Opinions

Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia speaks at the American Enterprise Institute on October 2, 201,2 in Washington, D.C.

Justice Scalia's death could upend America

By Erwin Chemerinsky
The justice's death could have outsize impact on controversial cases before court on abortion, union, affirmative action and be a huge issue in presidental race.

Debate coach: A shameful Republican debate

By Todd Graham
The Republican debate in South Carolina Saturday on night was far below what I'd hoped for as a debate coach, so the grades generally reflected that this time. It's like one of those "group projects" where one person in the group is so poor as to bring everyone else down. Sometimes, nobody gets an A.
Republican presidential candidates (L-R) Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) and Donald Trump participate in a CBS News GOP Debate February 13, 2016 at the Peace Center in Greenville, South Carolina.

Did Donald Trump hurt himself at GOP debate?

By Timothy Stanley
Raucous debate showed GOP at breaking point. Call it creative destruction--with some accusing Cruz of lying, and Trump riling Jeb Bush over his brother and 9-11.
US Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia listens as US President George W. Bush speaks at the the Federalist Society's 25th Anniversary Gala Dinner at Union Station in Washington, DC 15 November 2007. AFP PHOTO/SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

Justice Scalia: How he transformed court

By Richard Lazarus
Justice Antonin Scalia's influence was far more profound and transformative than the many significant individual rulings he authored, writes Richard Lazarus.
Campaign buttons for Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, January 31.

Who's got the lamest campaign slogan?

By John McWhorter
The campaign slogans of Mike Huckabee, George Pataki, and Lincoln Chafee, deserve the obscurity their candidacies ultimately received, says John McWhorter
MIDLAND, TX - JANUARY 20: A pumpjack   sits on the outskirts of town at dawn in the Permian Basin oil field on January 21, 2016 in the oil town of Midland, Texas. Despite recent drops in the price of oil, many residents of Andrews, and similar towns across the Permian, are trying to take the long view and stay optimistic. The Dow Jones industrial average plunged 540 points on Wednesday after crude oil plummeted another 7% and crashed below $27 a barrel.  (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Why oil price plunge is hurting

By Eric Smith
Tumbling crude oil prices are creating alarm as they press down on the world's economic throat. But what can be done? And shouldn't we all be welcoming lower oil prices anyway?

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    QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
    QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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      QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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    The most important number you've never heard of

    By John D. Sutter, CNN
    If the world warms more than 2 degrees Celsius, we're all in a lot of trouble. See how you can get involved below.

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