arts
'Hope' artist Shepard Fairey reveals new posters to protest Trump
Updated 19th January 2017
View gallery
13 Pictures
shepard fairey greater than fear
'Hope' artist Shepard Fairey reveals new posters to protest Trump
Shepard Fairey -- the artist behind the 2008 "Hope" poster depicting then presidential candidate Barack Obama -- has produced a new set of images in time for President-elect Donald Trump's inauguration this Friday.
The three posters feature Muslim, Latino, and African-American women.
Obama 'Hope' artist: Trump is 'dangerous'
"We thought (they) were the three groups that had been maybe criticized by Trump and maybe were going to be most, if not necessarily vulnerable in a literal sense, most feeling that their needs would be neglected in a Trump administration," Fairey told CNN.
Read: Understanding the art of posters and political persuasion
Fairey, along with artists Jessica Sabogal and Ernesto Yerena, teamed up with the non-profit Amplifier Foundation -- a self-described "art machine for social change" -- to produce works for the organization's We the People campaign.
'Hope' street artist creates anti-Trump signs
"It's really about making sure that people remember that 'we the people' means everyone, it means all the people," Fairey said. "I think the campaigns were very divisive, more from one side than the other. But (it's) just reminding people to find their common humanity, and look beyond maybe one narrow definition of what it means to be American."
The campaign's objective, as stated in its Kickstarter campaign, is to "flood" Washington with symbols of hope on Jan. 20.
Read: When does art become too political?
"On January 20th, if this campaign succeeds, we're going to take out full-page ads in the Washington Post with these images, so that people across the capitol and across the country will be able to carry them into the streets, hang them in windows, or paste them on walls," organizers wrote.
So far, more than $1.3 million has been pledged, exceeding the Amplifier Foundation's $60,000 target.

Artists against Trump

"We The Resilient" by Ernesto Yerena (left) and "We The Indivisible" by Jessica Sabogal are also part of the Amplifier Foundation's We The People campaign. Credit: Amplifier Foundation
Fairey, who has previously depicted him in an image inspired by George Orwell's "1984," has long been vocal about Trump.
"Trump is dangerous," Fairey told CNN in the lead-up to the 2016 election. "He's a demagogue who's a bigot and is sexist. He really has no respect for a lot of different people, no experience in politics, and is pursuing the presidency out of his own ego rather than a desire to create the greatest good for the greatest number of people."
Read: Why Obama 'Hope' artist hates Trump...but won't draw Hillary
Fairey is not the only artist making a statement against Trump. Los Angeles-based artist Illma Gore recently revealed a mural painted with human blood to protest Trump, and actress Meryl Streep earned the President-elect's scorn when she spoke out against him in a speech at the Golden Globes earlier this month.
By continuing to browse our site you agree to our use of cookies, revised Privacy Policy and Terms of Use. More information about cookies.
I agree