Opinion

Charles Lincoln speaks during a candlelight vigil at the statue of Jefferson Davis in New Orleans, Monday, April 24, 2017. New Orleans will begin taking down Confederate statutes, becoming the latest Southern body to divorce itself from what some say are symbols of racism and intolerance. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

How to reckon with a Confederate past

By Issac Bailey
Confederate monuments and Confederate flags on public property weren't designed to honor the leaders of the Confederate States of America. They were installed and flown as an everyday reminder to black Southerners, that their homes are not their own, that their bodies can be taken the way their ancestors were, that their voices don't matter.
TOPSHOT - US President Donald Trump awaits the arrival of Italian Prime Minister Paolo Gentiloni for meetings at the White House in Washington, DC, April 20, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / SAUL LOEB        (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

A presidency playing out in dog years

By Michael D'Antonio
Trump at 100 days is just like the Trump who has always been: impulsive, self-aggrandizing, prone to mistakes. To survive, the country will have to push back often, writes Michael D'Antonio.
Dana Farley, of New Orleans, participates in a candlelight vigil at the statue of Jefferson Davis in New Orleans, Monday, April 24, 2017. New Orleans will begin taking down Confederate statutes, becoming the latest Southern body to divorce itself from what some say are symbols of racism and intolerance. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

Confederate monument furor could signal GOP's fate

By Douglas Heye
The announcement that City of New Orleans would remove four monuments to the Confederate era was sure to cause controversy and stoke racial tensions in the city. Removing Confederate monuments can be a delicate issue in the South. But the monument in question isn't your garden variety statue honoring a general who was brave in battle.
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 28:  (AFP OUT) U.S. President Donald Trump addresses a joint session of the U.S. Congress on February 28, 2017 in the House chamber of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC. Trump's first address to Congress focused on national security, tax and regulatory reform, the economy, and healthcare. (Photo by Jim Lo Scalzo - Pool/Getty Images)

Trump's billionaire friendly tax plan

By Edward J. McCaffery
Although he was elected as a man of the people, Trump's tax reform plans make it clear that he is serving as a baron for billionaires, Edward McCaffery writes
DNC Chair Tom Perez

Why the f*** are you talking s*** with kids in the room?

By Mel Robbins, CNN Commentator
More politicians--Democrats, not just Trump--have started cursing in public. Research suggests this might help them seem authentic, but Mel Robbins says there's a good reason this is not good for America.
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Mar-a-lago club Trump

Imagine if Hillary owned Mar-a-Lago

By Jill Filipovic
Trump violated ethics rules by touting his private Mar-a-Lago as "the winter White House." He is using his office to fatten his wallet, while he and others slammed Clinton for involvement in charity that brought relief to millions globally, writes Jill Filipovic.

Barack Obama isn't the action figure we need against Trump

By Sally Kohn, CNN Political Commentator
No, he wasn't there to take on the new President, but In his first public appearance, Obama offered a particularly welcome model of civility as he showed what political discourse should look, writes Sally Kohn.
US President Donald Trump disembarks from Air Force One upon arrival at General Mitchell International Airport in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, April 18, 2017, as he travels to Kenosha, Wisconsin, to speak at Snap-On Tools.

The latest poll numbers should make Trump smile

By Julian Zelizer
Though recent polls indicate Trump's approval ratings are at historic lows, Julian Zelizer writes that the President continues to maintain the loyalty of his base, which will prove crucial in the next election cycle.
President Donald Trump holds a joint news conference with Italian Prime Minister Paolo Gentiloni at the White House on April 20, 2017.

Donald Trump isn't learning from his mistakes

By David Gergen, CNN Senior Political Analyst
As they brace for harsh media attacks on their first 100 days, President Donald Trump's team points out with justification that other presidents have stumbled, too.

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    Give President Trump the chance that Ronald Reagan got

    By Tom Barrack
    Tom Barrack, a friend of the president, writes that if people stop judging Trump and his administration on every word that is uttered, every hour, and instead hold him accountable over time for the implementation of policies under which he ran, confusion might turn to clarity.

Social commentary 

  • BERLIN - JANUARY 18:  Different kinds of vegetables, including paprikas, zucchini, onions and tomatoes, lie on display at a government stand that offers information on nutrition at the Gruene Woche agricultural trade fair January 18, 2008 in Berlin, Germany. The Gruene Woche runs from January 18 through 27.  (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

    Go vegan, save the planet

    By George C. Wang
    Choosing plant-based diets can promote environmental sustainability and make the world better for generations to come, says George Wang
  • I got bumped from a flight. Then I sued

    By Thatcher A. Stone
    Aviation lawyer Thatcher Stone says the United story has two lessons: passengers must follow instructions of flight crews and airlines need to follow the rules on bumping

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Two° 

    QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
    QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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      QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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    The most important number you've never heard of

    By John D. Sutter, CNN
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