Opinion

Demonstrators protest on the National Mall in Washington, DC, for the Women's march on January 21, 2017.
Hundreds of thousands of protesters spearheaded by women's rights groups demonstrated across the US to send a defiant message to US President Donald Trump. / AFP / Andrew CABALLERO-REYNOLDS        (Photo credit should read ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images)

Women, this is our rallying cry

By Kristin Rowe-Finkbeiner
The Women's March on Washington started as a trickle, then turned into a wave and then grew into a tsunami. Here's where it started: On Election Night, thousands of Hillary Clinton supporters at the Javits Center in New York stood cheering, buoyed by the polls, even before the final vote tallies came in.
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Donald Trump's battle cry

By David Gergen, CNN Senior Political Analyst
His supporters will cheer his tough inaugural address, but it was no call to unity, and left opponents--and likely governments around the world--rattled by its dark vision, says David Gergen.
Women rally at Capitol Hill as they make their voices heard on the first full day of Donald Trump's presidency, Saturday, Jan. 21, 2017 in Washington. Organizers of the Women's March on Washington expect more than 200,000 people to attend the gathering. Other protests are expected in other U.S. cities. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Dad: Why I'm marching with my daughter

By James Kindall
I'm no joiner, but Trump's behavior has awakened me to how much i care that my daughters can live in a world where a woman controls her own body and future, writes James Kindall.
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Trump's inauguration: How'd he do?

President Donald Trump was sworn in Friday. CNN contributors and analysts offered these assessments of the 45th president's inauguration. The opinions expressed in these commentaries are solely those of the authors.

How to stay safe at the Women's March

By Juliette Kayyem, CNN National Security Analyst
Juliette Kayyem: There are basic preparations participants can take for a passionate, meaningful protest.
US President-elect Donald Trump's wife holds a Bible as Trump is sworn in as President on January 20, 2017 at the US Capitol in Washington, DC. / AFP / Mark RALSTON        (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)

Why legitimacy is what Donald Trump needs most

By Cedric L. Alexander
Just like law enforcement officers, a president earns legitimacy by showing himself to be a leader and advocate for all the people all the time, says Cedric L. Alexander.
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What's the state of sisterhood in the time of Trump?

By Carol Costello
The state of women in the time of Trump is ... fraught. I can't take credit for that insanely perfect word to describe this precarious time -- that goes to feminist writer and critic Roxane Gay.
Selma, Alabama, 50th anniversary of Bloody Sunday, Secretary Perez Crossing the Edmund Parrish Bridge with thousands of other participants in the Selma 50th celebration

Dear Mr. President: We're going to fight back

By Tom Perez
Former Labor Secretary Tom Perez -- child of immigrants and a former civil rights attorney -- has a message for President Trump: unlike you, we're going to keep our promises.

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    QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
    QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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      QAQORTOQ, GREENLAND - JULY 30: Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013 in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Boats are a crucial mode of transportation in the country that has few roads. As cities like Miami, New York and other vulnerable spots around the world strategize about how to respond to climate change, many Greenlanders simply do what theyve always done: adapt. 'Were used to change, said Greenlander Pilu Neilsen. 'We learn to adapt to whatever comes. If all the glaciers melt, well just get more land. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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    The most important number you've never heard of

    By John D. Sutter, CNN
    If the world warms more than 2 degrees Celsius, we're all in a lot of trouble. See how you can get involved below.

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