ad info

 
CNN.com Allpoliticsallpolitics.comwith TIME
    Editions | myCNN | Video | Audio | Headline News Brief | Feedback  

 

  Search
 
 

 
POLITICS
TOP STORIES

Analysis indicates many Gore votes thrown out in Florida

Clinton's chief of staff calls White House over vandalism reports

Gephardt talks bipartisanship, outlines differences

(MORE)

TOP STORIES

India tends to quake survivors

Two Oklahoma State players among 10 killed in plane crash

Sharon calls peace talks a campaign ploy by Barak

Police arrest 100 Davos protesters

(MORE)

MARKETS
4:30pm ET, 4/16
144.70
8257.60
3.71
1394.72
10.90
879.91
 


WORLD

U.S.

LAW

TECHNOLOGY

ENTERTAINMENT

HEALTH

TRAVEL

FOOD

Texas cattle quarantined after violation of mad-cow feed ban
ARTS & STYLE



(MORE HEADLINES)
*
 
CNN Websites
Networks image


Clinton signs bill to step up worldwide AIDS fight

LAKE PLACID, N.Y. (CNN) -- President Clinton mixed some business into a private family vacation in the Adirondacks on Saturday, signing into law a bipartisan bill which he called an "important step in the fight against AIDS."

The new law authorizes $300 million for AIDS prevention and education programs, $60 million for the development and delivery of vaccines and $60 million for international tuberculosis control. It also establishes the World Bank AIDS Trust Fund, which will provide grants to countries hit hardest by the epidemic.

clint graphic
 

"While we're making real progress in the fight again AIDS here at home, we have to do more to combat this plague around the world," Clinton said in his weekly radio address.

"Fighting AIDS worldwide is not just the right thing to do, it's the smart thing," the president said. "AIDS threatens the economies of the poorest countries, the stability of friendly nations, the future of fragile democracies."

Clinton said AIDS and HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, are the leading causes of death in Africa, and increasingly threaten Asia and the states of the former Soviet Union.

"In the hardest-hit countries, AIDS is leaving students without teachers, patients without doctors and children without parents," he said.

The president renewed his call for Congress to approve his proposal for a vaccine tax credit, which he said would speed up development of vaccines crucial to the developing world.

Clinton hailed the bill as a "symbol of the good we can accomplish when we work together in a bipartisan spirit."

He called on Congress to put "progress before partisanship" when it returns in a few weeks, and pass his domestic priorities -- which include a patients' bill of rights, prescription drug coverage for seniors, tax cuts for middle-class families, hate-crime legislation, tougher gun laws, and a minimum-wage increase.

"These are big challenges, but if we make the tough choices together, we'll keep our progress and prosperity going," he said.


MORE STORIES:

Saturday, August 19, 2000


 Search   

Back to the top  © 2001 Cable News Network. All Rights Reserved.
Terms under which this service is provided to you.
Read our privacy guidelines.