.

Donald Trump and the psychology of blame

By Robert Klitzman
People want simple and quick answers to help make sense of a confusing reality, writes Robert Klitzman. Donald Trump has given many that easy narrative.
senator tim scott stopped seven times police sot _00000229.jpg

You've committed the graver sin, Senator Scott

By Issac Bailey
Though Sen. Tim Scott should not have been disparaged for supporting Jeff Sessions for Attorney General, he did a greater injustice by helping to elect Donald Trump, who will turn the clock back on racial equality, writes Issac Bailey.
President-elect Donald Trump (L) stands with Trump National Security Adviser Lt. General Michael  Flynn (R) at Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, Florida, where he is holding meetings on December 21, 2016.

Russiagate: What kind of scandal?

By Julian Zelizer
Julian Zelizer says some Washington scandals have fizzled while others have resulted in big change. It's too early to tell where this one will wind up, he says.
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 16:  U.S. President Donald Trump calls on a reporter during a news conference announcing Alexander Acosta as the new Labor Secretary nominee in the East Room at the White House on February 16, 2017 in Washington, DC. The announcement comes a day after Andrew Puzder withdrew his nomination.  (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Why Trump wants you to hate the media

By Frida Ghitis
While trust in the media overall is low, audiences do have significant levels of trust in the media outlets Trump is attacking, Frida Ghitis writes
A man walks to use a voting booth March 1, 2016, at one of the Virginia primary election polling stations at Colin Powell Elementary School, in Centreville, Virginia.
Voters in a dozen states will take part in "Super Tuesday" -- a series of primaries and caucuses in states ranging from Alaska to Virginia, with Virginia the first to open its polling stations at 6:00 am (1100 GMT).  / AFP / PAUL J. RICHARDS        (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)

To safeguard voting rights, go local

By Joshua A. Douglas
As recently as Thursday's press conference, President Donald Trump continued to peddle falsehoods about his electoral win. It came after a weekend when one of his top aides, Stephen Miller, brazenly claimed that Democrats sent busloads of voters from Massachusetts into New Hampshire, preventing Trump and fellow Republican Kelly Ayotte from winning the state.

Trump's performance fuels worry about his presidency

By Julian Zelizer
His thin skin. His inability to separate fact from fiction. His continuing focus on his election victory margin. His failure to push policy along. All of these are reasons for people to think this still-young presidency is off the rails, writes Julian Zelizer
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks during a news conference announcing Alexander Acosta as the new Labor Secretary nominee in the East Room at the White House on February 16, 2017 in Washington, DC.

Trump voters applaud press conference

By Kayleigh McEnany
While the establishment politicians and the left scoff at President Trump's Thursday press conference, Trump voters celebrate a victorious display of confidence. After a week of rampant speculation about selective leaks from the intelligence community, Trump boldly took to the East Room podium to address a room full of inquisitive journalists.
U.S. Attorney R. Alexander Acosta talks to reporters during a news conference in Miami, Wednesday, Sept. 17, 2008. Acosta announced eight people and eight corporations have been charged with illegally exporting to Iran electronic parts that have military uses, including microchips that have been found in Improvised Explosive Devices in Iraq. (AP photo/Alan Diaz)

Why would Acosta join the Trump team?

By Raul A. Reyes
On Thursday, President Donald Trump held a bizarre news conference in which he railed against the media, Senate Democrats, and the intelligence community. He insisted his former national security adviser, Michael T. Flynn, had done nothing wrong. He falsely asserted that he had "the biggest electoral college win since Ronald Reagan." Oh, and he named his new nominee for secretary of labor, Alexander Acosta. That was supposedly his reason for holding the press conference, yet it took only a few sentences out of about 80 minutes.

Combat troops to Syria? Not so fast

By Mark Hertling
Retired Lt. Gen. Mark Hertling says reports of a presidentially-directed review to step up campaign against ISIS don't signal anything close to a done deal, more like part of military planners' complex exploration of many options.
russia ship

The Cold War returns to the high seas

By James Holmes
By placing a Russian surveillance vessel off the East Coast of the United States, Vladimir Putin is flexing his muscles and reminding the US that it doesn't have a monopoly on the high seas, writes James Holmes.
Donald Trump

The irony of Trump whining about leaks

By Paul Begala
There is some poetic justice in seeing the man who was made President because of leaks potentially hobbled by ones that may legitimately reveal wrongdoing, writes Paul Begala.
President Donald Trump and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu participate in a joint news conference in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Is the two-state solution dead?

By Aaron David Miller
Aaron David Miller writes that President Trump has added a layer of uncertainty to the future of Israeli-Palestinian relations by opening the door to endorsing an ill-defined one-state solution.

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    QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
    QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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      QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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